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Author Topic: stuck filter on 16-35L II lens  (Read 10218 times)
daethon
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« Reply #20 on: May 10, 2008, 04:27:55 PM »
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I didn't try heat (kind of paranoid of damaging the lens), but did try cold.  I tried two of the sugested methods, put ice against the filter to try and cool the filter, as well as putting the lens/filter in the refrigerator for a few hours.  Neither did the trick.  Canon apperantly also tried using filter wrenches which also didn't work.
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Sorry to hear that.  best of luck.  thanks for the feedback.
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greygrad
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« Reply #21 on: May 15, 2008, 06:49:10 AM »
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A picture framer's strap clamp always works for me - the kind that has a steel band and tightens via twisting the handle. Put a rubberized cloth (or something that grips and will protect the lens) over the front of the lens, apply the clamp (to the filter only) and tighten. Twist anti-clockwise and bingo, you should have released the filter. The strap clamp is great because the strap contacts (and thus grips) the filter acoss it's entire surface area without stretching. For really stuck filters, dispense with the cloth, and just apply the clamp to the filter.
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Calder
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« Reply #22 on: June 21, 2008, 12:51:48 AM »
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I know this sounds simple, perhaps even over simple,
but it is safe and worth a try.  It has got me out of many a
'stuck filter' situation.

Hold the camera is your left hand with the back facing your palm
and the lense facing upward.

Now place the palm of you right hand over the offending filter,
apply firm pressure and at the same time, try to turn the filter
with your palm.

Give it a try, even try a few times if necessary.  The theory is that
the palm of your had acts like a 360 degree clamp on the filter and applies
equal pressure all round the filter.  One of the reasons for 'stuck' filters
is that we try to remove them with just the index finger and the thumb.
This distorts the circularity of the filter making it difficult to remove.

Good Luck!

Robert Calder
« Last Edit: June 21, 2008, 12:52:58 AM by Calder » Logged
schrodingerscat
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« Reply #23 on: June 21, 2008, 12:25:33 PM »
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I know this sounds simple, perhaps even over simple,
but it is safe and worth a try.  It has got me out of many a
'stuck filter' situation.

Hold the camera is your left hand with the back facing your palm
and the lense facing upward.

Now place the palm of you right hand over the offending filter,
apply firm pressure and at the same time, try to turn the filter
with your palm.

Give it a try, even try a few times if necessary.  The theory is that
the palm of your had acts like a 360 degree clamp on the filter and applies
equal pressure all round the filter.  One of the reasons for 'stuck' filters
is that we try to remove them with just the index finger and the thumb.
This distorts the circularity of the filter making it difficult to remove.

Good Luck!

Robert Calder
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Robert -

For a non-crossthreaded filter, your advice is the best starting point. The filter mounting ring on virtually all modern lenses is plastic, so getting heavy handed in installing a filter can lead to seizing. If the palm of the hand doesn't work, try placing the lens face down on a grippy rubber surface like a jar lid remover or piece of inner tube and turning the lens. Filter wrenches and belt type solutions are the next best bet. Just grabbing at the rim usually causes the filter ring to ovalize, which just makes it grab harder.

If the filter is cross threaded slightly, popping it with a screwdriver can usually break it free. Those that are more so or distorted due to impact usually require destruction of the filter.

Before breaking the glass check if the glass is held in place by a threaded ring with spanner slots. If so, try unscrewing the ring to remove the glass. If breaking is required, be very careful, as the front element can be within millimeters of the filter. I highly recommend taking it to a tech with experience in this. I've done many and it's always nerve wracking, and I always inform the customer that there is potential for damage to the front element. So far I've only had one that ended up with a small divot. The lens was already pretty hammered, so the customer wasn't too upset and I've done several for him since(sports Photog). I'm sure that one of the reasons for Canon's high repair charge is due to factoring in the replacement cost of a front element.

Due to lubricants and electronics, I would not recommend heat solutions. Cold should not be a problem, just so long as it's dry.

Insofar a lubing the filter threads, I use the old fisherman's trick of nose grease. Sounds gross, but works a treat. Graphite has a tendency to get everywhere and is a PITA to clean off.
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marklankton
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« Reply #24 on: June 24, 2008, 10:59:13 PM »
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Quote from: schrodingerscat,Jun 21 2008, 10:25 AM
Robert -

For a non-crossthreaded filter, your advice is the best starting point. The filter mounting ring on virtually all modern lenses is plastic, so getting heavy handed in installing a filter can lead to seizing. If the palm of the hand doesn't work, try placing the lens face down on a grippy rubber surface like a jar lid remover or piece of inner tube and turning the lens. Filter wrenches and belt type solutions are the next best bet. Just grabbing at the rim usually causes the filter ring to ovalize, which just makes it grab harder.

If the filter is cross threaded slightly, popping it with a screwdriver can usually break it free. Those that are more so or distorted due to impact usually require destruction of the filter.

<snip>

Not quite sure what is meant by "popping it with a screwdriver", but an old machinist's trick for this situation is to use a small chisel (a sharp, flat-blade screwdriver could work) to tap the ring of the filter around in the "unscrew"direction. The trick is to use very light taps and lots of them. A bit of alcohol to lubricate the (possibly cross-threaded) threads really helps. This technique is best done by practiced hands, but if you are already contemplating destruction of the filter (!!!) it is definitely worth a try.
« Last Edit: June 24, 2008, 11:08:41 PM by marklankton » Logged
Panopeeper
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« Reply #25 on: June 24, 2008, 11:08:00 PM »
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What's the problem? Keep it on.

I too have this. It has been there for over a year, non-removable with any of the methods suggested, and more. I wanted to have the filter on the lens, did not I? :-)

I plan to sell it; the ad will be "Tamron 28-75mm with a welded on B+W UV filter".
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Gabor
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« Reply #26 on: June 27, 2008, 02:47:16 PM »
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Try automotive oil filter wrenches. Oil filter wrenches are designed to grip and turn smooth-sided oil filters on vehicle engines, and are available in a variety of sizes. They grip the entire diameter of the filter (oil or optical), thus avoiding the pressure point problem referenced earlier, and allow you to apply some serious torque. If lens disassembly is a concern, use two--one on the lens barrel, and the other on the filter. I had the same problem with a polarizer and a 35-350L a few years ago, and tried everything mentioned so far without success. The oil filter wrench had it off in about 30 seconds.
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