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Author Topic: Sunset  (Read 15624 times)
Keith S
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« Reply #20 on: March 30, 2008, 07:41:57 PM »
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May I ask what lens was used for the shot. 35 mm equivalent?
 
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Peteh
I used a 5D with a 24X70L lens.
ISO 800 (becuse I forgot to lower it after taking shots of the building)
6.3 @ 1/250
30mm (full size sensor)

Keith
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marcmccalmont
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« Reply #21 on: March 30, 2008, 08:05:01 PM »
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Keith
Be patient I once climbed Mt Everest backwards too. The best part of digital photography is the feedback loops are very tight and quick, you can learn at a tremendous rate if you want. The camera gives you near instant feedback on composition, exposure and sharpness. The digital darkroom (RAW converter, PS etc) give you quick feedback right in front of your eyes, then if you invest in a good photo printer you have very quick feedback on your prints. So there is a lot to learn (more than in film) but you can learn at a much faster rate.
Enjoy the journey!
Marc
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Marc McCalmont
Steven Draper
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« Reply #22 on: March 30, 2008, 08:57:00 PM »
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Hello Kieth, I hope that you do not mind my very "rough" edit of your image. (I note the halo and a number of other issues that a longer edit would remove.) I wanted to see how much data was in the shadows, and a very quick play in between stacking boxes for our house move.

I know your post, and photographic aim is to capture everything in camera and that is fine, but I have to say that  IMHO, the camera is now, more than ever, a data collector. I know for many images the camera can be tuned to produce very good out of camera images, but as I think was posted earlier, to some extent that is merely moving some choices into the camera processor.

A "null setting" on most dSLR's I'e used produces a pretty disappointing images straight from the camera, with different RAW convertors handling things in their own way as well. I think for many subjects a degree of PP adds a layer to an image, converting it from a sensor capture, to an expression of how the photographer experienced the scene, and with digital the box of tricks is nearly endless.

Please note I will remove the image and delete the jpegs from my drive when the post "dries up" or if you wish me to.

Steven
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image examples are at my website  stevendraperphotography.com   and Polepics is      "Here"
Mike Guilbault
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« Reply #23 on: March 31, 2008, 09:28:51 PM »
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Mike
I went back to see if I could find the first shot before I started cranking down the exposure and found this.

Is this what you ment by more detail?

I dismissed this shot because the settings pulled too much blue from the sky and the sun was blown out.

Keith
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HI Keith.. yes.. that's getting there.  As others have suggested, shooting RAW or possibly using HDR might improve on it.  Of course, trying to re-shoot it will be next to impossible - you did get an amazing sky there!
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Keith S
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« Reply #24 on: April 01, 2008, 10:14:02 PM »
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Steven
Don't worry about deleting the Jpegs and thanks for doing your quick rough. I appreciate it


Marc
Thanks
The Nepalese must wonder about these weird folks carrying cameras and walking backwards. I did try reworking a shot I took in Photoshop and I have to admit WOW can you ever bring out contrast and colour with just a few tweaks.

Mike
I do plan on taking some RAW shots and messing with HDR. I did find one shot I took of two old grain elevators when the rising sun had just peaked over the middle of the two. With the reduced light I was able to get good detail in the shadows and the sky. Will be interesting from here on


Thanks for everyone’s comments and help!
Keith
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marcmccalmont
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« Reply #25 on: April 02, 2008, 06:07:59 AM »
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Steven
Don't worry about deleting the Jpegs and thanks for doing your quick rough. I appreciate it
Marc
Thanks
The Nepalese must wonder about these weird folks carrying cameras and walking backwards. I did try reworking a shot I took in Photoshop and I have to admit WOW can you ever bring out contrast and colour with just a few tweaks.

Mike
I do plan on taking some RAW shots and messing with HDR. I did find one shot I took of two old grain elevators when the rising sun had just peaked over the middle of the two. With the reduced light I was able to get good detail in the shadows and the sky. Will be interesting from here on
Thanks for everyone’s comments and help!
Keith
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Remember your eye can see much more than a camera can capture so there is nothing wrong with making adjustments to regain a more realistic image or for the sake of art the feeling you want to convey. Start thinking of your camera as a data capture device (capture maximum data), your RAW converter as a file creation program (record maximum data in a usable format) and your image editor as your
canvas to bring out either what your eye saw or the feeling you want to express.
Marc
nice shot by the way!
[attachment=5883:attachment]
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Marc McCalmont
kaelaria
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« Reply #26 on: April 02, 2008, 12:13:00 PM »
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Hello Kieth, I hope that you do not mind my very "rough" edit of your image.

Steven
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Now THAT'S killer!!
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Keith S
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« Reply #27 on: September 14, 2009, 11:05:20 PM »
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Quote from: kaelaria
Now THAT'S killer!!

To get this shot I used an 8X ND, circular polarizer and a 2-stop grad ND.

This is what I was talking about manipulating the light before it hits the sensor.
Took me a while to get to this point....





Keith
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jasonrandolph
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« Reply #28 on: September 16, 2009, 04:45:38 PM »
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Whether you use "old-school" tools or the latest post production software doesn't matter as long as the final print is good.  Sure, there's a learning curve involved with the newest tools, but programs like Lightroom are designed to make it easier for you.  Keep in mind that even Ansel the Great did quite extensive post processing (in the darkroom instead of the Lightroom  ).  There's no glory in a "straight" print if it doesn't yield the results you desire.  So don't be afraid to use new tools.  And make sure you're shooting RAW all the time.  If you don't, you're throwing image data away.  It's like baking a cookie and later on trying to add or remove the chocolate chips.  You can do it, but it's going to be messy.

By the way, I use filters all the time, but I use modern tools in addition to the old stuff.  And I like your second photo.  It's nicely composed and I like the vignetting.

I forgot one thing:  I suggest you read the tutorial on exposing to the right of the histogram on this site.  It will explain why you should expose digital cameras differently than you would've done in the film days.  Often it's better to expose longer than what the eye says is right to minimize digital noise in your images.  http://www.luminous-landscape.com/tutorial...ose-right.shtml
« Last Edit: September 16, 2009, 05:06:21 PM by jasonrandolph » Logged

Keith S
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« Reply #29 on: September 16, 2009, 10:08:07 PM »
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Jason
I didn't post this shot as an "in your face" kind of thing about no post processing. When I took the sunset shot I didn't even own a filter cept maybe an uv/protection filter. This shot was the culmination of learning over the past year or so on how to use filters. The 8X ND was used to flatten the water (3.2 sec exposure), CP to get the reflection without the blow-out highlights on the water and the 2 stop ND grad (Lee 4X5 hand held) was for the mountain faces reflecting more light then the water or the trees. I did adjust the exposure and highlights when converting it from RAW and used CS3 to remove sensor dust. I was pretty proud of the technical side of this shot even though the composition could be debated. I think I have found a comfortable balance of getting what I want to the sensor and minor adjustments with software after the shot.

Keith
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jasonrandolph
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« Reply #30 on: September 17, 2009, 04:10:28 PM »
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Keith:

Really, no matter how you get there, that second shot is quite appealing!  I think it would make an outstanding framed print.
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