Ad
Ad
Ad
Pages: « 1 [2]   Bottom of Page
Print
Author Topic: Flash on Safari  (Read 6378 times)
Tim Gray
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2002



WWW
« Reply #20 on: November 17, 2004, 07:37:02 AM »
ReplyReply

Better beamer was is also reviewed in this issues (11) of the VJ.  Quite inexpensive so I wouldn't hesitate...
Logged
Jonathan Wienke
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5759



WWW
« Reply #21 on: November 17, 2004, 04:20:28 PM »
ReplyReply

Quote
although to be honest it'll pretty much have to be a 420 as a 550/580 is just too much for me right now
You're spending how much on your trip to Africa, and can't afford to upgrade from a 420EX to a 550EX or 580EX??? Penny wise and pound foolish...
Logged

IanS
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 46


WWW
« Reply #22 on: November 17, 2004, 05:53:47 PM »
ReplyReply

Hi PaulS thanks again...

I had read through most of those articles and whilst the odd one or two mentioned taking a flash, none of them mentioned actually using it and any pictures of photographers taking pictures showed bodies minus flashguns...

So, given that to my meagre experience, getting rid of unwanted shadows normally means fill flash, (which I guess is the point of the better beamer for long distance) either use of the flash gun on safari is so second nature that it not worth mentioning or, it's not mentioned because generally it's not used...

Do you understand my point? Am I so inexperienced that I'm missing something really fundamental here?

Ian.
Logged
Paul Sumi
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1216


« Reply #23 on: November 17, 2004, 08:06:01 PM »
ReplyReply

Quote
So, given that to my meagre experience, getting rid of unwanted shadows normally means fill flash, (which I guess is the point of the better beamer for long distance) either use of the flash gun on safari is so second nature that it not worth mentioning or, it's not mentioned because generally it's not used...

Do you understand my point? Am I so inexperienced that I'm missing something really fundamental here?

Ian.
It sounds like you've done your homework.  Personally, I would at least take a flash and probably a better beamer-type device.  But, then again, I'm not going on my honeymoon!

Enjoy,

Paul
Logged

Dan Sroka
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 587


WWW
« Reply #24 on: November 26, 2004, 08:30:11 AM »
ReplyReply

Hi Ian,

Sorry for the late reply. I do not do much wildlife photography, but I did do a 4 week safari trip a few years back. Here's some thoughts for you.

In South Africa, where I was, the safari trips were first thing in the morning or last thing in the afternoon. You never went out during the middle of the day because it was too hot (and the animals are all hiding). So, lots of nice diffuse light.

My trips were all in a Land Rover. You are yards away from the animals at best, using a long zoom. Flash wouldn't help in these situations. Often, the best shots come up right when you are hitting a pot hole, so stability is key. Also, the conditions are extremely unpredictable. We had one leopard pose for us for 20 minutes on a perfectly lit branch, but that was rare. The animals (other than cats and waterbuffalo) are often moving constantly, so think of this as shooting a sporting event.

Rangers are very picky about what they allow you to use.I really doubt any would allow a flash of any sort -- the sudden bright light could scare the animals, which could then be dangerous.  They don't even want you to wear white shirts, because they are so unnatural and distracting. For example, we once happened apon some elelphants after dark. The ranger used his spot light, and gradually moved it along the ground towards the animals, so as not to startle them, briefly shined it on them (2 or 3 seconds) and moved it off. They are very careful about respecting the animals. (If they are not, don't go out with them.)

I also brought along a video camera with a IR light. Some of my best images are on the video, e.g. quick glimpses of a cheetah ducking into the brush that I would never have been fast enough to get on film. Especially since the most amazing part of seeing these animals is seeing them MOVE. The loping gait of a giraffe herd. The slow lumber of an elephant, turning into a quick charge. The spooky grace of the cats. My photos, though nice, are rather dull in comparison, and my wife and i often turn to the video for memories.

Hope this helps. Have fun!
Logged
IanS
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 46


WWW
« Reply #25 on: November 29, 2004, 12:39:49 PM »
ReplyReply

Hi Dan,

Thanks for your thoughts, it's always useful to hear others experiences. The anticipation is building!!

Ian.
Logged
IanS
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 46


WWW
« Reply #26 on: February 20, 2005, 03:24:55 PM »
ReplyReply

Only one flash photo for which the pop up did the job... !! Can you spot it??!!

Ian.
Logged
Pages: « 1 [2]   Top of Page
Print
Jump to:  

Ad
Ad
Ad