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Author Topic: a help to a new on photography  (Read 2681 times)
Andrea Barbieri
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« on: February 21, 2004, 01:10:19 PM »
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i think i'm not clear upper here, i try to correct

1) is the sony good for the kind of work i want do? (as suggested?)  photo of bodypaint, motorcyle, canvass, and for take reference photo from skyes, animal flower  various material etc,
 from now i know i will no have great photo but i suppose with pratice i will learn.

this is one i've do in manual  using flash iso 64
http://www.tempobizzarro.altervista.org/im...ni/contessa.jpg

and one without flash iso64
http://www.tempobizzarro.altervista.org/immagini/erik.jpg

(sorry i dont know how to post photo correctly to be viewed in the forum)

2°) i will be happy to any suggestion for a beginner how to take good shot of person in close ambient (i will do the photo in house with a (doorwindow) as lightsource. or to helmet that are high reflective and the flash is unusable (i think.)
then general suggestion on focus times opening always could help me understand better the things writed on the manual.

thanks to any help
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Dale_Cotton
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« Reply #1 on: February 21, 2004, 02:42:59 PM »
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A) You are very welcome here, but photography can be very complex. If you cannot understand what we write, you may want to use Google to search for a photography discussion forum in your own language. Another resource is to look for a camera club in your area.

 F828 is a very good camera for what you are doing. Only little problem it can have is taking pictures in low light without flash.

C) To get accurate colour, ask your camera dealer for a grey card. Each time you use a different light souce, put the grey card in one picture. When you open that picture in Photoshop, open Curves or Levels then use the grey eye dropper to click on the grey card. This will neutralize the colours. Now use same correction on other pictures. (The only problem with grey cards is if there are more than one light source of different colour of light.)

D) I think the problem you have with helmuts is what we call specular glare. Shiny things act like a mirror to reflect back too much light from sun or flash:
1) Point the camera at a different place in the same light that has no specular glare to get exposure.
2) Press and hold shutter release button half way down.
3) Point camera back at subject with specular glare.
4) Press the shutter release all the way down.

E) "book of things i've done". This is called a portfolio. We all know the problem of making a portfolio.
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Harold
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« Reply #2 on: February 22, 2004, 04:38:17 PM »
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I myself am a "new" photographer in the technical sense. Sure, we can all use the easy cameras.  The biggest problems that I have had have been in matching colour profiles - monitor, printer, scanner, paper, ink ---.  It has taken me a number of months and quite a bit of paper and ink to begin to match all of my colour profiles.  For accurate colour matching, make sure that your monitor is properly profiled.  I re-profile my monitor every day.  Once you have this complete, you will have to experiment with your printer output to make sure there is an accurate colour match. You will find that paper is quite important. Well, they are all important. Camera use and Photoshop are the easy parts. I presently have a Canon S820 which is quite good. I will be upgrading to a Canon 9100 after I take a "photo" printing course.
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Desertglow
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« Reply #3 on: February 24, 2004, 07:30:48 AM »
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Ciao Andrea,
non conosco specifiche risposte alle tue domande, però ti volevo segnalare che se cerchi un forum italiano dove fare 4 chiacchere pacate e non "urlate" tra appassionati di fotografia analogica o digitale , potresti venire sul nostro:

http://www.fotoavventure.it e clicca su "Entra nel forum"
Ciao
Roberto
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Andrea Barbieri
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« Reply #4 on: February 21, 2004, 11:55:05 AM »
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For first sorry if my english is horrible.
i've some question that i'm sure someone could  help me find answers.
i'm absolutely new to photograpy but some circumstances and some needs push me not to be only a photo "watcher" but  start make photos. some shot i take in manual are not bad (for my skill) if i could i will post a couple.

for 1° at all i must explain for what i want use the camera, i'm an airbrusher, (not a pro for now but i'm studying with one that would make me pro), and as all other airbusher around the world i need a lot of photographic references, of various types, from skyes, to faces closeup of object fruits and so on. and i must have a book of things i've done and this could be  from a cover of  gsm to a trompe d'oeil, or a body paint or shirts or canvass. another important thing is that for making a book i must take good photo, that respect what i've done.
the work i've to do in now is a group of body paint,
the problem i see in body paint photo's i see  is that the colours was hardly respected, or the "effects" is not what you can see from real.

any suggestion on take photo on person could be great to me.
and how take photos of helmets, that reflect a lot lights.

the camera  i have is an f828 (the delaer suggest me this) so any help on settings  could be usefull too!!

thanks .
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Digi-T
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« Reply #5 on: February 21, 2004, 01:59:33 PM »
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Welcome Andrea. The new F828 is very capable of being used for your purposes. For photographing any kind of artwork, and that includes painted bodies, it is very important that you use a tripod to eliminate any camera shake. Another benefit of using a tripod is that you will be able to use slower shutter speeds, the lowest ISO, and a smaller aperture (higher number like F5.6 - F8) for maximum depth of field. They other thing is the lighting. Forget the on-camera flash for photographing artwork. My recommendation for now would be to get a couple of 500 - 1000 watt halogen lamps to position on either side of the art at 45 degreee angles to the surface of the art for bright even lighting. With this method you can see what you are going to get and reposition the lights if necessary. This works well for flat artwork but for forms and bodies you will want to experiment by possibly having a brighter light on one side and a dimmer light on the other to accentuate the form while still providing enough light to see the art. Halogens will get very hot so you need to be careful and work accordingly. Remember to set your white balance setting correctly on your camera. I probably would not use the auto mode. By uing a gray card learn to set the white balance correctly. This is crucial for art and people. I am not an expert here but I also am an artist and have been photographing my own art for many years and it can be tricky. I usually always have to make further levels adjustments in my photo editor because it is almost impossible to capture the full range of lighting straight from the camera. Remamber, keeping the camera absolutely still with your subject evenly lit is very important. I hope this helps. Maybe someone else will chime in with some more tips.

T
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Andrea Barbieri
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« Reply #6 on: February 21, 2004, 06:58:47 PM »
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thanks for the suggestion Dave and Digi-T,
i could  translate better than i write, i stopped here due to the site and the photo i see in, some are for me absolutely wonderful. and i read some post before writing to see what kind of persons there's, and here is quite better than in other forums where i see "flying knifes", and if someone (like me) ask for some  "simple" suggestion is ignored at all.

i have to know if i understand well a thing  about iso and "time" 64 iso is conventionaly "slow" need more light, 100/200 is a kind of all duty, need minor lights  400/800 fast don't need a lot of light. right? (i use the range of the 828 cause is this camera i must manage) so at 800 iso the 828 is noisy (for me is not a bad thing, i tryed with an apple and a really low and warm light, and the effect i've gained is something that remember me some old photo that fascinating me) but if i need to make a bit "sharper" photo in a low light situation what the best thing i  could do?
1) use 64/100 upping time? 1 sec  and open a lot  so i could get more light??
2) if i want reduce a bit the noise don't using a noise reductor as noiseninja but using the camera in a low light situation  using 400/800 i must do the inverse? shorttimes and more closed in italian is "diaframma" in english the translator say diaphragm  (bu i'm unsure if is correct...)
thanks.
i forgot a thing i will put here links of my pfoto plz judge it and suggest me better choise and suggestion, i will sign settings i use so i could have suggestions and correction.
thanks to all.
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Scott_H
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« Reply #7 on: February 22, 2004, 05:48:22 PM »
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Diaphragm sounds like aperture to me.  A large aperture (small number, backward and confusing at first) will give limited depth of field, a small part of the image will be in focus.  Sometimes this is good, sometimes not.  A small aperture (large number) will give more depth of field.

If you are shooting things that are not moving, and you are set up on a tripod, then shutter speed is not critical.  You can use aperture priority to control depth of field and let the camera pick shutter speed.

For shooting people this may not work well.  The 828 has a hot shoe for a flash.  With an external flash you can put a diffuser on it, or point it to the ceiling and bounce it so the light is less harsh.

Soft boxes are another option. Basically a light with a big diffuser.  I think these are fairly inexpensive.
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azdustdevil
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« Reply #8 on: February 24, 2004, 08:13:07 AM »
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The Sony is good for your purchases.  ISO 64 is very slow.  Use a tripod or go to a higher ISO.  Good Luck!
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