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Author Topic: Scratch on front element of EF17-40mm L  (Read 6781 times)
ARD
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« on: September 08, 2005, 06:23:51 AM »
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The sneaky way would be to go and buy another lens, then take your scratched one back in it's place, complain to the store that they sold you a scratched lens and ask for a refund.

or is that dishonest  :angry:
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pfigen
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« Reply #1 on: September 08, 2005, 01:03:51 PM »
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Front element scratches are always worse on wide angle lenses than telephotos while rear element scratches are worse on teles. The more you stop down and the closer you focus with your front element scratch, the more likely you are to start seeing it. If it's just a coating scratch, it will likely be less noticeable than a deeper scratch into the glass itself.
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Jonathan Wienke
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« Reply #2 on: September 09, 2005, 07:50:22 AM »
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The sneaky way would be to go and buy another lens, then take your scratched one back in it's place, complain to the store that they sold you a scratched lens and ask for a refund.

or is that dishonest
Yes it is dishonest, and yes, your suggestion to do so reflects badly on your character. You are suggesting that one shift the financial burden of one's own mistake to either the camera retailer or lens manufacturer. In the absence of an extended warranty that specifically covers accidental damage, such an action is fraud, and would be illegal. The odds of being prosecuted may be fairly low, but you're still advocating an illegal act in most jurisdictions.
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BobMcCarthy
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« Reply #3 on: September 09, 2005, 10:30:22 AM »
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I recollect reading somewhere that a dab of black pen on a front element scratch would disguise any flare orignating from the blemish. Anyone tried this?
Tony Collins

Tony,

The black pen idea does work. The light falling in the area of the scratch is blocked and the effect of the scratch is negated but for a small loss of contrast.

But, I could never do it as it kills the resale value of the lens for most folks and just puts in my head, that I'm not getting the best from the lens.

Bob
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dmerger
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« Reply #4 on: September 09, 2005, 01:35:34 PM »
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Ard's response to my initial post dispels any notion that his suggestion was in jest or intended as a joke.  I can't understand how anyone could conclude otherwise or tolerate Ard's statements.
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Dean Erger
macgyver
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« Reply #5 on: September 09, 2005, 02:34:11 PM »
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I always keep a UV filter on my lenses just so things like this don't happen.  Is that a generally good idea?

-macgyver
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philthygeezer
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« Reply #6 on: September 07, 2005, 06:03:17 PM »
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Turns out I just put a 5mm - long scratch on the front element of my EF17-40mm L, about 1/2 way from center to the edge.

I've never scratched a lens since 1996!  This lens is only 9 months old, and it was the sharpest of 5 that I tried.  Sad

Will the scratch affect my image quality?  Should I have the front element replaced and would it be covered under warranty repairs?  

   Sad
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Paul Williamson
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« Reply #7 on: September 08, 2005, 01:21:41 AM »
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Take some test shots and find out. You might be surprised how little degradation you get from a single isolated scratch. I predict you won't be able to see the effect, except possibly as a slight loss in contrast when the light source shines on the lens surface.

I trust you'll forgive me if I don't go put a 5mm scratch on one of my own lenses to confirm my answer before posting. Let us know what you find with your scratched lens.
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Eric Myrvaagnes
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« Reply #8 on: September 08, 2005, 10:44:35 AM »
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The sneaky way would be to go and buy another lens, then take your scratched one back in it's place, complain to the store that they sold you a scratched lens and ask for a refund.

or is that dishonest
Maybe that's why the camera stores I know put the serial number of the lens on the sales slip.

I put (accidentally) a substantial scratch on a fine 300 mm lens for my 8x10 view camera a few years ago, and it turned out to make no visible difference in my photos. Of course I was generally stopped pretty well down. The scratch made the biggest difference in the price when I sold it .

Eric
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dmerger
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« Reply #9 on: September 08, 2005, 12:52:16 PM »
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Ard, yes it would be dishonest.  Just who do you think would bear the cost with your suggestion?  The local camera store owner?  Is that fair?  I suspect that your suggestion shows much about your character or lack thereof.
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Dean Erger
ARD
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« Reply #10 on: September 09, 2005, 03:44:54 AM »
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Ard, yes it would be dishonest. Just who do you think would bear the cost with your suggestion? The local camera store owner? Is that fair? I suspect that your suggestion shows much about your character or lack thereof.
Sorry Vicar, and no, it would be Canon who bore the cost, and their production costs for the lens would be a few dollars.

Do not judge my character based on a thread I have posted here. I gave an option that most would explore as lenses cost a lot of money.

Also, it would go back to Canon for a new front lens and be sold as new again.

I am not getting into a flaming situation over this, but I would ask that you think about your writings prior to characterising me.
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Tony Collins
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« Reply #11 on: September 09, 2005, 06:14:09 AM »
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I recollect reading somewhere that a dab of black pen on a front element scratch would disguise any flare orignating from the blemish. Anyone tried this?
Tony Collins
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bob mccarthy
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« Reply #12 on: September 09, 2005, 07:25:27 AM »
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The location of the scratch is very important. In the center its a disaster, on the edge, likely inconsequencal. Halfway out, it will only show up wide open or down a stop or two. Look at any old glass, its full of bubbles and internal defects. They were just expected and certainly had minimal effect on the image.

Is the scratch minor or significant in depth?

If significant in any way, I would send it to the repair department. It "might" cause an unintended effect in the "perfect" shot of the shoot of a lifetime. One where you need all the capabilities of the lens. Sunrise/set perfect light, shooting wide open, light is falling across the front of the lens at an acute angle. Your head is into the capture.

"####, I forgot to stop down to eliminate the flare from the scratch"

Been there - done that in slightly different circumstances.

Bob
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howard smith
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« Reply #13 on: September 09, 2005, 08:02:30 AM »
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How would ARD feel if he bought a lens and discovered it was scratvhed, and the dealer and Canon refused to take it back.  Ripped off I would guess.  Why should the retailer and Canon feel any different.
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howard smith
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« Reply #14 on: September 09, 2005, 09:40:23 AM »
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Bob, I have never heard of this either.  It was merely an example.  But it is dishonest to take advantage.  Nordstrom's take back anything for any reason.  I knew a guy who returned a year's old pair of Levi's with holes and paint stains becasue the zipper broke.  I thought that was pushing a good policy, and may spoil it for others.
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BobMcCarthy
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« Reply #15 on: September 09, 2005, 02:00:00 PM »
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Re: Scratch

Can you post some shots of the scratch on the lens, and some shots of how it affects your pictures?

I'm curious about the real-world effects of scratches/blemishes on lenses.

Put a camera on a tripod shooting at something overhead.

Put small pieces of white monofilamant and black thread on the lens.

Shoot at various apertures.

Bet its hard to see much effect unless the debris is centered and at a small F/stop.

I have some old Nikon/Canon/Leitz lenses from the 50's and 60's with lots of air bubbles in the glass.

Still shooting wonderful pix if I do my part.

Its mostly a value situation unless the scratch is deep and then its a problem.

We should ask the optical guru.

Bob
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LesGirrior
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« Reply #16 on: September 09, 2005, 11:37:23 AM »
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Re: ARD

I think people are taking what sounded like a joke (to me) a bit too seriously.

I thought it was pretty funny, myself.  Lets all hug and be friends.

/hug

Re: Scratch

Can you post some shots of the scratch on the lens, and some shots of how it affects your pictures?

I'm curious about the real-world effects of scratches/blemishes on lenses.
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Hank
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« Reply #17 on: September 09, 2005, 12:54:45 PM »
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It's amazing to me that anyone would damage a product through neglect, then try to blame the dealer or mfr.  

It's even more amazing that the morality would merit discussion.  

How would you feel if someone bought a lens from you, scratched it, then brought it back and demanded a refund?

What a world.
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howard smith
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« Reply #18 on: September 09, 2005, 02:30:23 PM »
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Just a hunch, but I wouldn't expect a UV filter to help at all - now.  A lens shade might help keep stray light off the scratch though.

Just a wild idea.  My wife's car had a chip in the windshield.  The insurance paid to have it "fixed" with a glue like filler.  Couldn't see the scratch anymore.  However, this might do unspeakable things to the coating around the scratch if the glue got on it and had to be removed.

My advice would be to try it with the scratch.  If it doesn't show, leave it alone.  If you can see a difference, get a new one and sell the old on as a very used lens.
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howard smith
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« Reply #19 on: September 09, 2005, 02:39:48 PM »
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I thought the enquirary had to do with now that the lens is scratched.  As for the UV filter insurance, that is a very personal solution.  Some do, some don't, some use a shade or lens cap.  I use the shade and lens cap.  Nevedr had a scratch.
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