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Author Topic: Recent Professional Works  (Read 1132073 times)
Abdulrahman Aljabri
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« Reply #4160 on: January 09, 2013, 10:28:47 AM »
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Single exposure; 5dMii, 24mmTS, some strobe & some continuous light.


very good picture. I would have pulled the planet a little more to the right. How many light you used? did you use 24ts mk1 or mk2?
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MY SITE: ALJABRI MEDIA PRODUCTION

Abdulrahman - and yes its a long name but has a meaning "servant of the merciful". you can also call me abdul
Scott Hargis
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« Reply #4161 on: January 09, 2013, 10:45:11 AM »
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Abdul, thanks. There's a lot about the styling that I don't like. My own impulse is to move the plant to the <b>left</b> a little. And the Eames chair, as well. Unfortunately I was on my own for this; my client (design/build) had already gone home for the night.

I'm using the 24TS mII. Best lens I've ever used. This was made last fall; I remember 6 lights for sure, could have been one more.
« Last Edit: January 09, 2013, 11:09:55 AM by Scott Hargis » Logged

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Abdulrahman Aljabri
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« Reply #4162 on: January 09, 2013, 11:34:04 AM »
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Abdul, thanks. There's a lot about the styling that I don't like. My own impulse is to move the plant to the <b>left</b> a little. And the Eames chair, as well. Unfortunately I was on my own for this; my client (design/build) had already gone home for the night.

I'm using the 24TS mII. Best lens I've ever used. This was made last fall; I remember 6 lights for sure, could have been one more.

it does look like you had a lot of lights, how did you manage to set them all up just in time for the right ambient light?
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MY SITE: ALJABRI MEDIA PRODUCTION

Abdulrahman - and yes its a long name but has a meaning "servant of the merciful". you can also call me abdul
Scott Hargis
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« Reply #4163 on: January 09, 2013, 04:22:03 PM »
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Abdul, we started early. We spent maybe 60 minutes setting up, 30 minutes tweaking things, and 20 minutes or so waiting for the perfect light. I also have a quasi-daylight version of this that I was able to salvage from an early exposure, with a lot of "rescue" post processing.
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Abdulrahman Aljabri
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« Reply #4164 on: January 10, 2013, 12:00:20 AM »
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Abdul, we started early. We spent maybe 60 minutes setting up, 30 minutes tweaking things, and 20 minutes or so waiting for the perfect light. I also have a quasi-daylight version of this that I was able to salvage from an early exposure, with a lot of "rescue" post processing.

You basically setup all your lights before sunset? It's very difficult to setup lights for a night scene when working in daylight, because you can't exactly see what the lights are doing. Plus when the perfect sunset moment comes I find my self scrambling to adjust lights before missing out the sky view.  One thing I thought about to counter this problem is to 1. setup the camera and prepare the space in advance 2. capture the perfect window view  3. adjust the lights without worrying about the time 4. add the window view in post.
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MY SITE: ALJABRI MEDIA PRODUCTION

Abdulrahman - and yes its a long name but has a meaning "servant of the merciful". you can also call me abdul
Scott Hargis
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« Reply #4165 on: January 10, 2013, 12:10:28 PM »
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You basically setup all your lights before sunset? It's very difficult to setup lights for a night scene when working in daylight, because you can't exactly see what the lights are doing. Plus when the perfect sunset moment comes I find my self scrambling to adjust lights before missing out the sky view.  One thing I thought about to counter this problem is to 1. setup the camera and prepare the space in advance 2. capture the perfect window view  3. adjust the lights without worrying about the time 4. add the window view in post.

80% of the lighting is in place before the sun hits the horizon. I try to have a pretty detailed vision in my mind for how the shot should look, so it's not too hard to figure out light placements. Wattage is another matter; that's what's being tweaked as the ambient light starts dropping.
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Rob C
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« Reply #4166 on: January 11, 2013, 10:34:16 AM »
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Kodachrome 64 Pro converted to b/white.

Client: Hewden/Stuart Group plc.

Rob C
« Last Edit: January 23, 2013, 01:40:25 PM by Rob C » Logged

JoeKitchen
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« Reply #4167 on: January 12, 2013, 04:53:43 PM »
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Shot this a couple of days ago.  ISO 100, 30s at f/11 with a linear polarizer.  Use a good deal f additional lights, but turned them off at different times throughout the exposure.  I did a general raw processing for the entire image, then did a raw processing customized for the stage and dropped it in. 
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Joe Kitchen
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"Photography is one percent inspiration and ninety-nine percent moving furniture."  Arnold Newman
“Don't bother just to be better than your contemporaries or predecessors. Try to be better than yourself.”  William Faulkner
haefnerphoto
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« Reply #4168 on: January 12, 2013, 08:52:18 PM »
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Kodachrome 64 Pro converted to b/white.

Client: Hewden/Stuart Group plc.

Rob C

Love it!!
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SecondFocus
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« Reply #4169 on: January 12, 2013, 09:43:40 PM »
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This really is superb!

Kodachrome 64 Pro converted to b/white.

Client: Hewden/Stuart Group plc.

Rob C
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Ian L. Sitren
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Kirk Gittings
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« Reply #4170 on: January 12, 2013, 09:59:06 PM »
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Amazing the feedback a couple of perky nipples will get Smiley
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Kirk

Kirk Gittings
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LIGHT+SPACE+STRUCTURE (blog)
SecondFocus
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« Reply #4171 on: January 12, 2013, 10:10:09 PM »
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Actually I am just in awe of the tonality of the black and white conversion from Kodachrome. It is just beautiful!

And it is exactly my kind of subject matter Smiley

Amazing the feedback a couple of perky nipples will get Smiley

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Ian L. Sitren
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Eric Myrvaagnes
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« Reply #4172 on: January 12, 2013, 10:35:17 PM »
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Amazing the feedback a couple of perky nipples will get Smiley

Makes one wonder why architects doon't put a couple on every building.  Grin
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Kirk Gittings
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« Reply #4173 on: January 12, 2013, 10:54:07 PM »
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Makes one wonder why architects doon't put a couple on every building.  Grin


Smiley
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Thanks,
Kirk

Kirk Gittings
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LIGHT+SPACE+STRUCTURE (blog)
Rob C
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« Reply #4174 on: January 13, 2013, 04:27:22 AM »
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Makes one wonder why architects doon't put a couple on every building.  Grin




Look at the Carlton in Cannes and the Negresco in Nice.

;-)

Rob C
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Rob C
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« Reply #4175 on: January 13, 2013, 04:35:30 AM »
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Thanks, haef 'n' Second; praise indeed from you guys!

Yes, I've often thought that in the right light, Kodachrome was preferrable to any b/w film for the look that I currently like in b/w prints. Partly, I think it's down to the exposure methodology used: incident light readings based on retaining important highlights. The problem I face converting from Kodachrome is scanning: I'm not very clever with that, and have a simple CanoScan which I'm sure I don't use to its best advantage, as it is.

Oh well, it was all fun whilst it lasted!

Thanks again,

Rob C
« Last Edit: January 13, 2013, 04:37:57 AM by Rob C » Logged

KLaban
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« Reply #4176 on: January 13, 2013, 07:38:47 AM »
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Rob, it certainly is a lovely conversion.
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Rob C
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« Reply #4177 on: January 13, 2013, 09:07:36 AM »
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Thank you, Keith; it owes a lot to the model, Denise Denny.

Unusual sort of beauty, and amazing actual sex-appeal. We were staying in a small Nassau hotel (Pilot House) near the Paradise Island Bridge, and I remember one evening when she, the other girl (probably more pretty) and my wife and I walked into the bar. I can tell you (though I didn't really notice at the time) that my wife later informed me that every eye in that place was instantly drawn to Denise.

The things women can notice in an instant.

Rob C
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ChristopherBarrett
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« Reply #4178 on: January 13, 2013, 04:16:21 PM »
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You basically setup all your lights before sunset? It's very difficult to setup lights for a night scene when working in daylight, because you can't exactly see what the lights are doing. Plus when the perfect sunset moment comes I find my self scrambling to adjust lights before missing out the sky view.  One thing I thought about to counter this problem is to 1. setup the camera and prepare the space in advance 2. capture the perfect window view  3. adjust the lights without worrying about the time 4. add the window view in post.

Abdul, the best way to handle that is to cover all the windows with black while setting up the shot.  Then you can get the light level perfect.  In a traditional dusk view like this, you should be getting almost no ambient daylight when you finally expose.  We typically uncover the windows 30-40 minutes prior to dusk and spend that time hiding reflections.  When the window reaches the desirable brightness level you should be ready to go.

Cheers,
CB
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pixjohn
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« Reply #4179 on: January 13, 2013, 08:59:51 PM »
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I just use experience shooting dusk. Years of lighting I can guesstimate what light, how much if any scrims  and when its time to shoot, just tweak the lights.
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