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Author Topic: Tripod handling  (Read 2917 times)
DiaAzul
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« on: March 21, 2005, 03:42:53 PM »
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If you are just carrying camera equipment and nothing else then you can try Lowerpro camera bags. I have a computreker which has a special tripod mountain harness on the back. Admittedly, I only use this when travelling from A to B on public transport and not when hiking. When hiking I dump the tripod and carry a monopod instead and find some way to wedge it in position to keep the camera stable. Obviously this is not as sturdy as a full tripod rig, but I do find that it is a bit more practicle than carrying the weight of a three legged monster.
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David Plummer    http://photo.tanzo.org/
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« Reply #1 on: March 22, 2005, 11:06:52 AM »
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Similar to Joja, I insert one leg of the tripod in the lower pocket, which is usually used for a water bottle, then use side compression straps to fasten the upper part.  This usually requires me to take off the pack to get to the tripod, but I prefer it that way since I take more time in getting the picture without having to deal with the pain, not to mention trying to maintain my balance while rock-hopping, stream crossing or crawling under logs to get into position.  Otherwise, I'll simply carry the tripod Rabo style.
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julien
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« Reply #2 on: March 21, 2005, 04:48:40 AM »
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During Hiking, I am using a backpack for my camera and lenses...
But I have never found a clever way to carry a tripod.

How are you doing and what is the best way to carry a tripod for hiking ?

Thanks
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danmitchell
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« Reply #3 on: March 21, 2005, 12:54:12 PM »
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I think there must be a better solution, especially when carrying a multi-day backpacking load.

I carry a small tripod in an outside pocket on my pack but I really end up having to take the pack off to get at it - which is a fair amount of trouble to go through if you take a lot of photos. I end up not using the tripod all too often because I don't want to take the pack off... again.

(On day-hikes I either carry it in a large Mountainsmith lumbar pack which can swing around to the front or I carry it in my hands.)

It seems like there should be some sort of "tripod holster" that could either be attached to the shoulder harness in front or else attached to the pack and positioned so that the tripod could be removed while wearing the pack.

Dan
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Jack Flesher
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« Reply #4 on: March 21, 2005, 09:07:36 PM »
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I have a "beavertail" flap on the back of my trekking pack (Dana Designs Swiftcurrent -- also a rear-load design, which is beneficial for acessing camera gear), and the tripod can be conveniently lashed under that.  I believe most any outdoor store sells versions of these that can be attached to other packs that don't come with them.

Cheers,
Jack
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Joja
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« Reply #5 on: March 22, 2005, 10:39:32 AM »
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it depends on the backpack which im using.
if im using my normal camera backpack (lowepro), then i attach it by using the special tripod holden in the front. or i hold it in my arms (like a gun) this way youll can use it whenever you want, and carry it for a long time..
if hiking with a big backpack, ill put it in the open botleholder on the side of the backpack and secure the top with the sidestraps, or i carry it in my arms.
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Lisa Nikodym
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« Reply #6 on: March 22, 2005, 04:19:13 PM »
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I guess I have a slightly improved variant.  Like others above, the tripod (in lightweight carrying bag) goes into one of the exterior pockets, while one of the pack's straps ties through the loop on top of the carrying bag to keep it in place.  My variant is that I'm always hiking with my spouse  Smiley , so one of us wears the pack while the other gets the tripod in & out, and noone needs to take the whole pack off.  I guess you need to find a hiking companion who doesn't mind being part of your photographic gear.  :laugh:

Lisa
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Stef_T
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« Reply #7 on: March 24, 2005, 10:59:03 PM »
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I guess you need to find a hiking companion who doesn't mind being part of your photographic gear. :laugh:

And for those who are wondering my wages start at 25$ an hour plus expenses.
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jackperk
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« Reply #8 on: March 27, 2005, 02:38:24 PM »
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My options are two:

As stated above, I sometimes use the tripod as a welcome walking stick when maneuvering rocky or sloped terrain for instance.

Or, I have rigged up the following: Pipe clamps tightened around two points of one of the tripod legs, securing D-rings to the tripod leg. Then I attach a shoulder strap to those D-rings and sling the tripod over my shoulder.

jack
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pcg
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« Reply #9 on: March 21, 2005, 10:50:53 AM »
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Depending on its size, either strap it to your backback, or if it's really big (for instance, I carry an old Zone VI wooden tripod) throw it over your shoulder. Some tripods are sold w/ carrying bags, but they tend to be awkward. Sort of like tripods.
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Stef_T
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« Reply #10 on: March 21, 2005, 09:54:34 PM »
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Why not use the side compression straps?
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61Dynamic
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« Reply #11 on: March 24, 2005, 11:34:40 PM »
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Quote
Quote
I guess you need to find a hiking companion who doesn't mind being part of your photographic gear.  :laugh:

And for those who are wondering my wages start at 25$ an hour plus expenses.  Cheesy
I'll do it for $20/hour. I need the exercise.  :p


I have the LowePro MiniTrekker. Not a very well designed bag IMHO. Perhaps it's well done as far as padded backpak-bags go; I wouldn't know as it's the only one I've used.

To the point, it as a tripod holder thing on the back which does not work very well at all. Part of the issue is my tripod which weighs in at 9lbs. but I degress. The thing is quite cumbersome and near impossable to get the backpack on once the tripod is attached. I have to squat and use the tripod to support the pack while I get it on.

In addition to being very difficult to use, it makes me look like a doofus when trying to get it on.

Mabye I am a doofus and am just not using it right. The thing came with no instructions whatsoever (as if I'd use them) and didn't even point to the spot where the tripod holder is at. All that was mentioned was a tripod holder existed on this thing.

Whatever the case may be, the mechanics of it are poorly done. The pack sticks out far enough where the tripods weight would make it impossable to use anyway.

My tripod (when I bring it) doubles as a walking stick.
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