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Author Topic: Eye One Display 2 advanced mode calibration  (Read 13813 times)
The View
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« on: May 10, 2008, 01:36:03 AM »
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I used the easy mode so far to calibrate my iMac 24" (the white model, matte, not glossy display).

After receiving an e-mail from X-Rite that stated, that the easy mode is not suitable for more demanding user, I did my first advanced mode calibration.

I had to choose RGB presets, as my iMac doesn't allow for manual RGB channel setup.

I chose 130cd/m2, as my iMac couldn't go as low as 120cd/m2.


I got a red cast. After looking at the screen for longer, it seems to disappear, but you get used to many color casts, even that of old 70's movies.

Compared to that, the easy mode produced a greenish cast.

I did three advanced mode calibrations for different luminance settings. The lower you go with the luminance, the more distinguishable the red cast gets.


The contrast also seems to be much lower at a lower luminance setting. (if you work on a higher luminance setting, does this give you the ILLUSION OF A HIGHER CONTRAST, while your images are actually much lower in contrast?)

Am I doing something wrong? Or am I doing it right now?
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The View
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« Reply #1 on: May 10, 2008, 11:29:18 AM »
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I just started up the computer again.

It's not my imagination.

There is a very distinct, red cast. This calibration is absolutely useless.
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The View
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« Reply #2 on: May 10, 2008, 11:52:12 AM »
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This is what I found on the X-Rite website regarding this problem:

QUOTE:

"Greenish or Pinkish Color Shift on Calibrated LCD Monitor

The color cast (if it is only a slight cast, e.g. to greenish) may be caused by the fact that the Eye-One Match software creates gamma curves with an individual gamma value for each RGB channel. They normally differ only very slightly, e.g. RGB = 2.18, 2.24, 2.21. In most cases, the individual gammas deliver best neutral results. For some cases, this may cause a slightly color shift. If this happens, please try the 'Laptop' mode for your LCD display. The 'Laptop' mode creates gamma curves with the same gamma value for all three RGB channels.
"

Only the color shift isn't slight. My screen is red.


Regarding the use of the laptop setting vs. the LCD setting X-rite says on its support page:

QUOTE:

"Difference Between LCD and Laptop Selections in Eye-One Match

The Laptop settiing should be used when profiling laptop displays, or other lower end LCD displays. Doing so will provide a more neutral gray balance and smoother output by creating a single averaged gamma out of RGB."

I have a 24" iMac (matte, not glossy). It's a great display. Sure, no Eizo ColorEdge, but "lower end"?
« Last Edit: May 10, 2008, 11:56:49 AM by The View » Logged

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The View
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« Reply #3 on: May 10, 2008, 03:27:45 PM »
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Huh, this is a monologue.

Reason of the red cast: X-rite e-mail recommended to set my iMac white point to 6500K.

Just: with an LCD display you can't do this (at least not with an iMac).

One has to set it to "native white point" (info: Martin Evening's CS3 book).


Then the red cast disappears.

And the calibration is very, very close to a calibration in easy mode.
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oldshadow
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« Reply #4 on: May 10, 2008, 09:24:34 PM »
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I have a samsung syncmaster 226bw and I have experinced pink cast after profileing, the eye one seems to have trouble with red when brightness is dialed down, this is not exactly a high end monitor but its all I have!! When I profile I increase brightness to 50% and then profile, brightness is adjusted after contrast and colour adjustments. When brightness is reduced the uneveness of the back light with this monitor is apparent but i don't get get the pink cast.
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Wayne Fox
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« Reply #5 on: May 10, 2008, 09:40:52 PM »
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Huh, this is a monologue.

Reason of the red cast: X-rite e-mail recommended to set my iMac white point to 6500K.

Just: with an LCD display you can't do this (at least not with an iMac).

[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=194898\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

I have set white balance points with iMacs on many ocassions.  Just did it with a new 24" iMac.  Created a 6500k, 6200k and 6000k profile to compare ... felt the 6200k was the most neutral and am using it.
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The View
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« Reply #6 on: May 11, 2008, 04:04:07 AM »
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I have set white balance points with iMacs on many ocassions.  Just did it with a new 24" iMac.  Created a 6500k, 6200k and 6000k profile to compare ... felt the 6200k was the most neutral and am using it.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=194946\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

I couldn't do that.

I got a red cast, that made the computer unusable for editing.

When I chose "native white point", everything went back to normal - normal as in "almost easy mode" results.

I did a test with the test software X-rite provides, but this software fails big time.

At first I came too late to place the i1 on the screen - the test ran without it. Know what: it still passed the test. So that diagnostic software is just nonsense.
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The View
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« Reply #7 on: May 11, 2008, 04:09:37 AM »
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I have a samsung syncmaster 226bw and I have experinced pink cast after profileing, the eye one seems to have trouble with red when brightness is dialed down, this is not exactly a high end monitor but its all I have!! When I profile I increase brightness to 50% and then profile, brightness is adjusted after contrast and colour adjustments. When brightness is reduced the uneveness of the back light with this monitor is apparent but i don't get get the pink cast.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=194944\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]


I got the red cast at different brightness settings.

I really wonder if that advanced mode isn't just bogus, at least regarding LCD panels.

You can't adjust contrast, you can't adjust RGB channels, all you can do is adjust the brightness. That seems to be the only difference between the EASY and the "ADVANCED" mode.

Also, different books, different luminance recommendations.

Martin Evening recommends 140cd/m2, the software 120cd/m2.

I chose 140, as the iMac can't go down to 120. Also, using the software "Shades" to darken the screen doesn't work. There is a known bug in that software, that messes up the calibration.

I have the impression my monitor is a bit green and too cold, but Eye One Display 2 (now called i1 D2) is obviously not able to do an advanced calibration.

Maybe ColorEyes is better than this disappointing Match software by X-rite.
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digitaldog
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« Reply #8 on: May 11, 2008, 08:54:19 AM »
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Is this perhaps and LED backlight OR is there a piece of glass between the display on this model? Both are problematic! One requires the use of a different instrument, the other, removing the glass (bad design by Apple).
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Andrew Rodney
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The View
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« Reply #9 on: May 11, 2008, 01:35:42 PM »
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Is this perhaps and LED backlight OR is there a piece of glass between the display on this model? Both are problematic! One requires the use of a different instrument, the other, removing the glass (bad design by Apple).
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=195003\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

No glass. It's the white 24" iMac.

I expressly bought the matte screen display (even though the aluminum model was already out) because of color calibration (and the dislike of the reflection).

digitaldog, I read in Martin Evening's book, that you can calibrate an LCD display only to its native white point.

Is that right?

And, given that you can't correct RGB channels, nor contrast, what's actually "advanced" in the advanced mode?
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digitaldog
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« Reply #10 on: May 11, 2008, 03:28:08 PM »
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digitaldog, I read in Martin Evening's book, that you can calibrate an LCD display only to its native white point.

Is that right?

Yes, that's the settings I'd be using.
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Andrew Rodney
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The View
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« Reply #11 on: May 11, 2008, 05:48:30 PM »
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Then you can't really do a lot in advanced mode.

(Because contrast settings seem to be for CRTs only, and RGB channels can't be set on my iMac. Maybe there are Eizos or other high end LCD monitors that can do that...)

So, basically, with an iMac I don't get much out of the advanced mode, as I can only adjust luminance.

Is that right?



(Sorry for being a bit inquisitive here, I have a few larger print jobs coming up and try to get the maximum of color accuracy. I'm grateful for any input. This  whole color thing is just going round and round...)
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digitaldog
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« Reply #12 on: May 11, 2008, 06:21:51 PM »
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So, basically, with an iMac I don't get much out of the advanced mode, as I can only adjust luminance.
Is that right?

Correct.
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Andrew Rodney
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jackbingham
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« Reply #13 on: May 11, 2008, 06:43:05 PM »
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"(Sorry for being a bit inquisitive here, I have a few larger print jobs coming up and try to get the maximum of color accuracy"

If your major concern is print to screen match, then native will not do the job for you, unless your lighting conditions happen to match the native color of the display. Allowing the color calibration to be done in the video card to hit a chosen white point may cause minor banding in shadows but it may well be a better choice than native.
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Jack Bingham
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The View
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« Reply #14 on: May 12, 2008, 12:56:50 AM »
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Correct.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=195112\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Thanks. Good to know I'm doing what I can do, and that I'm not doing anything wrong.
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The View
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« Reply #15 on: May 12, 2008, 12:58:36 AM »
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"(Sorry for being a bit inquisitive here, I have a few larger print jobs coming up and try to get the maximum of color accuracy"

If your major concern is print to screen match, then native will not do the job for you, unless your lighting conditions happen to match the native color of the display. Allowing the color calibration to be done in the video card to hit a chosen white point may cause minor banding in shadows but it may well be a better choice than native.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=195114\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Looks like it can't be done with an iMac (the 24" matte screen, white model with the 700GT nVidia 256mb video card).
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jackbingham
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« Reply #16 on: May 12, 2008, 07:33:00 AM »
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This has nothing to do with the display. You have the calibration software make the adjustments in the video card. Set a color temp target and go.
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Jack Bingham
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The View
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« Reply #17 on: May 12, 2008, 02:49:32 PM »
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This has nothing to do with the display. You have the calibration software make the adjustments in the video card. Set a color temp target and go.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=195185\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

I did this.

That's when I got this terrible, red cast.
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digitaldog
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« Reply #18 on: May 12, 2008, 03:16:07 PM »
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I did this.

That's when I got this terrible, red cast.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=195268\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

How's it look at Native?
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Andrew Rodney
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The View
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« Reply #19 on: May 13, 2008, 12:52:51 AM »
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How's it look at Native?
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=195275\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

With the calibration to the native white point it looks OK.

(Little bit cool maybe)

Just almost no difference to the calibration result in "easy mode".
« Last Edit: May 13, 2008, 12:53:46 AM by The View » Logged

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