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Author Topic: Where is this?  (Read 4608 times)
rgs
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« on: June 24, 2008, 08:22:49 PM »
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Guess the locations.

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RGS
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Petrjay
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« Reply #1 on: June 28, 2008, 07:41:20 AM »
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The Zorg River Valley on Mars. My ex-wife was born not far from there.
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rgs
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« Reply #2 on: June 28, 2008, 09:51:27 AM »
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Man! I didn't think anyone would guess!

RGS
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rgs
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« Reply #3 on: July 06, 2008, 03:02:25 PM »
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Well, I guess I strung this out long enough. They're all from Oklahoma. The first one is Lake Lugert in Quartz Mtn SP (SW Oklahoma).

The second one is Post Oak falls in the Wichita Mtns NWR in SW Oklahoma. The falls is about 30 feet high and usually just a trickle but the little pool at the bottom is nice and it feeds Post Oak creek which runs into Post Oak Lake; shown in the last image with Elk Mountain in the distance.

The third one is Red Rock Canyon SP in the central part of Oklahoma.

Thanks for your patience with my little game. I hope you have enjoyed the photos.

RGS
Richard Smith Photography
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dmerger
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« Reply #4 on: July 06, 2008, 04:26:42 PM »
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Very scenic and not what I'd expect from Oklahoma.  The photos didn't look like the Colorado Plateau, but I had no idea where you took the photos.
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Dean Erger
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« Reply #5 on: July 07, 2008, 02:20:42 PM »
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Agreed, very scenic. Looks like you've got some great landscape material to work with out that way. Obviously the West, but I never would have guessed Oklahoma. Of course I've never been there - there could be tropical rain forests or glaciers surrounding Tulsa for all I know.
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rgs
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« Reply #6 on: July 07, 2008, 08:16:15 PM »
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Thanks for your comments. We sometimes have a public relations problem here so I hoped my little guessing game might secure a good introduction for the state. Thanks for looking.

Oklahoma often surprises people. The most frequent comment is "I didn't expect it to be so green."

We have a very diverse landscape here. The east is wooded with Appalachian type mountains and pine forests. As you move west, it progress through plains to the beginnings of the American Southwest. There is just about every type of terrain here except Alpine type mountains. Here in Oklahoma City, I am only about an hour or less away from many very different types of landscape. I am told we have a larger variety of plant and animal life than any other state our size. It's really a good place to visit (or live).

RGS
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Dale Matthews
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« Reply #7 on: July 07, 2008, 10:31:34 PM »
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I'll be visiting the Tulsa area in a couple of weeks.  Can you suggest anything in the way of scenic landscapes in that part of the State?
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rgs
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« Reply #8 on: July 07, 2008, 11:32:32 PM »
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Tulsa is in a very wooded, hilly area. We've had a lot of rain and everything should be very green. The old part of town is nice although lately some parts seem a bit rundown. The suburban areas are just like in any other city. If you like architecture, there are some interesting buildings downtown, especially the Boston Avenue Methodist Church. It's just magnificent.

Oklahoma changes dramatically from east to west and Tulsa is still in the Eastern woodlands part of the state. Highway 412 east from Tulsa is a beautiful road all the way to the Arkansas border at Siloam Springs. Be sure to take the older highway. The new turnpike is faster but not nearly as interesting. If you get as far as West Siloam Springs, I would want to go to Natural Falls State Park. I just recently found out about this place and have not yet been able to go but it has been highly recommended to me.

Great Salt Plains State Park is west of Tulsa. The salt plains is weird; almost a moonscape. But the area around it is nice and it's one of the best places in the country to find migratory birds, even pelicans and no ocean at hand!

If you keep going west on 412 it'll start looking very "old western", but that's a long drive from Tulsa.

It's only a short drive east to Muskcogee which is a nice town to visit. In that area you could see Fort Gibson lake and visit the old stockade style fort as well as a trip to the old Cherokee capitol of Tahlequah. Lots of historical and Native American things in that part of the state, if that's of interest.

There are lots of other places, check the department of tourism OK State Parks or check with some locals in Tulsa.

Sorry this post is so long. Hope you enjoy your trip.

RGS
Richard Smith Photography
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Dale Matthews
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« Reply #9 on: July 11, 2008, 06:42:20 PM »
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Thanks Richard!

Looks like plenty to keep me shooting when I manage to slip away for a shoot.

Dale

Quote
Tulsa is in a very wooded, hilly area. We've had a lot of rain and everything should be very green. The old part of town is nice although lately some parts seem a bit rundown. The suburban areas are just like in any other city. If you like architecture, there are some interesting buildings downtown, especially the Boston Avenue Methodist Church. It's just magnificent.

Oklahoma changes dramatically from east to west and Tulsa is still in the Eastern woodlands part of the state. Highway 412 east from Tulsa is a beautiful road all the way to the Arkansas border at Siloam Springs. Be sure to take the older highway. The new turnpike is faster but not nearly as interesting. If you get as far as West Siloam Springs, I would want to go to Natural Falls State Park. I just recently found out about this place and have not yet been able to go but it has been highly recommended to me.

Great Salt Plains State Park is west of Tulsa. The salt plains is weird; almost a moonscape. But the area around it is nice and it's one of the best places in the country to find migratory birds, even pelicans and no ocean at hand!

If you keep going west on 412 it'll start looking very "old western", but that's a long drive from Tulsa.

It's only a short drive east to Muskcogee which is a nice town to visit. In that area you could see Fort Gibson lake and visit the old stockade style fort as well as a trip to the old Cherokee capitol of Tahlequah. Lots of historical and Native American things in that part of the state, if that's of interest.

There are lots of other places, check the department of tourism OK State Parks or check with some locals in Tulsa.

Sorry this post is so long. Hope you enjoy your trip.

RGS
Richard Smith Photography
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