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Author Topic: Ansel Adams digital prints  (Read 9882 times)
Ernst Dinkla
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« Reply #20 on: December 04, 2008, 05:26:37 AM »
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Reading the technology paper:

Most speculative part of this message. The original prints are scanned/photographed with one of the Multi Spectral systems for art reproduction. They mention only three available in the US and Cruse scanners are more widely distributed. The institutes using them are mentioned and AA has one system according to their paper. There are more Multi Spectral systems worldwide though. Using that to scan and make B&W prints afterwards isn't so stupid as it seems. The several layers of spectral separations will show what was intended and what time did to the prints they scanned.
A European variant of that technology: http://www.lumiere-technology.com/index.htm

BTW, a crude translation of MS scanning  (two fluorescent lamps with different spectra, two scan passes) is used in the cheap HP A4 scanners G4010 and G4050, Image Engineering measured their color precision and concluded that it works compared to other consumer scanners. Slow scans though.
http://digitalkamera.image-engineering.de/...er_Color_Re.pdf


The printer will be a Z3100 and printing on HP's Baryte Satin Art, HP gives a >180 years estimation for it (HP figures, not yet Wilhelm).
see:
http://h10088.www1.hp.com/cda/gap/display/...5083_4000_100__

The AA page says: This is a heavy paper that mimics the look and feel of gelatin silver paper. And refers to >180 years somewhere else.
The speculation that it is using the 4 B&W inks may be false though, on that paper it will be PK, MG, LG.

Constantly self calibrating, 12 color, 4 gray inks etc is used for the printer's description.


Ernst Dinkla

Try: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Wide_Inkjet_Printers/
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Chris_Brown
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« Reply #21 on: December 04, 2008, 09:22:54 AM »
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Quote from: Dan Wells
They're scanning the PRINTS (it's described on their site), which makes sense due to AA's skill as a master printer - if they scanned the negatives, they'd have to find an artist who could duplicate in Photoshop what he did in the darkroom.
This then begs the question: what size prints were scanned? I wouldn't want to buy a "replica" larger than the original.

I saw several of his exhibits over the years and don't recall anything larger than a 20x24, with the majority being 16x20.
« Last Edit: December 04, 2008, 09:30:27 AM by Chris_Brown » Logged

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JimGoshorn
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« Reply #22 on: December 04, 2008, 10:40:19 AM »
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Quote from: Ernst Dinkla
The printer will be a Z3100 and printing on HP's Baryte Satin Art, HP gives a >180 years estimation for it (HP figures, not yet Wilhelm).

Has anyone had a chance to compare HP Baryte Satin Art to Harman FB Al, Hahnamuhle Photo Rag Baryta or Hahnamuhle Fine Art Baryta?
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Colorwave
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« Reply #23 on: December 04, 2008, 07:50:21 PM »
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Quote from: JimGoshorn
Has anyone had a chance to compare HP Baryte Satin Art to Harman FB Al, Hahnamuhle Photo Rag Baryta or Hahnamuhle Fine Art Baryta?
I've tried the HP Satin Barite and the Hahnemuhle Photo Rag Baryta.  The HP paper seems ever so slightly smoother, but I like the texture of both.  The biggest difference to me is that the Hahnemuhle paper is heavier and lays nice and flat after printing, which is not the case with the HP paper.  I'm really happy with the Photo Rag Baryta.  
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Geoff Wittig
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« Reply #24 on: December 04, 2008, 08:15:04 PM »
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Quote from: JimGoshorn
Has anyone had a chance to compare HP Baryte Satin Art to Harman FB Al, Hahnamuhle Photo Rag Baryta or Hahnamuhle Fine Art Baryta?

HP Baryte Satin has a reasonably subtle "stochastic looking" surface texture and a reflectivity that are essentially identical to that of Hahnemuhle's Photo rag pearl- which is no bad thing. The image quality is very high indeed, and I've even gotten really good oranges & reds on both these papers. Unfortunately, HP Baryte satin is just a bit too thin, and it tends to cockle (or develop ripples) under the inkload, especially with large prints that have a lot of dark areas. Hahnemuhle's various Photo rag variants are much thicker and more solid feeling in the hand, and hold up fine under the inkload.

Harman FB AI is quite different, with an extremely glossy surface texture. It tends to provide a bit more perceived fine detail, and d-max is fabulous, but I find it way too shiny and delicate for my photos, and the OBA load gives it a super-bright blue/white tone. Some people love it, though.

You may also want to check out Crane silver rag. It provides a d-max just as deep as Harman FB AI, without the supergloss finish. Hand feel is also nice, and it's a bit more resistant to scratches. The surface texture is a bit less pleasant than the photo rags, though.

I have some Hahnemuhle photo rag baryta on order; I'm hoping for a slightly better d-max than HP Baryte satin or photo rag pearl provide.
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uaiomex
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« Reply #25 on: December 29, 2008, 09:48:18 PM »
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Is this a clue?
Charles Cramer Workshops page on Ansel Adams  Gallery:  "many HP 9180s, an Epson 3800, and an HP Z3100"

Happy new year everyone!
Eduardo
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