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Author Topic: Major Help Please !! Image very Saturated in CS3  (Read 3271 times)
petekd
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« on: September 04, 2008, 01:39:24 AM »
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Hi all

Im new here so thanks in advance to anyone offering their help.

Here is my problem

I have a Nikon D300 and I am a wedding/portrait  photographer I have found my images shot Jpeg are very very saturated with skin tones being extremeley red almost crazy looking. Here is my set up and colour management settings etc..below so what on earth is going wrong ?? I would really appreciate your help

1. My camera is set to portrait mode saturation default sharpness +4 W/B Auto the most recent shots were on a sunny day but not a hot day

2. My Monitor is a HPw19ev stationed in a nautral envoironment

3. My monitor is caliberated with gretamacbeth eye one

4. CS3 is set up correct with colour management set to working space
    sRGB EIC619
5. I let photoshop manage print etc..

6. I know you are not suposed to use the monitors profile for proof viewing but if I soft proof using the monitors profile generated by eye one and tick the preserve RGB numbers box the image looks a little flatter but more normal like especially skin.


I have the Luminous camera to print Video (which is great) and have studied there settings so I understand mostly how things work.

If anyone wants a sample image to view on their PC let me know and I will email you.

One final thing which is crazy. If I open the image in Nikon NX2 capture and look at the thumbnail it looks OK  but when I open it up fully by its side looking at the enlarged thumbnail and opened photo the colours look totaly diffent to each other. Does this mean the thumbnails in NX2 are not colour managed and the opened one is Huh?  I must add the opened one looks the same as in CS3

This is really driving me nuts and has been for sometime, My friend has a D300 and it seems the same with his camera

Looking forward to some replies.

Cheers Pete UK
www.petedavis-photography.com
« Last Edit: September 04, 2008, 01:51:56 AM by petekd » Logged
Nick Rains
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« Reply #1 on: September 04, 2008, 02:04:45 AM »
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If anyone wants a sample image to view on their PC let me know and I will email you.

Post a small jpeg here, one that looks like you describe. Then maybe someone will be able to help more.
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Nick Rains
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ddk
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« Reply #2 on: September 04, 2008, 03:42:20 AM »
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If anyone wants a sample image to view on their PC let me know and I will email you.

Send me a sample and I'll have a go.

david
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Mark D Segal
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« Reply #3 on: September 04, 2008, 07:18:23 AM »
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First, to diagnose whether the problem begins with how the camera is processing jpegs versus errors in your settings, I recommend that you select a human test subject and make some exposures in both raw and jpeg format simultaneously. Then open them both in Lightroom or in Camera Raw CS3 and compare what you are starting with. Process the raw file to your satisfaction and see whether this solves the problem. If it does, shoot raw and then later on you can make jpegs from the processed raw images if you need that format for any particular reason.

I don't use a Nikon, so I don't know Nikon's raw converter, hence I don't know  whether some settings you are using there may be the root of the problem.

Second, by using the sRGB colour space, you are sacrificing colour information you may wish to have at some time. Try at least using Adobe RGB(98), especially for the raw files. If your images are only going to be posted to the web this is less of an issue, but if you are printing them say using something like an Epson K3 inkset, you want to begin with a colour space considerably wider than sRGB.

Third, you should NOT soft-proof an image destined for a printer with your display profile; absolutely use the profile for the printer and paper combination you will be using, and TURN OFF "Preserve RGB numbers".

Forth, I assume you are making sure that when you have Photoshop managing colour you have Printer Colour Management turned OFF in the printer driver.

Once you've tried all that, let us know how things look.
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Mark D Segal (formerly MarkDS)
Author: "Scanning Workflows with SilverFast 8....." http://www.luminous-landscape.com/reviews/film/scanning_workflows_with_silverfast_8.shtml
Andrew Fee
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« Reply #4 on: September 07, 2008, 04:22:42 AM »
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I would start by double-checking your settings for Photoshop. Go to Image → Colour Settings.

I'm using CS2 on a Mac, but the options should be the same, and this is what I use:

You should be working in either Adobe RGB or ProPhoto RGB with an SLR. If you're shooting JPEG, make sure the camera is set to Adobe RGB and use that.

If you are using ProPhoto RGB (RAW files) grey gamma should be 1.8, if you are using Adobe RGB as the working space, grey gamma should be 2.2. This has nothing to do with what your monitor is calibrated to.

Ensure that your colour management policies are set up to preserve embedded profiles—this is absolutely critical. If you choose not to have Photoshop notify you about profile mismatches, it will use the embedded profile by default. (I can't think of a case where you would want to do anything else)

The option to desaturate monitor colours must be disabled, and the blend setting is optional.


The only thing with working in Adobe RGB or ProPhoto RGB is that you have to be careful to convert the images to sRGB before saving if they are going to the web. In CS3, I believe it now does this automatically if you use the ‘save for web’ feature.


If you are still seeing oversaturated images with Photoshop set up like this, then you need to change your camera settings.
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odyocu
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« Reply #5 on: September 08, 2008, 02:45:16 PM »
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I had seen some Q+A stuff in the Adobe site. In my case (Epson R2400 printer), it seems that the only way to print correctly was to let the printer take control (using the appropriate printer profile). In case of PS taking the control, and setting the printer to ICM (with no color control option) Adobe advised thet Epson printer profile was still active and some double correction was being done.

This seems specific to my printer. Just wanted you to know.

Now I print either with color controls by printer with gamma set to 2.2, or with ICM using the correct profile, with PS color control being off.

I still can't print as good as I used to print with the same hardware as I did with Windows XP. "upgrading" to Vista created problems in my case. (I also had to update my printer profiles, software etc. I don't know which is to be blamed.

Seyhun
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Ben08
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« Reply #6 on: October 02, 2008, 06:04:15 PM »
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Petekd, this sounds like what happens when images with an Adobe1998 profile get mistakenly opened in sRGB. Is your camera processing jpegs in Adobe 1998? If so, and you have your Photoshop color settings defaulting to sRGB (with the profile mismatch "ask when opening" check box unchecked), Photoshop will open the Adobe1998 image but treat it like it is sRGB, causing the hyper-saturation you describe. I always check mark all of the color management boxes (see image) so Photoshop will ask me when I try to open any image with a profile different than my color settings default.
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