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Author Topic: Monitor Recommendation: post Artisan  (Read 12551 times)
kevs
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« Reply #20 on: June 23, 2008, 12:08:14 PM »
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thanks Andrew:
Can the Artisan last forever? If this issue comes back, can I send it in to Sony or a 3rd party for repair and trust it is up to par?

(you know what that popping and flickering and blurry monitor was?)
It lasted 2 hours and everything is now back to normal.
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digitaldog
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« Reply #21 on: June 23, 2008, 12:15:23 PM »
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thanks Andrew:
Can the Artisan last forever? If this issue comes back, can I send it in to Sony or a 3rd party for repair and trust it is up to par?

It will last almost forever if you never turn it on <g>.

Average life span of a CRT is about 3 years of 40 or so hours a week of use.

I seriously doubt you'll find anyone who can "fix it". When it does, time to move on.
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Andrew Rodney
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kevs
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« Reply #22 on: June 23, 2008, 02:41:59 PM »
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thanks Andrew.

I was told by Sony, the techs I called over there (when I got the monitor) that the lifespan of the Artisan is 30,000 hours of use. which would mean at least 7 years or so even if left on all day long.

Why wouldn't be repairable? TV's are repairable.

The issues have gone away. But the flickering/popping is an omen?
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madmanchan
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« Reply #23 on: June 23, 2008, 03:06:08 PM »
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The question is whether it'd be worth repairing ... (repairs can be pretty expensive sometimes).
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digitaldog
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« Reply #24 on: June 23, 2008, 03:17:28 PM »
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The question is whether it'd be worth repairing ... (repairs can be pretty expensive sometimes).
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=203176\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

And if the necessary parts are even available.
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Andrew Rodney
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kevs
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« Reply #25 on: June 23, 2008, 07:01:48 PM »
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Thanks Eric/Andrew:

Well if it was only a few hundred dollars I would probably do it as the 30" NEC (which is what I would want) is $2100, and being I have an older G5, I would need to spend another $600 for a new video card to handle the big monitor, right?

Again, that flickering/ popping blurry thing was maybe just a one time fluke?  It's pretty much gone away, knock on wood.
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digitaldog
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« Reply #26 on: June 24, 2008, 08:39:32 AM »
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I have an older G5, I would need to spend another $600 for a new video card to handle the big monitor, right?

Not sure. I can tell you I was able to drive the smaller NEC 2690 off a PowerBook, I'd have to assume you could do this off an existing G5 video card.

Oh wait, I'm driving the 2690 of a G5 now! Duh.
« Last Edit: June 24, 2008, 08:40:36 AM by digitaldog » Logged

Andrew Rodney
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kevs
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« Reply #27 on: June 24, 2008, 12:09:55 PM »
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Thanks, I bring it up because I know for sure with Apple's 30" you need a new video card. I wonder why that would not be with an NEC 30"?
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madmanchan
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« Reply #28 on: June 24, 2008, 07:44:48 PM »
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The 30" displays generally have a higher resolution of 2560 x 1600 pixels which requires dual-link DVI to drive. The NEC displays that Andrew and I have are "only" 1900 x 1200 and a good ol' regular DVI interface will drive it fine.
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kevs
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« Reply #29 on: June 25, 2008, 06:00:22 PM »
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Eric:
thanks, that's excellent news.
I'm a resolution moron, so my guess is that higher resolution should equal better quality, yet if you and Andrew have the NEC then my guess is probably wrong correct?  or maybe you have the NEC for many other reasons but would like the higher resolution?
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madmanchan
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« Reply #30 on: June 26, 2008, 07:41:58 AM »
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Eric:
thanks, that's excellent news.
I'm a resolution moron, so my guess is that higher resolution should equal better quality, yet if you and Andrew have the NEC then my guess is probably wrong correct?  or maybe you have the NEC for many other reasons but would like the higher resolution?
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=203689\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

The more pixels on the display, the more you can see without having things overlap or without having to scroll. For image editing this means you can see more of an image as well as having other palettes, windows, etc. off to the side without them getting in the way. In this sense, more is better.

The NEC is a good system, I've found, because the display is high-quality and so is the bundled colorimeter and software.
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SeanBK
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« Reply #31 on: June 26, 2008, 10:22:41 AM »
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Check out Gateway 30"  (extreme HD 1600p) monitor specs are real good & a lot cheaper too @ $1699.
http://www.gateway.com/accessories/product...272R.php?seg=hm
http://gizmodo.com/gadgets/one-screen-to-r...ther-307408.php
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kevs
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« Reply #32 on: June 26, 2008, 02:41:01 PM »
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Mad:
that hard to understand. If the NEC is 30" and the Apple is 30", then it's the same screen space for images and palettes, no??
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madmanchan
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« Reply #33 on: June 26, 2008, 08:58:45 PM »
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Not unless they have the same resolution in pixels. In this case I believe they do.

In general you can have two displays of the same physical size (e.g., 24") but different resolutions in pixels.
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Jonathan Wienke
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« Reply #34 on: June 26, 2008, 09:52:17 PM »
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What are others thoughts on the Mac 23" display?  or the Eizo 24"

I've recently started working in the photo department at the US Capitol, and my main project for the last few weeks has been replacing a hodgepodge of Barcos, Artisans, and various mystery meat LCD displays with 24" Eizos, and getting all of the printers and monitors calibrated and profiled with an Eye-One spectro. The Eizos are very nice monitors, and if you use their software to calibrate them internally, there is no display banding or posterization, and when calibrating monitors in a dual configuration, they will match very closely. The Eizos have an internal ambient light sensor, and automatically calibrate to a sensible luminance value for ambient light. They also have a very wide display angle with very little change in image contrast or color.

Cost is another matter; I have no idea how much the government paid for them. But I do know what I want for Christmas...
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Nill Toulme
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« Reply #35 on: June 26, 2008, 10:44:14 PM »
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... The Eizos have an internal ambient light sensor, and automatically calibrate to a sensible luminance value for ambient light. ...
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=203896\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
The NECs have something similar.  I have assumed that one would not want to use it, as there is no real control over the luminance value of the display that way, but I will admit I haven't tried it.  Andrew, have you tried it on your 2690?  What's your view on use of this feature?

EDIT:  Well that's interesting... I just checked and see that I have "Use Auto Luminance (if supported)" checked on.  I recently reinstalled my whole system from scratch and had overlooked that setting.  What exactly, if anything, is it doing?  (It doesn't appear to be doing anything at all.)

FURTHER EDIT:  Ah, the answer is in the 1.0.42 ReadMe:  "Added Preferences option for using Auto Luminance feature (available on the NEC LCD2490WUXi, LCD2690WUXi, and LCD3090WQXi)."  That doesn't include my 2090uxi.  Wonder why not?  I think it has the hardware capability, at least in some measure.

YET ANOTHER EDIT:  And the answer to that question is found in the User's Guide:  "Use Auto Luminance (if available) - enables the Auto Luminance sensor inside the the display monitor to increase the Intensity (brightness) stability as the display ages and warms up. This feature will not be used for Targets with 'Maximum Possible' Intensity selected, or if the Target Intensity falls outside the range that the Auto Luminance circuit is capable of controlling. This feature is only available on the following models: LCD2490WUXi, LCD2690WUXi and LCD3090WQXi."  So this feature has nothing whatsoever to do with adjusting for ambient light levels.  Never mind.

Nill
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« Last Edit: June 26, 2008, 11:54:48 PM by Nill Toulme » Logged
digitaldog
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« Reply #36 on: June 27, 2008, 08:10:18 AM »
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The NECs have something similar.

The question is, what's reasonable, based on what and does it at all correlate to the viewing conditions?

Ideally, what we need is an ambient light reading that's based on viewing conditions and takes overall ambient light near the display into account (to tell us if indeed that part is reasonable) AND we need to measure the paper white for soft proof compensation (for UV among other things) that gets handed in the printer profile. And the entire chain (display, printer profile, soft proof) all have to work intelligently together. As far as I know, no one's doing that... yet.
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Andrew Rodney
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WillH
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« Reply #37 on: June 27, 2008, 08:17:57 AM »
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There are actually 2 different backlight control functions on the NEC 90 series displays:

1. The "Auto Luminance" function which you described. The purpose of this feature is to regulate the LCD backlight to reduce variations due to the display warming up and aging.

2. "Auto Brightness" which uses an ambient light sensor on the front of the monitor to adjust the screen brightness accordingly. It is intended more for casual use rather than in a critical color environment - which should have controlled lighting anyway. The last thing you want in that case is the monitor varying itself throughout the day. It is however good for say an office or home environment where you want to avoid being blinded by a display at night, or want to save power by not having the display brighter than it needs to be for the current lighting conditions.

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The NECs have something similar.  I have assumed that one would not want to use it, as there is no real control over the luminance value of the display that way, but I will admit I haven't tried it.  Andrew, have you tried it on your 2690?  What's your view on use of this feature?
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=203904\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
« Last Edit: June 27, 2008, 08:22:48 AM by WillH » Logged

Will Hollingworth
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NEC Display Solutions of America, Inc.
Nill Toulme
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« Reply #38 on: June 27, 2008, 09:27:22 AM »
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...2. "Auto Brightness" which uses an ambient light sensor on the front of the monitor to adjust the screen brightness accordingly. It is intended more for casual use rather than in a critical color environment - which should have controlled lighting anyway. The last thing you want in that case is the monitor varying itself throughout the day. ...
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=203974\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
Ah, that's what I was thinking of.  So I didn't dream it after all.  Thanks.  ;-)

Nill
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