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Author Topic: Dell 3007WFP-HC  (Read 8109 times)
Raw shooter
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« on: May 21, 2008, 08:32:10 PM »
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How can you calibrate a monitor, like the Dell 3007, without RGB controls?
If I use the native whitepoint, which measures (Eye One Display 2) about 5500k, then of course the image after profiling is warmer - or more yellow.

I have a dual monitor setup. The other monitor is a Dell 2405 with RGB controls - which allow me to set the white point during the calibration stage to 6500K.  Then on the calibrated 2405 monitor, the color is virtually perfect for my work.  On the other hand, the 3007 monitor (without the calibration step) does not match the calibrated 2405.

I have tried every possible combination.  Setting the white point to 6500K on the 3007, still profiles to a different screen appearance (more saturated, less accurate) than the calibrated 2405.

Is there a way to fully optimize a monitor without RGB controls?
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BernardLanguillier
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« Reply #1 on: May 22, 2008, 01:11:37 AM »
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I have been using this on the same screen with the recommended Xrite sensor and got reasonnably good results.

I started by setting the luminosity of the screen at the lowest possible level.

Cheers,
Bernard
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jackbingham
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« Reply #2 on: May 22, 2008, 05:29:04 AM »
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Raw, the only option you have is to use the video card lut to apply adjustments. You may find measuring the actual white point of the 2405 and using that as your target white point for the 3007 will yield a better match.
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Jack Bingham
Integrated Color Corp Makers of Coloreyes Display
Raw shooter
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« Reply #3 on: May 22, 2008, 10:44:53 AM »
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Thanks Bernard and Jack,
I guess my question is really about getting the Dell 3007 (the monitor without RGB controls) to an accurate 6500K -which is my needed white point on both monitors.
Does ColorEyes have a fully functioning Windows product - either XP 32 or Vista 32 - that will work with my Xrite sensor?  It appears on the site linked by Bernard to be a Apple solution and a NEC monitor solution.
I have been looking for the DDC control ColorEyes for a while.  It looks so promising for these kinds of problems.
Thanks in advance.
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BernardLanguillier
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« Reply #4 on: May 22, 2008, 07:25:33 PM »
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Does ColorEyes have a fully functioning Windows product - either XP 32 or Vista 32 - that will work with my Xrite sensor?  It appears on the site linked by Bernard to be a Apple solution and a NEC monitor solution.
I have been looking for the DDC control ColorEyes for a while.  It looks so promising for these kinds of problems.
Thanks in advance.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=197254\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

I have only used Coloreyes on Mac, but I was under the impression that they have a Win version as well.

If I recall, they let you set the color temperature of the whites during the calibration process.

Why not contacting their sales team with your question?

Cheers,
Bernard
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Scott Martin
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« Reply #5 on: May 23, 2008, 08:33:12 AM »
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Color Eyes Display Pro (CEDP) should be perfect for you application. I'd suggest using it's "LCD Brightness only" setting for both displays and let it determine the final color temp for both displays. The fact that your 3007 doesn't have Contrast or RGB settings is a good thing and greatly simplifies the calibration process. For the other display, you'll need to leave the contrast and RGB settings at their native setting which you can get to by resetting the monitor. You will need to manually adjust the brightness of each display to get them to match.

Dual monitor setups can be a pain to troubleshoot on Windows. If you have both monitors connected via one video card it is unlikely that you'll be able to calibrate each display seperately. Having one video card for each display is preferable so that each display can have it's own LUT.
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Why not contacting their sales team with your question?[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=197340\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
FYI, Jack Bingham, who responded above is with Integrated Color who makes CEDP. His advice, as usual, is sound.
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jackbingham
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« Reply #6 on: May 25, 2008, 05:27:21 PM »
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Dual monitor setups can be a pain to troubleshoot on Windows. If you have both monitors connected via one video card it is unlikely that you'll be able to calibrate each display seperately. Having one video card for each display is preferable so that each display can have it's own LUT.

Scott, the issue with dual headed cards is not as you suggest. Most cards provide a means to support two profiles. If for instance the card appears as two cards in Device manager you are all set. ATI seems to have a different but still workable solution.

The best thing to do is test. Make one profile for each monitor at different color temp targets, for instance do monitor one at 6500 and do monitor two at 5000. Note the color difference. Now restart. if the monitors appear as they did before you are all set. If not there are two solutions, a second card, or the windows color applet. Note this is not an issue on Vista, just XP. And finally the windows color applet will not work with ddc monitors.

Finally I would suggest profiling the monitor with color controls to your target white point using precalibration measurements and the monitor osd. One the second monitor, I would measure the white point of the first monitor after profiling and use that as your target white point for monitor #2.
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Jack Bingham
Integrated Color Corp Makers of Coloreyes Display
johnchoy
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« Reply #7 on: May 31, 2008, 07:16:47 AM »
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I calibrated my Dell 3007HC and Eizo L768 using Coloreyes display pro ( windows XP x64) with very good result.   I use native white for the Dell and D65 for the Eizo. Both monitor can utilized DCC when I was using an ATI 1600 display card so no hardware calbration step is required. However, when I changed it to a ATI 2600XT, the dell lose the DCC capability so I have to use the "LCD Brightness only" setting.

For critical matching between the 2 monitor, I suggest using the program' "white point tuning " function after the profile was generated.

Dual monitor setups is easy and smooth in my case.
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Raw shooter
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« Reply #8 on: May 31, 2008, 09:44:39 AM »
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I calibrated my Dell 3007HC and Eizo L768 using Coloreyes display pro ( windows XP x64) with very good result.   I use native white for the Dell and D65 for the Eizo. Both monitor can utilized DCC when I was using an ATI 1600 display card so no hardware calbration step is required. However, when I changed it to a ATI 2600XT, the dell lose the DCC capability so I have to use the "LCD Brightness only" setting.

For critical matching between the 2 monitor, I suggest using the program' "white point tuning " function after the profile was generated.

Dual monitor setups is easy and smooth in my case.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=199104\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
I am wondering if the NVIDIA® GeForce® 9800 GTX can utilize DDC with ColorEyes.
Jack - if you are around, is there a list on your website of the cards that do work in Vista 32 in DDC mode?  BTW, I abandoned my downgrade to XP32, as the dual monitor didn't work properly.  I used the Microsoft Color Control Panel Applet for Windows XP, and it would keep disabling the NVIDIA driver.  So back to Vista 32 and the dual monitors work much better.
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jackbingham
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« Reply #9 on: June 01, 2008, 05:37:50 AM »
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"For critical matching between the 2 monitor, I suggest using the program' "white point tuning " function after the profile was generated."

I would suggest another approach particualrly since you have ddc on both monitors.
Profile the first to d65 if that is the target you want, then use the measure with sensor white point function. Open the measure tool on your second monitor, drag it across to the already profiled first monitor, hang the sensor and click measure. Now you have loaded the exact white point of the profiled monitor as a target for the second. This will be much easier and more precise than white point tuning.
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Jack Bingham
Integrated Color Corp Makers of Coloreyes Display
jackbingham
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« Reply #10 on: June 01, 2008, 05:39:51 AM »
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Quote from: Raw shooter,May 31 2008, 02:44 PM
I am wondering if the NVIDIA® GeForce® 9800 GTX can utilize DDC with ColorEyes.

There is a list of ddc supporting cards on our website. That does not necessarily mean ddc will work. Dell for instance changes monitor suppliers so often it's impossible to even try to keep up with changing communication protocols. That being said we have not released ddc support for Vista yet, although we are finally getting close.
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Jack Bingham
Integrated Color Corp Makers of Coloreyes Display
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