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Author Topic: ND grad filter use with 1Ds spot metering and expo  (Read 3773 times)
Jonathan Wienke
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« on: September 18, 2003, 08:33:24 PM »
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I would highly recommend not using a ND grad filter, instead, put the camera on a tripod and shoot some bracketed frames, then blend them together in Photoshop. You don't have to worry about aligning the filter with the subject, and if your tripod is rigid enough, the frames will line up exactly. Use aperture priority or manual mode and do a 3-shot bracket 1-2 stops apart, depending on the subject. Michael posted a handy tutorial on blending exposures, and there are many other places you can get instructions on how to do this.

BTW, the distillery shot on the front page is a blended exposure. Try doing that with a ND grad filter!
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Jerry Williams
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« Reply #1 on: September 21, 2003, 03:33:40 PM »
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I tend to agree with Edward. These are methods I use for outdoor any weather photography. Its the method that I am using that I am questioning. It should do a fine job right?

If you have a more automated process without going into manual mode I'd love to hear it. Anyone?

Jerry
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Jerry Williams
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« Reply #2 on: September 22, 2003, 03:09:27 PM »
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Thanks Edward that would make sense. Another question.
Do you, when preferable ,always use your polarizer?

 I like the look of the polarizer with the ND grad but the skies can become really intense. (You see I not trying to be creative here just want to shoot it the way I see it.) Once I feel I have control over this wonderful tool then I'll know that I achieved what I intended to do.

Your comments please,
Jerry
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Jerry Williams
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« Reply #3 on: September 17, 2003, 07:50:13 PM »
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Hi everyone,

I started using a Lee ND grad setup on my 1Ds. I need to check out if what I'm proceeding with in method will give me the optimum results.
1. I use the spot meter to measure the difference between bright skies and normal frontal ground composition.
2.The side bars for example indicate four bars differance between the two memory markers for example.
3. I use this to tell me that I will need a 3 or 4 stop grad to balance the sky in the photo.
4.I then reset the spot meter and read the average foreground which I lock with the the appropriate star button.
I should also note that I have given myself 30 seconds afterwards to set the grad up properly on the horizon and click!
Results using the grad with a polarizer (included in the spot reading) do render incredible detail and color but I sometimes find the foregrounds correct exposure needing slight contrast adlustments to render what I like.

Is this O.K. or is there a better way that someone may wish to share with me. Or is there something incorrect in my approach.

Thanks for info,

Jerry
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Edward
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« Reply #4 on: September 18, 2003, 10:55:52 PM »
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The blended image technique is great, but I find that unless you have a perfectly calm day or are photographing rocks, moving trees and clouds can really complicate blended images.
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Edward
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« Reply #5 on: September 22, 2003, 08:50:48 AM »
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I suspect that the number of stops of compensation you have to use to keep the highlights from clipping is pretty close to what you need for the ND filter.  With a digital camera you can take a quick series of exposures to find out the minimun exposure to keep the shadows and the max to keep the highlights, and difference should be the ND filter reading.
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