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Author Topic: Understanding Video  (Read 5466 times)
vandevanterSH
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« on: September 01, 2008, 11:45:59 AM »
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I just finished reading the "Understanding Video" mini-tutorial and it is excellent.  I have made a few attempts to understand what is going on in consumer video and gave up because of all of the variables made my eyes glaze over.  If I so desire, I now have enough information from reading Michael's  piece to know where to start to get involved with video.

Steve
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LughClyde
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« Reply #1 on: September 01, 2008, 04:22:02 PM »
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Nice article. I think it was at the right level for most still photographers who haven't touched video yet.

My only correction would be the definition of "High End". Those cameras that you put in that category are really the low end of pro video. The real high end goes a lot higher than those. You probably know that, but it is a good comparison with still equipment. Well, kind of...

One of the shocks of moving from still to video is the cost of video equipment. EVERYTHING seems to cost a LOT more in video than it does in still. I'm not sure why, but it may be a much lower demand. Hopefully when this convergence happens, it will drag down the cost of the video world.

I would like to second and emphasize a couple of your points that are much bigger jumps than most still photographers imagine.

One is the story telling. It is an absolute must in video and nothing we did in still prepares us for that. Oh we thought we were telling stories with still projects, but compared to video it was like telling a story with a few pretty phrases thrown together. We rarely ever did still photography to the level of full sentences. We never really got to the point of full paragraphs and certainly weren't at the level of chapters organized into a book. Still photography can only show frozen moments of any story. To tell a full and flowing story in video takes a very large learning curve. Yes, I know we all watch movies, but we don't do so in a way that analyzes them.

The other point I'm seconding it that of sound. We do underestimate that in video and have to learn the hard way how important it is. Capturing it and editing is another learning curve for still photographers. It gets even more complex when you realize how critical sound is to the story telling.

Good article,
Clyde
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Mike W
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« Reply #2 on: September 01, 2008, 04:45:07 PM »
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I loved it, I've been a interested spectator of the whole convergence thing and this sums up a lot of important aspects. I can imagine a lot of people getting interested in video after reading this article.

Michael, great job.
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thewanderer
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« Reply #3 on: September 02, 2008, 12:11:10 AM »
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it answerd a lot of the techno stuff and put in perspective some of the finer points for sure,, i looked into thinking about adding video to my activiites but got overwhelmed by the terminology an what was needed and what people tell you, this was nice and concise.. i do wildlife photogoraphy, and thought about getting one of the hd handhelds for the 1200 price range adn strpping to the tripod while i shot still, but so many times i need and use a 600,  and the range of the digigtal video wouldnt be enough, or useful,
and gave up the idea,, plus the addl edititing.       btw, is HD now a "requirement" for recreational use, ?
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michael
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« Reply #4 on: September 02, 2008, 02:44:44 AM »
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Syncing of sound with an external audio recorder is a non-issue. These are all now crystal controlled and should drift little more than a few frames per 10-15 minutes, so even lip sync interviews should be fine. Just put a clapper at the head of the shot (even something as obvious as a person slapping their palm on the table) so that a start point for audio and video can be found.

Good NLE programs (non linear editing) such as Final Cut can handle mixed format footage with no problem.

Autofocus is a non-issue. No one who's serious about shooting video keeps their camera in autofocus mode while shooting (unless it's a really uncontrolled situation such as a street demonstration - called "run and gun"). Too much risk of something moving in the shot and fooling the AF. Same with auto-iris (exposure) and white balance. Set them before each shot or they'll "pump" while filming.

Video requires different ways of thinking and working. One has to learn some new paradigms, not carry forward old ones.

Michael
« Last Edit: September 03, 2008, 08:15:19 PM by michael » Logged
Paul Kerfoot
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« Reply #5 on: September 03, 2008, 12:28:21 PM »
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Very good article Michael.  

   I  love it when you don't sugar coat. Hopefully, the next major revisions of NLE's will directly edit AVCHD even if it takes a major rewrite and the purchase of a fast computer.  I have been trying to justify a Mac Pro for some time now.  

 

Paul Kerfoot
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jjj
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« Reply #6 on: September 21, 2008, 06:17:55 PM »
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Quote
One is the story telling. It is an absolute must in video and nothing we did in still prepares us for that. Oh we thought we were telling stories with still projects, but compared to video it was like telling a story with a few pretty phrases thrown together. We rarely ever did still photography to the level of full sentences. We never really got to the point of full paragraphs and certainly weren't at the level of chapters organized into a book. Still photography can only show frozen moments of any story. To tell a full and flowing story in video takes a very large learning curve.
Cannot be emphasied enough. I learned to write screenplays a while back and only then did I finally 'grok' filmaking. Everything, absolutely everything in film production is subservient to the story.
Well to clarify, it should be, sadly often isn't and that's why so many bad films get made.

Quote
The other point I'm seconding it that of sound. We do underestimate that in video and have to learn the hard way how important it is. Capturing it and editing is another learning curve for still photographers. It gets even more complex when you realize how critical sound is to the story telling.
Get the sound right and the photography looks better. Easiest way to make a film bad is to mess up sound.
Technically poor photography can be part of the story telling, technically poor sound, just seems bad 99% of the time and cheapens entire production.
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