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Author Topic: Which 24mm tilt-shift for my Canon 5D II  (Read 4676 times)
spotmeter
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« on: October 07, 2008, 08:32:02 PM »
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I want to get the best 24mm tilt-shift for my new Canon 5D2.

Are there any comparative, pixel-peeping tests of the two lenses posted anywhere?
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Josh-H
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« Reply #1 on: October 07, 2008, 09:19:13 PM »
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Quote from: spotmeter
I want to get the best 24mm tilt-shift for my new Canon 5D2.

Are there any comparative, pixel-peeping tests of the two lenses posted anywhere?

Not that I am aware of.

I do have the 24mm TSE Canon and use it on my 1DSMKIII - same resolution as the 5DMK2.

At F8.0 its very sharp in the centre, but it is noticeably soft in the corners.

At anything other than F8 it only heads south in the corners. And of course depends on the degree of tilt and shift.

It also suffers from some fairly nasty Chromatic Aberation, which likewise only gets worse the further you get away from F8 and the more shift and tilt you dial in.

I don't want to make it sound like a bad lens, because it isn't and I regularly use mine - it just isnt the sharpest tool in the shed. But, it brings tilt and shift to the party and has let me capture images with a DOF that would have otherwise been impossible with a regular lens.

Hope this helps.
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Kirk Gittings
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« Reply #2 on: October 07, 2008, 10:06:47 PM »
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I have done some limited testing, The Nikon is slightly better than the Canon. Every little bit counts. My advice is that if one is already invested in Canon it is not worth the money to switch, but if you are just now investing in a system and the 24T/S will be your money lens, buy Nikon. FWIW I make my living with the Canon T/Ss and they are perfectly acceptable for even my high end national clients.
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jsch
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« Reply #3 on: October 08, 2008, 02:20:21 PM »
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Hi spotmeter (what a name),

if you go with the Canon TS-E 24, I would highly recommend to invest $ 25 in PT-Lens (http://www.epaperpress.com/ptlens/index.html). It is the only software correction tool for shifted images I know of. I use it always with images from the TS-E 24, TS-E 45 and the Olympus PC 35. It really improves the images (distorsion, ca and vignetting). The only thing you have to do by hand is to remove magenta lines at very contrasty edges. With this combination I photographed over 300 high-rise buildings and other architecture. Nobody complained so far in terms of image quality.

I would invest in the enlarging (2x) angle viewfinder too. Even with a building 20-50 meters away focusing is critical. Setting the lens to infinity doesn't give optimal sharpness. As far as I know infinity on the lens barrel is "beond" infinity because of the tilt capability. Perhaps live view solves the focusing issues - I worked for the last few years with the EOS 1Ds Mark 2 without live view. BUT accurate focusing is even with the 24 mm lens necessary.

If I shift more than 5 mm I use f11 instead of f8. The reason: f8 gives the best "center" sharpnes. But at f11 the corners still improve. The center gets a bit weaker, but over all the image looks more consistent. But still center sharpness is better than corner sharpness but it differs less.

Last hint: Check and double-check that the tilt is set to zero! That gives you also unsharp and distorted images.

In my opinion the lens is often rated so bad, because it isn't used properly. I hate the lens because it forces me to do so much post production, I love this lens because it gave me already so many good images. I look very jealous to the Hasselblad TS 1.5 thing because it records tilt and shift into exif and does an automatic correction. But what is the price for that, uhh.

Hope that helps
Best
Johannes
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Kagetsu
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« Reply #4 on: October 08, 2008, 05:27:41 PM »
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I can't say I've had a lot of experience, as I've only had my 24mm T/S for a week so far. Prior to purchasing I suffered the same thoughts... however, I decided with the Canon for reasons of simplification.
I can't say I've noticed the chromatic fringing on the edges with mine though... and personally... I've found it's performance to be suprisingly good... When I had originally ordered it, I thought "what have I done? Maybe I should cancel it, and buy the Nikon or that other brand?" Especially when you read the reviews on places such as FM. You'll see it's not received a lot of good reviews, and it's overall rating is pretty low.

That said, the on I have is a very good lens, and the only thing I can fault with it, is the lack of accurate exposure when shifted or tilted, especially towards the extremes. The saving grace of this though, is the fact that T/S lenses aren't really the fastest lenses to use.
For me though, it's become my 24mm prime to. Unshifted, and untilted, it's the sharpest lens I've ever used.
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Kirk Gittings
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« Reply #5 on: October 08, 2008, 08:16:41 PM »
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Hasn't there been some discussion here about adapter problems with using the new Nikon lenses on Canon FF bodies? Is it not true that the usual Nikon/lens to Canon/body lens adapters will not work because of the incompatible electrical contacts and the aperture only works electronically? Someone said, if I remember correctly, that the only way to get the aperture to work was to set the aperture of the lens first on a Nikon body and then switch the lens to the Canon. If this is true and one wants the Nikon lens one might as well buy a Nikon FF body, because this method would be ridiculous.
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Kirk

Kirk Gittings
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Kagetsu
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« Reply #6 on: October 08, 2008, 08:42:14 PM »
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I think that's only G lenses, where a lot of people are still waiting for their custom adapters from the 16-9 fellow... My understanding is he's finally started clearing orders. It's electronically controlled, but is still actuated by a leaver in the lens itself (at least the 14-24 is that way). which is how it's overcome with the new twist adapter.
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dseelig
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« Reply #7 on: October 08, 2008, 09:43:19 PM »
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Well I do not knwo which is better but I picked up a used canon model and I have not used it much and need a coolscan 5000 alot more so if you want to buyone with some barrell wear for 800 I am selling the glass is perfect though. David
Quote from: Kagetsu
I think that's only G lenses, where a lot of people are still waiting for their custom adapters from the 16-9 fellow... My understanding is he's finally started clearing orders. It's electronically controlled, but is still actuated by a leaver in the lens itself (at least the 14-24 is that way). which is how it's overcome with the new twist adapter.
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Kirk Gittings
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« Reply #8 on: October 08, 2008, 10:32:37 PM »
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Adapting the Nikon 24 T/S to a Canon body....

from an earlier LL thread:
"Apparently it needs an electrical signal from the camera (it's an E lens, not a G lens) and without this the aperture ring will not work, so this will be lost when moving it from a Nikon body. Check Fred Miranda, there has been discussion between Mark Welsh and Bo-Ming. No-one has a solution yet, and there is no discussion about trying to find one."

and from the FM site:
"Aperture control is not technically possible with an adaptor as the lens is not mechanically coupled.
There is a workaround, but it apparently requires having a Nikon body handy to set the aperture before moving it over."

I have been following this since it was announced and until this thread everyone said it was really not possible except with a Nikon body. If this is really not true I would like to know about it probably not for my own use as I stated above, but to advise my students knowledgeably.
« Last Edit: October 08, 2008, 10:42:05 PM by Kirk Gittings » Logged

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Kirk

Kirk Gittings
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kaelaria
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« Reply #9 on: October 08, 2008, 11:21:18 PM »
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I very recently read a review in one of the mags of the Canon vs. Nikkor - unfortunately I have already tossed the old mags, and I can't seem to find the article online...the bottom line was the Nikkor had a slightly better image but the controls were not as good, and the Canon offered much more convenient use especially with aperture.  I'll keep searching...
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rethmeier
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« Reply #10 on: October 10, 2008, 09:38:11 PM »
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http://reviews.photographyreview.com/blog/...st-impressions/
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Willem Rethmeier
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