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Author Topic: ESP 7900 Feature  (Read 40338 times)
Wayne Fox
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« Reply #20 on: January 14, 2009, 04:00:26 PM »
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An update.  As far as weather, I live in Utah, which indoors during the winter is about as dry as it can get.  My 11880 has been virtually clog free, despite the climate.

After the tech left on Monday, each day I have started the printer and printed a nozzle check - no clogs either day.  I also have the printer set to do the Auto Nozzle Detect each time I send a print, as well as printing a nozzle check pattern on each print.

Since the repair on Monday, I have had no clogs, and the unit has not triggered a cleaning cycle from the auto nozzle detect function.

It appears that the defective board and possible defective wiper assembly has resolved my problems.  If anything changes I'll update everyone.  In the meantime, if I could now resolve my i1 Pro and i1i0 table issues so I could get some really good profiles I'd be really happy.
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« Reply #21 on: January 15, 2009, 04:18:31 PM »
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Quote from: Wayne Fox
An update.  As far as weather, I live in Utah, which indoors during the winter is about as dry as it can get.  My 11880 has been virtually clog free, despite the climate.

After the tech left on Monday, each day I have started the printer and printed a nozzle check - no clogs either day.  I also have the printer set to do the Auto Nozzle Detect each time I send a print, as well as printing a nozzle check pattern on each print.

Since the repair on Monday, I have had no clogs, and the unit has not triggered a cleaning cycle from the auto nozzle detect function.

It appears that the defective board and possible defective wiper assembly has resolved my problems.  If anything changes I'll update everyone.  In the meantime, if I could now resolve my i1 Pro and i1i0 table issues so I could get some really good profiles I'd be really happy.

Thanks so much for the updates Wayne.
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« Reply #22 on: January 18, 2009, 10:44:54 AM »
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I would like to start by thanking Ionaca for starting this post and Wayne for his detailed contributions, because untill i sent a link of this post to the UK TeckSupport i was told there were no reports of this sort of problem. This did not help my blood pressure having just dumped 200 worth of ink down the pan. The waste tank went from 44% left to 24%. So i thought i should report my problems.
I live in the UK at Cowes on the Isle of Wight and print for pro Yatching photographers and other artists, wonderful prints from this printer.
I bought my 9900 late Nov.2008.When i installed the inks it reported Auto Head Cleaning failed,but from my other Epsons i had learnt never to ask for another head clean, wastes ink,just do a nozzle check. I did leave the Auto Nozzle Check to On-periodically, and seemed OK, but i did leave the printer switched on all the time after having switched it off once and seeing it do a large clean.
Last Thursday after doing some printing, i switched the printer off and on and it went into a cleaning cycle and reported Auto Cleaning Failed. Selected No but it had already dumped ink equal to 20% volume of waste tank. There have been no problems with print quality.
I have now been told that the problem has been moved to Level 2 by Teck Support, whatever that means, and i wait to hear from them.

Update 18.1.09; I did a print yesterday evening 2315, all OK, clean nozzle check,good print.This morning i did a nozzle check for interest and found 9 of the colours had nozzels blocked.What might be significant was that all but 1 of the blocks were the bottom 2 lines? Not good news.
This is just why i bought this printer to avoid blocks and ink waste!



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Wayne Fox
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« Reply #23 on: January 27, 2009, 10:14:35 PM »
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It's been about 2 weeks since the tech was here to repair my 7900. I have had Auto Nozzle Detect set to check  with each print, as well as print a nozzle check pattern with each print, to try and verify the repair actually fixed the problem.

The printer is turned off each night, and the following morning I start the printer and print a nozzle pattern.  About every 3 or 4 days, I find there is an issue with the pattern.  (My 11880 has this happen every 3 or 4 months).  The auto nozzle detect feature picks up the error and initiates a cleaning cycle.  This means the printer is requiring a cleaning cycle at least 2 or 3 times a week ... far more often than I would expect.

Today I forgot to print the nozzle check pattern, and just went to print out my first print.  The AID unit (Auto Ink Detection) triggered a cleaning cycle, so I assumed there was a clog/nozzle problem.  It apparently failed again, so it triggered a second cleaning cycle.  At that point the printer stopped and said the nozzle cleaning failed, would I like to try again.  I said no, and immediately printed a nozzle pattern ... which was perfect (under a loupe).

So while my problems are better, the printer is not performing as it should ... far too many cleanings, and still insisting on cleaning when it appears to be fine.

A quick call to Epson, and the service tech will be in tomorrow.  They are now thinking the head may not be capping tightly enough or that the pump unit may not be supplying adequate pressure to the inks (possible it actually isn't a clog, just the ink isn't getting through well enough).




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« Reply #24 on: January 29, 2009, 11:57:17 AM »
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I have an epson 9900 and have had the behavior describe early in the thread occur several times.   After initiating a selective cleaning the printer would report that the cleaning had failed but, when I do a manual check it shows no issues.  I also did a manual test, it showed a few of the colors over 50% missing.   I did a selective clean on one of the colors. the printer reported a failure, but when I did a manual check all colors were now printing fine including the ones I had not done a selective cleaning on.   A lot of my ink has been consumed in the process and I am dissappointed that this function is not working as it should.   I am following this thread with interest as I still need to call Epson, to see what they say.

I wish this printer would do what My HP Z3100 does which is turn on every so often, spit out a little ink to keep its head clean and then go to sleep again.   I almost never have head clog issues that machine and was hoping Epson would have taken the cue regarding allowing the printer to have a firmware routine which keeps itself clear without using a lot of ink.

John
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Wayne Fox
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« Reply #25 on: January 29, 2009, 04:55:53 PM »
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Quote from: hilljf
on, to see what they say.

I wish this printer would do what My HP Z3100 does which is turn on every so often, spit out a little ink to keep its head clean and then go to sleep again.   I almost never have head clog issues that machine and was hoping Epson would have taken the cue regarding allowing the printer to have a firmware routine which keeps itself clear without using a lot of ink.

John

I wish this machine did what my 11880 does, and run virtually clog free.  The auto nozzle detect on that machine has not been an issue, nor have clogs.

Currently I am at 63% on my second maintenance cartridge, as compared to my 11880 (now about 15 months old) at 40% remaining of it's first one.  The other 2 on the 11880 are at 100% still.  So a lot of ink has gone into cleaning.  My 7900 has consumed @960ml of ink since it was installed (not counting the ink required for the initial priming), and I've only printed 95 pages. As mentioned (in this thread or another one), the LK alone has required over 100ml of ink.  I don't know how big a page is, but by rough  calculations based on the prints I've done, and examining the job file which shows ink consumption by job, it appears it takes around 1 to 1.2 ml/square foot.   which means perhaps as much as 900 ml of that ink is in the maintenance cartridge and not on a piece of paper.

From my perspective though Epson service has been very responsive, including sending me (well, most of it's back ordered) a full set of 150ml cartridges, which means so far I'm not out any ink personally.

Yesterday the tech arrived and replaced the pump/capping assembly. Remaining ink levels were all at the same% after the repair, so that took very little, if any, ink.

  Unfortunately when I turned the machine on this morning a nozzle check (on luster paper examined with a loop) appeared pristine ... certainly good enough to print with, yet when I sent the first job to the printer the Auto Nozzle Detect triggered a cleaning cycle.  Another call to the tech and to Epson.

I"m not sure what they are going to try this time, but it did sound like the tech on the phone was going to escalate this a little.  I mentioned that at least some others are having problems, and that perhaps it is even more widespread than they realize, because many are just disabling the feature so they don't know if it works or not.

If you are having issues it would help everyone to make the call.  As I mentioned Epson USA has been terrific so far.  If it is a widespread problem (not saying it is, but seems to be quite a few are having it), they will only know that if it gets reported.

Unlike many companies where tech support always tries to blame user error first, I have had nothing like that ... just agreement that something isn't right and needs to be fixed ASAP.
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Wayne Fox
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« Reply #26 on: February 09, 2009, 04:40:57 PM »
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guess it's time to update this.  Not sure how much interest there is but for the sake of keeping this in the same thread  I'll post the current status for those that may be having similar problems.

Last Wednesday my 7900 was serviced for the 3rd time.  Each previous visit appeared to resolve the problem for a few days, only to see it return.  The problem was two fold.  First, the Auto Nozzle Detect system would trigger cleaning cycles, despite a perfect nozzle check printed immediately before (this takes a lot of ink because it cleans every color, not just the ones affected).  Second, about every 2 or 3 days when powering the machine up, 2 to 4 colors would show a significant number (30 to 50%) of clogged nozzles .. something that I've never seen with my 11880 even after being off for a month or so.  Overall ink consumption has been off the chart (over 1200ml of ink consumed with only 105 pages printed).

This time he spend about 6 hours or more working on the machine.  Previous visits saw the replacement of the AID board, the head cap assembly, and the wiping assembly.  This visit he tried swapping out the main board (which didn't work so he put the previous main board back in).  He had a special "jig" sent which is used to adjust the spacing on the AID (auto ink detect) board, and did confirm to me that it needed adjusted.  He also replaced the head.  The printer worked great on Friday afternoon, and today it showed no clogs when powered up and so far the Auto Nozzle Check has not detected any clogs, so no wasted ink in cleaning cycles.

I have my fingers crossed.
« Last Edit: February 09, 2009, 07:23:07 PM by Wayne Fox » Logged

Ryan Grayley
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« Reply #27 on: February 09, 2009, 05:31:49 PM »
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Quote from: Wayne Fox
He had a special "jig" sent which is used to adjust the spacing on the AID (auto ink detect) board, and did confirm to me that it needed adjusted.

Thanks for your update Wayne. Co-incidentally I have at last something new to feed back to this thread.

Having reported my problem on the 28th November and again on the 3rd of December, I was eventually contacted by Epson UK a few days ago (February). As a result I had an engineer visit today and amongst other tests he also checked the spacing with the special 'jig'. Anyway everything was within specification. The firmware was reverted to a earlier level for the time being and I have been instructed to contact the engineer directly if the AID problems recur. The next step may involve parts being replaced.

Cheers,

Ryan
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Ryan Grayley BA IEng MIET ARPS
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« Reply #28 on: February 10, 2009, 09:10:58 PM »
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Hello all, thanks for all your post thus far.  Very helpful info and good to know we are not alone experiencing some growing pains of this new device.
First off, I am in Canada and have had the 9900 since Dec 31.  I finally set it up and started printing about the first week into Jan (after the holidays).  Set-up was pain free and printing was incredible at first.  A few things I noticed, lots of cleaning cycles, at least one a day, sometimes a few times while the printer was resting between prints.  I have not printed heavily with this thing so I am quite disappointed with how often it was cleaning, so I disabled the auto cleaning in the control panel and still noticed it was cleaning or showing some nozzle clogs.  This is far too much considering this thing is supposed to be less prone to clogs and use less inks to change btwn Mk and PK. The xx80 series was an improvement and this generation is supposed to be further improved.  This is yet to be the case from what a lot of owners are experiencing.

So after noticing that the light black was down to about 5% and the rest of the carts are showing  btwn 40 and 50% (still with the starter carts) I decided to call Epson preferred service to inquire as to why this was and was this normal and at first did not find the CS rep very helpful and kept saying this is not unusual, lets keep monitoring your problems and build up a history.  I pointed out the fact that I was not alone experiencing this low light black and frequent cleanings and he kept saying you can't apply situations on the forums to yours.  Let's keep monitoring (in other words, do lots of cleaning cycles wasting ink at my expense) and eventually if it does not improve we can send a tech out.  He also said that the light black shares a line to the print head with the MK or Pk and that when you change the black ink, the light black also gets flushed.  So now instead of having just the one ink that flushes we have 2 (light black and either Mk or Pk).  I guess that is an improvement over all the inks being flushed and less wasteful, but I don't get why they could not have designed this better.  Other manufacturers are able to do it.
Anyways, back to the Cs rep who was not helpful initially.  It was not until I asked to speak to another Cs rep or a supervisor that I eventually got them to send a tech out to look at it.  They said that parts would be sent out first, before the tech.
When briefly speaking to the tech who is coming this Friday, he mentionned that unlike the 11880 and even the 9880 which have three and two pressure pumps respectively, the 9900 only has one.  So it could well be that some nozzles are not pressurized enough and causing the nozzle tests to be not all 100% on certain colors giving the printer the impression that there is a clog in those colors.

On another note, I have since spoken to another CS rep and the treatment has been nothing but first rate.  They have decided to send a light black cart after discovering that the tech who will be coming said he needed another light black cart to perform the repairs (5% would not be enough) and he could not have his regular supply chain (in Canada) provide him with a replacement.
Apparently Epson Canada does not seem to be that organized because I can't even get the ink cart from the vendor who sold me the printer cause they don't know when Epson will send them stock.
Or maybe it is just that the light black is very hard to find at the moment?

I will update after the tech has visited.

« Last Edit: February 10, 2009, 09:13:16 PM by Marc M » Logged
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« Reply #29 on: February 10, 2009, 10:08:58 PM »
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Just an update on my continuing problems with my 9900.  I have called Epson 3 times and they are finally responding to my 2 times per week nozzle clogging problem.  They are sending parts and a tech after that.  Seems that the printer head is not sealing after printing.  I'll keep you posted on how things proceed.  I also understand that there is another firmware upgrade coming to deal with an overly sensitive head check sensor.

Regards,
Malcolm
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« Reply #30 on: February 11, 2009, 01:46:32 PM »
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Quote from: mrkahn
Just an update on my continuing problems with my 9900.  I have called Epson 3 times and they are finally responding to my 2 times per week nozzle clogging problem.  They are sending parts and a tech after that.  Seems that the printer head is not sealing after printing.  I'll keep you posted on how things proceed.  I also understand that there is another firmware upgrade coming to deal with an overly sensitive head check sensor.

Regards,
Malcolm

Wow - seems like most of these printers have the same clogging problems.  Is there anyone who has these that work WITHOUT clogging problems?

Clogging is why my 4800 is sitting idle on my desk so this isn't looking good for Epson so far.
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Steve Goldenberg
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Wayne Fox
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« Reply #31 on: February 12, 2009, 04:04:44 PM »
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Quote from: Wayne Fox
First, the Auto Nozzle Detect system would trigger cleaning cycles, despite a perfect nozzle check printed immediately before (this takes a lot of ink because it cleans every color, not just the ones affected).

Quoting myself here because this may be incorrect. I have not found anyone that can officially answer this question, but after my experience today it appears if only 1 channel is affected the printer will clean just that channel.  Still unclear what it does if more than 1 channel is affected ... it may do a full head clean because it is faster than 2 individual channel cleans.

I've been tracking ink consumption since the printer was fixed Friday.  It hasn't had any clogs on startup, and there have been no faulty cleanings started when sending the first print.  After printing a 24x24" print I noticed some "banding" in a color checker image in the dark and medium grey patches.  I was printing a series of these for DPI tests for a new product we are going to make, and when I sent the second print, the printer correctly detected the clog, and cleaned.  Either PK or LK (or both) had one or two nozzles clogged (which I would have never seen on typical prints).  After it cleaned I checked the ink levels and noticed that all of the other channels were being consumed at a much slower rate... 1 to 2% vs these 2 at 5% since the service. I had printed about 20 square feet of paper, so the 1 to 2% rate seems about right for that much media.

This implies the printer did only clean the PK/LK channel and not all of the channels.  Only Epson can answer this question for sure, but I suspect now I was wrong in my original assumption and the printer is smart enough to clean only affected channels - at least when only 1 channel needs cleaned.

My printer has been performing much better except for this one instance where the clog occurred during the printing process itself, and I have had no faulty Auto Ink Detect cycles, just one correct one.

Fingers still crossed.
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« Reply #32 on: February 12, 2009, 09:05:42 PM »
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Quote from: Wayne Fox
The tech showed up today, and the AID board showed OK for the first test, then failed for the second. This can cause intermittent and unnecessary head cleanings due to a fault reading of the Auto Ink Detector.

  He replaced the wiper assembly and the AID board, gave me a new maintenance cartridge and said he would get me a set of starter cartridges to replace the ink I've lost.  He's going to check on another board that may be an issue, and will call me wednesday.  He agreed that I shouldn't see clogged nozzles every time I started the machine ... but said sometimes they aren't from a clog but can be from a faulty pressure system.  No clog, just no ink at the nozzle.  This could possibly explain my previous post where several clogged channels cleared even though I didn't clean them.  He's going to research that more, and promised to replace the pump and head assembly if I continue to see nozzle issues each time I start the machine.

Very helpful and very interested in making the printer right for me.

Wayne,

Thank you so much for keeping us up to date on this issue.  I am struggling with whether to buy an Epson 900 series or the HP 3200.  There are many things that make the Epson appealing.  But I do go for fairly long periods of time without printing so this clog / clog control issue does concern me in a major way.  I'll be looking forward to hearing how things shake out.
Margee
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« Reply #33 on: February 13, 2009, 09:26:51 AM »
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Quote from: Wayne Fox
Quoting myself here because this may be incorrect. I have not found anyone that can officially answer this question, but after my experience today it appears if only 1 channel is affected the printer will clean just that channel.  Still unclear what it does if more than 1 channel is affected ... it may do a full head clean because it is faster than 2 individual channel cleans.

I've been tracking ink consumption since the printer was fixed Friday.  It hasn't had any clogs on startup, and there have been no faulty cleanings started when sending the first print.  After printing a 24x24" print I noticed some "banding" in a color checker image in the dark and medium grey patches.  I was printing a series of these for DPI tests for a new product we are going to make, and when I sent the second print, the printer correctly detected the clog, and cleaned.  Either PK or LK (or both) had one or two nozzles clogged (which I would have never seen on typical prints).  After it cleaned I checked the ink levels and noticed that all of the other channels were being consumed at a much slower rate... 1 to 2% vs these 2 at 5% since the service. I had printed about 20 square feet of paper, so the 1 to 2% rate seems about right for that much media.

This implies the printer did only clean the PK/LK channel and not all of the channels.  Only Epson can answer this question for sure, but I suspect now I was wrong in my original assumption and the printer is smart enough to clean only affected channels - at least when only 1 channel needs cleaned.

My printer has been performing much better except for this one instance where the clog occurred during the printing process itself, and I have had no faulty Auto Ink Detect cycles, just one correct one.

Fingers still crossed.

Thank you for the update Wayne.  Hopefully you Epson has fixed the problems for you for good.  
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« Reply #34 on: February 17, 2009, 08:09:21 PM »
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Well, this thread has certainly been an interesting read. I currently own a Canon 5100 and have been contemplating moving up to a 6100 or an Epson 7900. I've been pretty darn happy with the 5100. It produces very nice color and b&w prints, and the only failure I've had was an ink tank chip that went south. The 5100 is really boring...in a good way. It just works. No clogs, no problems at all in the 7 months I've owned it. I'm sure I'd be very happy with a 6100 but the 7900 seems like it may be at the top of the heap from an image quality standpoint. Reading about these 7900 problems throws up a red flag for me though. It almost sounds like Epson pushed this out the door a bit prematurely. This printer is a lot of dough. It shouldn't be causing this kind of grief for its users. Anyway, thanks to all of you 7900 owners for sharing your experiences here and I hope these issues get ironed out.
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Wayne Fox
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« Reply #35 on: February 18, 2009, 01:08:51 AM »
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Quote from: dwood
Well, this thread has certainly been an interesting read. I currently own a Canon 5100 and have been contemplating moving up to a 6100 or an Epson 7900. I've been pretty darn happy with the 5100. It produces very nice color and b&w prints, and the only failure I've had was an ink tank chip that went south. The 5100 is really boring...in a good way. It just works. No clogs, no problems at all in the 7 months I've owned it. I'm sure I'd be very happy with a 6100 but the 7900 seems like it may be at the top of the heap from an image quality standpoint. Reading about these 7900 problems throws up a red flag for me though. It almost sounds like Epson pushed this out the door a bit prematurely. This printer is a lot of dough. It shouldn't be causing this kind of grief for its users. Anyway, thanks to all of you 7900 owners for sharing your experiences here and I hope these issues get ironed out.

I moved from an ipf6100 to the 7900.  While the ipf6100 is a great printer, there are a lot of things about the 7900 that I like better.  From my perspective, Epson has been very aggressive about my issues, and since the last service (a week ago last Friday), the Auto Nozzle Detect Feature has only triggered one cleaning cycle ... correctly.  I had one clog while printing a print, before printing the next print it cleaned the affected channel.  They have also provided more than enough ink to make up for that lost in the unnecessary cleanings before the Auto Nozzle Detect feature was repaired.  It appears (knock on wood) that the new head has solved the problems of easy clogging, and the adjustment to the AID unit has solved the unnecessary cleaning cycles.  Of course, it's only been 10 days.

I think Canon printers are terrific, but they are not clog free. In all likelihood your printer has some clogs by this time.  The difference in technologies allows this to be more transparent to users, since clogs are handled by consuming head nozzles instead of a system that requires all nozzles to be maintained clog free.

I agree there seems to be quite a few people having problems with excessive clogs and with unnecessary cleanings from faulty AID readings.  It appears the design is OK, (neither feature is new to the 79/9900) because not everyone is having problems,  and it appears now Epson realizes the issue and is offering service pretty quickly for those having the problem.
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« Reply #36 on: February 18, 2009, 06:36:37 AM »
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Quote from: Wayne Fox
I moved from an ipf6100 to the 7900.  While the ipf6100 is a great printer, there are a lot of things about the 7900 that I like better.  From my perspective, Epson has been very aggressive about my issues, and since the last service (a week ago last Friday), the Auto Nozzle Detect Feature has only triggered one cleaning cycle ... correctly.  I had one clog while printing a print, before printing the next print it cleaned the affected channel.  They have also provided more than enough ink to make up for that lost in the unnecessary cleanings before the Auto Nozzle Detect feature was repaired.  It appears (knock on wood) that the new head has solved the problems of easy clogging, and the adjustment to the AID unit has solved the unnecessary cleaning cycles.  Of course, it's only been 10 days.

I think Canon printers are terrific, but they are not clog free. In all likelihood your printer has some clogs by this time.  The difference in technologies allows this to be more transparent to users, since clogs are handled by consuming head nozzles instead of a system that requires all nozzles to be maintained clog free.

I agree there seems to be quite a few people having problems with excessive clogs and with unnecessary cleanings from faulty AID readings.  It appears the design is OK, (neither feature is new to the 79/9900) because not everyone is having problems,  and it appears now Epson realizes the issue and is offering service pretty quickly for those having the problem.

You're quite right that it's likely that there have been some clogs on my 5100. The difference, of course, is that because there are tens of thousands of nozzles available for remapping, Ive never been affected by the problem. Kind of nice.

Sounds like things are beginning to work a bit better for you now Wayne, which is great news. It's good to hear that Epson has been aggressive about addressing these things on your 7900. I live in Maine. If I had encountered these problems, I doubt an Epson tech. would be rushing right over to have a look-see. I need to factor this in, I suppose.

Since you've owned a 6100 in the past, I'd be very interested in your opinion as it relates to pure print quality between these two printers. I gather that the 7900 beats out the Canon in the reproduction of reds but is this it or are there noticeable differences across the board?
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« Reply #37 on: February 18, 2009, 11:32:46 AM »
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Quote from: dwood
You're quite right that it's likely that there have been some clogs on my 5100. The difference, of course, is that because there are tens of thousands of nozzles available for remapping, Ive never been affected by the problem. Kind of nice.

Sounds like things are beginning to work a bit better for you now Wayne, which is great news. It's good to hear that Epson has been aggressive about addressing these things on your 7900. I live in Maine. If I had encountered these problems, I doubt an Epson tech. would be rushing right over to have a look-see. I need to factor this in, I suppose.

Since you've owned a 6100 in the past, I'd be very interested in your opinion as it relates to pure print quality between these two printers. I gather that the 7900 beats out the Canon in the reproduction of reds but is this it or are there noticeable differences across the board?

I would agree that the way Canon handles clogs is nice.  While there are tens of thousands of nozzles, I think a great number are used for printing... I'm not sure there are tens of thousands available for remapping.  No matter, there seems to be plenty.

My 11880 and 2 3800's have had very few clogs, probably less than 10 between the 3 of them over the past couple of years.  Hopefully the 7900, now that it seems to be running correctly, will be as reliable.  Using a little ink to clear an occasional clog isn't a big deal ... the 7900 should perform at that level.

Personally I've always felt Epson head technology allowed for more precise dot placement which they take advantage in the screening process visible sometimes  in very subtle detail (on very close side by side examination).  I would suspect a few may show some slight color differences because of the expanded gamuts.  I don't have much output left from the 6100 so I can reprint images to compare.  I know each print that comes out of the printer is fantastic, there's just something about it that seems a little better than even my 11880.  Maybe I'm just trying to justify the investment.

I prefer Epson's paper feed system (very straight), the 7900 roll feed mechanism is terrific (no spindle through the core), and it is very fast and quiet.  But the Canon served me well, no complaints.
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« Reply #38 on: February 18, 2009, 12:49:59 PM »
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Quote from: Wayne Fox
I would agree that the way Canon handles clogs is nice.  While there are tens of thousands of nozzles, I think a great number are used for printing... I'm not sure there are tens of thousands available for remapping.  No matter, there seems to be plenty.

My 11880 and 2 3800's have had very few clogs, probably less than 10 between the 3 of them over the past couple of years.  Hopefully the 7900, now that it seems to be running correctly, will be as reliable.  Using a little ink to clear an occasional clog isn't a big deal ... the 7900 should perform at that level.

Personally I've always felt Epson head technology allowed for more precise dot placement which they take advantage in the screening process visible sometimes  in very subtle detail (on very close side by side examination).  I would suspect a few may show some slight color differences because of the expanded gamuts.  I don't have much output left from the 6100 so I can reprint images to compare.  I know each print that comes out of the printer is fantastic, there's just something about it that seems a little better than even my 11880.  Maybe I'm just trying to justify the investment.

I prefer Epson's paper feed system (very straight), the 7900 roll feed mechanism is terrific (no spindle through the core), and it is very fast and quiet.  But the Canon served me well, no complaints.

Thanks for your thoughts on the topic.
« Last Edit: February 18, 2009, 12:50:12 PM by dwood » Logged

mrkahn
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« Reply #39 on: February 19, 2009, 10:01:16 PM »
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Just an update...parts arrived for my 9900 and service is due tomorrow to fix clogging problem.  I will let you know what happens.

Regards,
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