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Author Topic: Need help Fungus on H1D  (Read 17871 times)
TechTalk
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« Reply #40 on: June 06, 2008, 09:01:11 PM »
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If this condition ,FUNGUS, happened in the first year of service.HASSY should eat it and replace the glass on the sensor for FREE ! IMHO.
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Why should any manufacturer do that? Manufacturers make products. Nature makes fungus spores and the environment that sustains them.

What is it that makes the first responsible for the second?
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peteh
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« Reply #41 on: June 06, 2008, 10:11:17 PM »
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Why should any manufacturer do that? Manufacturers make products. Nature makes fungus spores and the environment that sustains them.

What is it that makes the first responsible for the second?
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Look at the humidity at the manufacturing point.It's 88% as I type.It seems others have has problems with the same thing.I really don't know who would be at at fault.BUT at 88% humidity it SEEMS to be a factory prob.Controlled conditions at the assembly point should no prob, for a factory assembling such a high priced product.
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Brent Daniels
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« Reply #42 on: June 06, 2008, 11:11:54 PM »
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TechTalk

What does your car being dinged or not being dinged have to do with fungus on the IR glass of a MFDB? Absolutely nothing. Maybe it was just random? Maybe someone knew it was your new car?

What does fungus on any other type of glass such as lens have to do with this very specific issue? Not much except it is glass. The question is why is the IR glass on MFDB prone to this problem? Most likely it is due to the make up of the IR glass, and the heating & cooling that it goes through as compared to lens glass.

Theirry from Sinar stated that Sinar had a fungus problem with a specific design of IR glass. Sinar switches from this particular glass, and bingo no more problems.

Hasselblad had no such know problems up till the full 645 22 mpx chip's glass. Then the problems started to show up in certain conditions. I however do not know if they switched IR glass design or supplier. With a new design that uses a lens type multicoating the issue may be once again gone.

This does not seem to be a pattern that is controlled only by shifting moons & car vandals. It is also an issue that should not be beyond the wiz bang engineers of the manufactures.

Brent Daniels
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Kitty
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« Reply #43 on: June 06, 2008, 11:42:59 PM »
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I don't know the truth. But if fungus on IR is the product problem.
Hasselblad should recall all the backs and replace free of charge even out of 1 year warranty.
This camera is not cheap.
We are lucky that we found cheap solution.
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Brent Daniels
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« Reply #44 on: June 06, 2008, 11:45:57 PM »
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peteh:

In Hasselblad's defence I should state that in the first instance of this fungus issue, which occurred within one year, the repair was done under warranty. Zero charge and a same model loner back given to me for the entire time the back was visiting Denmark. One could not ask for better service than that.

The second time the back was out of warranty. I was provided a loner back free of charge. There was no shipping charges and there was an added benefit of a CCD cleaning and back calibration. Yes there was a small charge, but nothing substantial. So I can have no complaints with that at all.

Hopefully next time they will try to entice me to upgrade by letting me play with the H3DII 39MS for 6 weeks. Hint! Hint!

With both services I believe the IR glass was replaced and not just cleaned. The newer glass design can not be fitted so we live with the situation as best possible.

These backs are built under strict conditions. Especially the CCD and IR glass portions which I think are done in a clean room situation. However I doubt the IR glass manufacturer has such control.

Cheers
Brent Daniels
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peteh
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« Reply #45 on: June 07, 2008, 01:27:59 AM »
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peteh:

In Hasselblad's defence I should state that in the first instance of this fungus issue, which occurred within one year, the repair was done under warranty. Zero charge and a same model loner back given to me for the entire time the back was visiting Denmark. One could not ask for better service than that.

The second time the back was out of warranty. I was provided a loner back free of charge. There was no shipping charges and there was an added benefit of a CCD cleaning and back calibration. Yes there was a small charge, but nothing substantial. So I can have no complaints with that at all.

Hopefully next time they will try to entice me to upgrade by letting me play with the H3DII 39MS for 6 weeks. Hint! Hint!

With both services I believe the IR glass was replaced and not just cleaned. The newer glass design can not be fitted so we live with the situation as best possible.

These backs are built under strict conditions. Especially the CCD and IR glass portions which I think are done in a clean room situation. However I doubt the IR glass manufacturer has such control.

Cheers
Brent Daniels
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IMHO ,QC all the way down the line or UP the line. HASSY sounds like a good Co.  One could go to the Moon and get on for free and possibly FUNGUS FREE.
I just, from reading all the posts  in the first topic that, SOMETHING was wrong in their chain of building the camera and or back. NO offense intended.
« Last Edit: June 07, 2008, 01:29:05 AM by peteh » Logged
TechTalk
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« Reply #46 on: June 07, 2008, 01:49:59 AM »
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TechTalk

What does your car being dinged or not being dinged have to do with fungus on the IR glass of a MFDB? Absolutely nothing. Maybe it was just random? Maybe someone knew it was your new car?

What does fungus on any other type of glass such as lens have to do with this very specific issue? Not much except it is glass. The question is why is the IR glass on MFDB prone to this problem? Most likely it is due to the make up of the IR glass, and the heating & cooling that it goes through as compared to lens glass.

Theirry from Sinar stated that Sinar had a fungus problem with a specific design of IR glass. Sinar switches from this particular glass, and bingo no more problems.

Hasselblad had no such know problems up till the full 645 22 mpx chip's glass. Then the problems started to show up in certain conditions. I however do not know if they switched IR glass design or supplier. With a new design that uses a lens type multicoating the issue may be once again gone.

This does not seem to be a pattern that is controlled only by shifting moons & car vandals. It is also an issue that should not be beyond the wiz bang engineers of the manufactures.

Brent Daniels
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Ah yes. The random, unpredictable nature of life. You could be right. Maybe that car damage was just a set of random and coincidental occurrences. I'm sorry I brought it up now.

Maybe the optics with fungus problems, that I've seen over the past few decades, were the result of a complex combination of random circumstances triggered by some specific conditions.

The questions that would be really interesting to ask and answer would be:
- How does a fungus spore attach to a surface?
- What is needed for a fungus spore to germinate and grow?
- What is required to sustain growth?
- Why do attempts to eradicate an established colony generally fail in the long term, resulting in eventual regeneration?
- What is known about fungus growth on optics?
- Is there a consensus of expert opinion on what optical materials may or may not contribute to creating favorable conditions for fungus growth?
- Are all optical surfaces vulnerable? Are some more vulnerable than others?

Let us know if you have any answers.

I'll add my own observations when I get up the energy, mood and time. Too many things that I consider more important than this right now.

Have fun.
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jerome_m
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« Reply #47 on: January 24, 2013, 08:21:00 AM »
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I know I am answering a 4 years old question, but when I looked for a solution a few days ago, google found this thread. Maybe the next person who will have the problem in 4 years will find this thread as well and will be happy to find an answer...

The problem I had was that the IR glass window on the sensor of a H3D was covered with peculiar gunk which indeed looked like fungus. Using sensor cleaning fluid on it would not remove it.

The correct solution is, of course, to send the back to Hasselblad in Sweden. They will exchange the IR window and recalibrate the back for a reasonable fee. I will probably do that eventually (there is dust on the other side of the glass as well). But if you live far away from Sweden, having the back correctly cleaned will take a long time. People may have an important shoot and want to try a temporary fix and send the back after the important shoot.

The gunk was very easy to clean with distilled water. Cleaning fluid or alcohol would not remove anything, but a wet wipe worked wonders. I was really surprised how much better plain distilled water worked. Just wet a tissue or two with water and wet the window with the tissue until the gunk dissolves, then wipe the gunk off with another clean, dry tissue. Be a bit careful so as not to drag residue and scratch the glass, of course.
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