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Author Topic: The loss of history?  (Read 21537 times)
Rob C
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« Reply #40 on: June 26, 2008, 11:00:40 AM »
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In the USA, Infinity corp. and later Clearchannel corp. bought up most of the pop culture programs and talk shows, and then there's Fox network.  I asked a number of young men who grew up during this era, who enjoyed shows like Beavis and Butthead, and Dumb and Dumber, about their political views.  In a word, fascist.  Which in Il Duce's words being the rule of corporations, fits perfectly with Fox, Clearchannel, and Infinity.  Some of you folks out there may be believers in personal choice, but I find that the corporations are powerful persuaders, particularly when an all-gas car that got 62 mpg in 1988 now gets about 37 mpg today, in spite of the petrol crisis.  We have met the enemy and they are us.
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Hey, he got the trains to run on time! And doing anything on time in southern Europe is a pretty cool achievement. Funny how the UK has become a part of the south in recent years...

I think that any government today is stuck in a hole. There has been such a history of bribing the masses to win the numbers to win the elections that the general good has been blown a long way back down the line. The real cynics are the politicians, all of whom, when in power, commit the same crimes of hubris and swilling from the public trough - a hard act to combine well, but they do it admirably. You see the Mugabe problem in what was Rhodesia, the bread basket of Africa, and you see the total lack of interest that it raises in its neighbouring states. Why? Because in one short leap of political freedom they have all jumped into bed with the same ethic that they see in the rest of the world, the only difference being that it was easier for them to do that where the population had far lower expectations.

The allusion to gasoline consumption may or may not be accurate - I just have no idea - but thatīs only a tiny part of the oil problem. All the other things that are oil derivatives add up to make a huge total that even 100 mpg on a water engine canīt solve. Simply put, the world needs it (oil) as much as it does all the other things that go to make up civilized living. In fact, regardless of price, it will be gone one day. Then what? None of the oil billionaires will escape the consequences of that day any more than will the rest of us. Arabs included. Perhaps if we differentiate between the owners of the raw material in the ground, those who buy it as speculation at one price hoping to sell it on at a higher one just before they have to take delivery, and the petrol companies who make the fuel, then maybe the actual gas companies turn out to have been caught in the midle of a bidding war not of their making. As usual, there is always a bloody middle-man somewhere in the bushes. And, of course, a tax man raking in between 65% and 70% of the total take at the pump.

Corporations are not all that clever either. You need only look at the banks and the mess they are in and into which we have been dragged screaming too. That is not much of a sign of brilliant corporate power raping us all: itīs a sign of dumb and greedy people who have reached the same hubris level as the politicians of whom I wrote earlier. The logic of lending money to people that you know are bad risks because they donīt earn enough or are too shady to honour debt escapes me. Hardly corporation superpowers, then!

In the end, that guy in the movie industry who proclaimed "in this business nobody knows anything," might have been speaking for all of us everywhere. In that sense, you are on the money: we are all to blame in one way or another and we are indeed the enemy.

Rob C
« Last Edit: June 26, 2008, 11:02:55 AM by Rob C » Logged

dalethorn
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« Reply #41 on: June 26, 2008, 01:15:35 PM »
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Mugabe.  Now there's a politico's politico.  My head is spinning so fast I'm going to have to take a leave.  If we were really smart, we'd get over there and start a book project for the opposition guy, while he's still in shape to dictate (!) his recollections of the late campaign.  The story wouldn't matter much - be more interesting and "controversial" if we just made it up.  I know I'm being cynical now, but hey, these things are why people join the military intel services.  Why report the news when you can make it up?  Didn't H.G. Wells and several other writers work for govt. information services?  Forgive the reference to everyone's favorite black hole of history, but according to a reliable source, the primary author of the Warren Report (actually the Report of the President's Commission) was Otto Winnacker(sp?), who in the early 1940's had worked as a German historian.  Who knew?
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Rob C
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« Reply #42 on: June 27, 2008, 04:57:00 AM »
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Mugabe.  Now there's a politico's politico.  My head is spinning so fast I'm going to have to take a leave.  If we were really smart, we'd get over there and start a book project for the opposition guy, while he's still in shape to dictate (!) his recollections of the late campaign.  The story wouldn't matter much - be more interesting and "controversial" if we just made it up.  I know I'm being cynical now, but hey, these things are why people join the military intel services.  Why report the news when you can make it up?  Didn't H.G. Wells and several other writers work for govt. information services?  Forgive the reference to everyone's favorite black hole of history, but according to a reliable source, the primary author of the Warren Report (actually the Report of the President's Commission) was Otto Winnacker(sp?), who in the early 1940's had worked as a German historian.  Who knew?
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Dale, why bother going over there? Central Casting can supply all the actors and probably all the costumes youīd need to tell the story. Save on carbon footprints, too, allowing you the moral highground.

Rob C
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dalethorn
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« Reply #43 on: June 27, 2008, 07:00:11 AM »
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Dale, why bother going over there? Central Casting can supply all the actors and probably all the costumes youīd need to tell the story. Save on carbon footprints, too, allowing you the moral highground.

Rob C
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Well, I saw the movie Wag The Dog a few years back, and it made me squirm in my seat a few times, between laughing fits.  Years before that, I think it was called Network News or some such thing.  These are supposed to be over-the-top satire, yet, either nobody watched them, nobody "got it", or TV is so mesmerizing that (like rich food that's bad for you) nobody can help themselves and we keep taking the bait.  Perhaps in your case or mine, we will not have our personal art turned into a mockery by commercial fame, since there are larger targets to be bought and sold.  Still, we expect there to be standards of quality, achievement, or (gasp) truth separate from the McArt world of TV advertising, so future gen's can go to the art & culture museum and see for themselves.  Maybe we should be having roundtables on the topic of how to design such a museum, and how to promote an alternative to the corporate vision.  Maybe the word *museum* is inappropriate for this, or how such museums are being run today.  And funding is the bottom line, eh?
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