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Author Topic: Tips for landscapte photography  (Read 2999 times)
boku
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« on: June 04, 2005, 02:57:11 PM »
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You are asking a lot of diverse questions with only a few days to master any of the answers. Too bad you didn't "work" this website for a few months already. Much more would be obvious to you. I'll get the ball rolling...

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1. what should be the best exposure for the landscape & skyscape

Use whatever your meter tells you and bracket/compensate judiciously. This is where experience pays off.

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2. how to set "infinite focus" & what to focus in landscape

Given your aperture, set the focus for the corresponding hyperfocal distance. If the depth of field doesn't cover the foreground, it is better to let the distant hills go soft than the nearby rocks and plants.

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3. what kind of role should i take

Assuming you mean film, most landscape folks use Velvia.

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4. what is the best time to shoot landscape

The first 2 hours and last 2 hours of light - early and late.

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5. my main lense do not have hyperfocal meter, so how should i guess about focus to keep foreground, midgroud & background sharp & focus

You can find charts on the web to download and printout. Google on "hyperfocal distance chart".

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6. i want to experiment to make panoramas, so how should i set the exposure for panas, i will be taking it first time

Meter all scenes beforehand and the pick the one with the least exposure and take all scenes with that constant setting. Use only manual exposure settings and no polarizer.

Hope that gets you started off on the right foot. Happy sailing!
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Bob Kulon

Oh, one more thing...
Play it Straight and Play it True, my Brother.
Bill in WV
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« Reply #1 on: June 04, 2005, 03:34:14 PM »
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How could I be so dense?  
I overlooked the most obvious tutorials around. Check out the tutorials right here on the Luminous Landscape! Many are way beyond where you appear to be right now, but there are ones such as Understanding Exposure, that you should find very helpful.

Check them out!

Bill
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Bill Evans

Currently shooting with Canon digital equipment
kiran
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« Reply #2 on: June 04, 2005, 09:47:59 AM »
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Dear all,

I am planning to go for trek (09-14th June) in which i will be capturing landscapes., please guide me for the below issues

1. what should be the best exposure for the landscape & skyscape
2. how to set "infinite focus" & what to focus in landscape
3. what kind of role should i take
4. what is the best time to shoot landscape

5. my main lense do not have hyperfocal meter, so how should i guess about focus to keep foreground, midgroud & background sharp & focus

6. i want to experiment to make panoramas, so how should i set the exposure for panas, i will be taking it first time

I have Nikon F65, Sigma 28-135mm AF + Macro lense, CLP filter, Minolta (manunal camera), 28mm, 50-200mm, 2X & Manfrotto tripod

Appreciate adivces from people who are in landscape & making panos
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Bill in WV
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« Reply #3 on: June 04, 2005, 03:27:16 PM »
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Kiran,
You ask a lot and give us very little to go on. Boku has been far more gracious than I tend to be when approached with such questions as you ask. I have no idea of your age, location, or background and therefore I shall try to be gentle.

I will begin by suggesting that you read your camera's manual if you still have it. Next, if available I should reccommend a trip to either your local library or bookstore. You have some reading to do. I will make a few suggestions and hope they help.

I very recently talked my wife into an elementary book on photography called, "How to photograph your life." Written by Nick Kelsh isbn 1-58479-279-5 Publisher is Stewart, Tabori and Chang of New York. It is a wonderful book aimed at beginners with some very good information.

The Internet is not to be overlooked and just yesterday I found some pretty cool stuff, here are a couple links:
http://www.popphoto.com/article.asp?sectio...article_id=1175
and
http://www.popphoto.com/default.asp?section_id=4

It's not difficult to get started, but you should try to understand just a little of Composition, Exposure, and what your equipment is capable of doing for you. Does your camera have an autoexposure mode? Does your camera have autofocus, that works with your lenses? Use what you have to record your trip, don't get bogged down in the technobabble of it all.

Hope you find some of this helpful, but to summarize all the fundamentals of photography, even the basics, in a single email is asking a lot. It is just part of the price you have to pay, and it is cheap! It only takes a little time on YOUR part.

Bill in WV
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Bill Evans

Currently shooting with Canon digital equipment
kiran
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« Reply #4 on: June 06, 2005, 03:43:04 AM »
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hi bill & boku,
thanks for all your supportive quaries, i will keep in mind & i am studying in net also, i have clicked landscape before but i am not satisfies with the results. hope to capture good one now.

i have taken this sunset at my last trip  http://rawat.fotopic.net/p10110427.html

& this paro http://rawat.fotopic.net/p10111671.html

bye.......take care........kiran
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