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Author Topic: Sunglasses with polarized lenses  (Read 4095 times)
Jonathan Wienke
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« on: June 12, 2005, 07:16:54 PM »
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Congratulations, you have just discovered the benefits of a polarizing filter.
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JJP
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« Reply #1 on: June 13, 2005, 06:09:28 AM »
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Believe it or not, I own a couple of polarizing filters and know what they're for and how to use them, but I didn't know/realize that when you're searching for compositions you should do so with you're sun glasses off...haven't read that anywhere, or been taught that by anyone.
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JJ
Gary_Berg
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« Reply #2 on: June 13, 2005, 11:36:07 AM »
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Just be sure to remove your polarizing sunglasses before you work with a camera with an electronic viewfinder or work with the LCD. At the right angle, the image disappears completely...

You'd probably believe how paniced I was when my camera "died" while on an Alaska vacation...
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Gary_Berg
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« Reply #3 on: June 13, 2005, 07:51:58 PM »
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I was sure that the backlight on my EVF had died; I could just sort of see a few things dimly.

Actually, my Canon Pro 90 blanked out the EVF with my polarized sunglasses in landscape mode; my K-M A2 blanks out in portrait mode. At least that way your more likely to notice what is happening...
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JJP
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« Reply #4 on: June 12, 2005, 05:52:50 PM »
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It hit me like a ton of bricks.  It was bright and sunny this morning and I was out with the camera with my sunglasses on and searching for some new compositions, reflections from puddles of water etc...
On our waterfront, there are commercial fishing boats/cutters on the beach.  The ice hasn't gone yet so all these boats are still laying on the beach with their hulls mostly flooded from last winter melted ice and snow.  One of them was full of water and the front/cabin of the boat shaded the rear of the boat where the water was.  Hum I thought...this may be a photographic opportunity.  But while composing images, I accidently discovered that the details of the reflections on the above water in boat were hidden when I had my sunglasses on.  I don't know if it was because of the polarized lenses or the darkness of the lenses.  
jules
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JJ
BlasR
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« Reply #5 on: June 12, 2005, 08:02:16 PM »
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Congratulations,
Woww

BlasR

BMRWorldPhtos.com
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Jonathan Wienke
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« Reply #6 on: June 13, 2005, 09:36:49 AM »
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Polarized sunglasses are polarizers. It makes no difference if it's a sunglass lens or a camera filter, a polarizer will work the same way.
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JJP
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« Reply #7 on: June 13, 2005, 12:08:08 PM »
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Gary,
No kidding. Maybe they should make polarized sunglasses with lenses that can rotate the way polarized filters do!
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JJ
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