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Author Topic: B&W out of Hasselblad raw files  (Read 1453 times)
VanKou
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« on: October 12, 2008, 10:18:21 PM »
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Hi:

Is it only me or is it generally difficult to get a good B&W image out of hasselblad's raw files?  I consistently can get great tonality out of my Canon files but everything coming out of hasselblad does not look nearly as good.    The way I do it is to use a gradient adjustment layer.  That usually gives me great results with Canon.   Anyone doing the conversion in Flexcolor?   What have you found gives the best results?  

BTW, the back I am using is the V96C

Thanks in advance
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SeanBK
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« Reply #1 on: October 12, 2008, 10:25:31 PM »
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Quote from: VanKou
Hi:

Is it only me or is it generally difficult to get a good B&W image out of hasselblad's raw files?  I consistently can get great tonality out of my Canon files but everything coming out of hasselblad does not look nearly as good.    The way I do it is to use a gradient adjustment layer.  That usually gives me great results with Canon.   Anyone doing the conversion in Flexcolor?   What have you found gives the best results?  

BTW, the back I am using is the V96C

Thanks in advance

Check out Nik software plug in "Silver EfexPro", I love it.
    http://www.niksoftware.com/silverefexpro/usa/entry.php

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jmvdigital
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« Reply #2 on: October 14, 2008, 08:00:49 AM »
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Maybe you aren't used to how far the MFDB files can be pushed with all of that data? The Canon files head straight to their blown limits (highlight and shadow) much faster than your 12-stop, 16-bit files. I would suggest you keep at it, or try different tools. There should be nothing fundamentally different about the Hasselblad data. Perhaps it's the limits of your RAW converter (if you're doing the edits within there), if you are working in Photoshop with a converted Raw file, then the playing field is the same as Canon. Perhaps try converting your image from 16-bits to 8-bits in photoshop and see if that gets you where you want to be?

If none of that playing around gets you satisfactory results, perhaps it's the particular subject you were shooting. Otherwise post some image examples and we can discuss more. I don't think anyone really knows what is "great tonality" to you.

EDIT: I see you are using gradient adjustment layers... What about using the gradient adjustment layer, with additional Curves adjustment to fine tune? Or perhaps try the Black and White adjustment layer (new in CS3), it has much the same fine tuning capabilities for BW conversion that Lightroom does.
« Last Edit: October 14, 2008, 08:04:04 AM by jmvdigital » Logged

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Justin VanAlstyne
jmvdigital, inc.
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