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Author Topic: Why I almost didn't buy my Gura Gear Kiboko bag ...  (Read 15771 times)
abiggs
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« Reply #20 on: January 01, 2009, 05:30:06 PM »
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You bet, Khurram. Thanks for the feedback. I will work with my web designer to help me put many more images on the site. We will be signing up dealers very soon, so this will also help people go out and touch the bags in person. This will take some time to get the network filled out, so don't expect it to happen quickly. I will also be in Tanzania for 3 weeks this month, which slows the process down a bit.
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Andy Biggs
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Africa Photo Safaris | Workshops | Fine Art Prints
reburns
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« Reply #21 on: February 24, 2009, 01:02:46 PM »
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I would just like to back up dalethorn with his point, although I'd say he described it incorrectly.  For backpacking, you want the heavy weight up high and close to your back.  The added backpack weight throws your center of gravity to the rear, and so your posture is compensated by leaning forward.  If the weight is up high, then you don't have to lean forward nearly as far as if the weight is down low.  The problem with camera gear is that it's all the heavy stuff....

This has nothing with what part of your body bears the weight.  You still put most all weight down to the hips, unless you are scrambling.  Dalethorn has also got it right that the high weight needs to be secured from shifting around, which is just common sense.
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OldRoy
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« Reply #22 on: February 24, 2009, 01:17:18 PM »
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Quote from: abiggs
We will be signing up dealers very soon, so this will also help people go out and touch the bags in person.
Andy
Do you have any plans for UK dealerships?
Roy
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abiggs
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« Reply #23 on: February 24, 2009, 07:49:09 PM »
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Quote from: OldRoy
Andy
Do you have any plans for UK dealerships?
Roy

I do, indeed. I have been quietly working on developing a retailer channel both here in the states, Canada and overseas. I am waiting on a few items, such as more inventory, before I can proceed with earnest.
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Andy Biggs
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Africa Photo Safaris | Workshops | Fine Art Prints
RoyS
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« Reply #24 on: March 07, 2009, 02:37:25 PM »
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Quote from: abiggs
I do, indeed. I have been quietly working on developing a retailer channel both here in the states, Canada and overseas. I am waiting on a few items, such as more inventory, before I can proceed with earnest.

I received this bag last week and am very impressed with it. Any Canadians buying this bag from Guragear should be aware that if you choose to have it delivered by UPS you will get charged an extra $56 Broker Fee by UPS. I suggest you choose delivery by USPS. My last USPS shipment was from RRS and had only a $8.00 "Handling Fee" instead. It arrived in fewer days than the UPS  delivery.

Ciao,
Roy
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larryg
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« Reply #25 on: March 07, 2009, 05:08:16 PM »
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considering a purchase.
Going to Patagonia in April and will be taking more gear than usual (back up 1ds body) along with a 400 f5.6  (Canon)  85L 1.2 II, 24-70 zoom, 70-200 f4 zoom, 1.4 telex, pano head, misc items

Currently my choice is the Nature Trekker.  Deep enough to allow pro size bodies to fit.

It seems that the dimensions of this case falls between the Nature Trekker AW and the Photo Trekker AW?
but the weight is 1/2 of the Photo Trekker AW  (8.5 lbs)

Since the weight of the Kiboko is 1/2 the weight of the Photo Trekker AW is the padding on this bag sufficient to protect the contents inside?
« Last Edit: March 07, 2009, 05:21:38 PM by larryg » Logged
RoyS
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« Reply #26 on: March 07, 2009, 05:44:43 PM »
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Quote from: larryg
considering a purchase.
Going to Patagonia in April and will be taking more gear than usual (back up 1ds body) along with a 400 f5.6  (Canon)  85L 1.2 II, 24-70 zoom, 70-200 f4 zoom, 1.4 telex, pano head, misc items

Currently my choice is the Nature Trekker.  Deep enough to allow pro size bodies to fit.

It seems that the dimensions of this case falls between the Nature Trekker AW and the Photo Trekker AW?
but the weight is 1/2 of the Photo Trekker AW  (8.5 lbs)

Since the weight of the Kiboko is 1/2 the weight of the Photo Trekker AW is the padding on this bag sufficient to protect the contents inside?

I got out some calipers and measured the thickness of the Kiboko's outside walls. It imeasured 3/8" - the same as my Lowenpro Slingshot 300 AW.
In my opinion, the foam is the right density - moderately firm but not real hard.

The bag has a large number of padded dividers:
4 longitudinal dividers which are 1/2 the pack height. These divide the two pack halves in half creating 4 quarter width compartments.
6 which are 1/2 pack width and fit from the center divider to the outside wall; and
10 which are 1/4 pack width - fitting horizontally between the pack walls, longitudinal dividers and center divider. You won't run out of options for arranging it.
All the surfaces are velcroed so you have complete control of their placement.

I like the strap system which does allow comfortable carrying of a heavy load with padded straps and all the stabilizing straps to cinch it snug so the load doesn't sway around.

It is nice to see an item like this before purchasing it, but until there are more dealers pictures and descriptions are all you have to base your decision on.

Ciao,
Roy

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larryg
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« Reply #27 on: March 07, 2009, 06:37:10 PM »
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Quote from: RoyS
I got out some calipers and measured the thickness of the Kiboko's outside walls. It imeasured 3/8" - the same as my Lowenpro Slingshot 300 AW.
In my opinion, the foam is the right density - moderately firm but not real hard.

The bag has a large number of padded dividers:
4 longitudinal dividers which are 1/2 the pack height. These divide the two pack halves in half creating 4 quarter width compartments.
6 which are 1/2 pack width and fit from the center divider to the outside wall; and
10 which are 1/4 pack width - fitting horizontally between the pack walls, longitudinal dividers and center divider. You won't run out of options for arranging it.
All the surfaces are velcroed so you have complete control of their placement.

I like the strap system which does allow comfortable carrying of a heavy load with padded straps and all the stabilizing straps to cinch it snug so the load doesn't sway around.

It is nice to see an item like this before purchasing it, but until there are more dealers pictures and descriptions are all you have to base your decision on.

Ciao,
Roy

Thanks for your reply.  Personal testimony goes a long way.   I probably will order this weekend  My favorite bag was once the Pro Trekker AW (and about 45lbs of weight) but I just don't want to carry more than 25lbs or so any more  but need to transport all the backup gear to site.

Again thanks for your input
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larryg
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« Reply #28 on: March 07, 2009, 07:53:48 PM »
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great images of the bag

http://echeng.com/journal/2008/11/07/gura-...oko-camera-bag/

This did it for me
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dchew
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« Reply #29 on: March 07, 2009, 08:32:44 PM »
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Quote from: reburns
I would just like to back up dalethorn with his point, although I'd say he described it incorrectly.  For backpacking, you want the heavy weight up high and close to your back.  The added backpack weight throws your center of gravity to the rear, and so your posture is compensated by leaning forward.  If the weight is up high, then you don't have to lean forward nearly as far as if the weight is down low.  The problem with camera gear is that it's all the heavy stuff....

This has nothing with what part of your body bears the weight.  You still put most all weight down to the hips, unless you are scrambling.  Dalethorn has also got it right that the high weight needs to be secured from shifting around, which is just common sense.

I totally agree...
The key to load transfer with backpacks is two adjustments:  The load adjusters connected from the top of the bag to the apex of the shoulder strap, and the hip adjustment that wraps the load around from the back to the sides of the hips.  Pick up any medium to large sized internal frame backpack; they all have the same adjustments.  The problem with the short camera backpacks is that if you lower the pack so the hip belt rests where it should (on the top of your hip bones), then the top of the bag is in between your shoulder blades instead of behind your head (yeah, I'm 6'4").  There's just no way to transfer the load from that low of a position.

Andy, maybe a frame sheet extension off the bottom of the bag so the hip belt is 6" lower?  Or how about a really skinny but long design, almost like a 600mm lens case?

Dave Chew
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ChrisHA
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« Reply #30 on: March 28, 2009, 05:49:38 PM »
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NOT!  I love the Kiboko bag as a lightweight travel bag and shooting bag combo  

Why?  Because small airlines don't try to take it away from me!  With my rolling bag, I had to argue not to gate check it, even though I knew that it would fit under the seat.  With the Kiboko in backpack mode, airline staff would take one look at the straps and leave me alone (could get caught in conveyor belts).  And for some reason - karma or whatever - I even get offered the use of plane closets more often.

The one and only time that I lost the battle to forced check in, nothing was damaged as I stuffed mitts/gloves/hats/baggies firmly around my long lens and in both outer pockets to minimize vibrations.  To minimize tampering, I use TSA locks and orange ties which compliment the orange Kiboko logo along with an orange neoprene handle (in hopes that it looks less like a camera bag).  Fragile labels enabled me to use the special handling service w/o having to blab (tip off) about what was inside vs having to use the horrid "toss down a chute" gate check service.

To reduce walk-around weight during long airport layovers, I use a small luggage cart with the Kiboko straps tucked neatly away.  To my surprise, no one has counted the cart as a 3rd item on 6 different flights.

For me, the Kiboko works great as a shooting bag because I have easy access to everything - gear AND personal items.  I could set-up and break-down quickly with the bag draped over my knees in a van/car (impossible with a full flap bag unless you invade someone else's space or end up dumping items onto the floor).   On my next trip, I look forward to having lenses mounted before leaving my room which will streamline my bags and overall workflow.

Plus as advertised, I shaved 4 lbs. off my normal load and the bag always fit under the airplane seat or in overhead compartments.  And lastly, there's much more capacity for miscellaneous items than was expected

So, thank you Andy ~/~


Chris

www.wildliferhythms.com



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