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Author Topic: The Third Exposure Variable  (Read 2398 times)
Ray
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« on: January 07, 2003, 09:20:58 AM »
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I think the ISO bracketing concept sounds really useful. I'm always reluctant to move up to a higher ISO speed because of inevitable increased noise. To be given a choice of different combinations of shutter speed and ISO ratings to assess after the event is great.

A continuously variable ISO rating that automatically adjusts to whatever aperture/shutter combination one has chosen might be even more useful and not just for the sake of more accurate exposures. I've sometimes found myself in a situation photographing birds in varying light conditions with a 400mm lens and having to switch back and forth between F8 and F5.6 and/or ISO 100 and 400 in order to maintain a sufficient shutter speed for a steady shot. Not ideal and I've messed up a few shots, and probably missed a few shots as a result.
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Richard
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« Reply #1 on: January 07, 2003, 04:57:12 PM »
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Any chance I could be told why my reply was deleted?  It was a sensible reply, no criticism, no rudeness.  There was a typo which I came back to (so I can confirm it existed on the site!) and which I added a one-line correction to.
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flash
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« Reply #2 on: January 07, 2003, 10:17:44 PM »
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I saw Richards reply earlier. It was definately there. HMMMM??
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Richard
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« Reply #3 on: January 08, 2003, 10:04:00 AM »
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Michael - the only glitch is in the users, I think!  This topic has started in two areas, and I answered in one then went back to the other one, thinking it had been there.
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Dixon Zalit
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« Reply #4 on: January 07, 2003, 01:08:17 AM »
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Michael's article is right on time.

I had beed wondering just the other day about how far high useable ISOs will go in the coming years on digital cameras. If the 1Ds is any indication, we have only just begun! The next step will be cameras with fixed exposure and variable ISO. Wouldn't it be great to set the exposure where you want it, say f8 and 1/500, and let ISO adjustments do the rest? Throw in a wider exposure latitude for imaging sensors and we may have virtually idiot-proof exposure. What do your think?
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PDW
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« Reply #5 on: January 07, 2003, 12:13:37 PM »
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Do any of the DSLR's have a mode where they will automatically bump up ISO before they allow shutter speed to drop below a certain value?  Conversely, this mode should decrease ISO before increasing the shutter speed.
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« Reply #6 on: January 07, 2003, 05:44:48 PM »
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Richard. No message of yours has been deleted. I'm the only person that can do that I have haven't been online all day.

Please post it again.

Michael
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Richard
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« Reply #7 on: January 08, 2003, 04:40:30 AM »
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OK, here goes again.  I'm pleased somebody actually saw it existed the first time though - I don't doubt Michael's word that he didn't delete it, but it cearly existed, so there's a glitch somewhere!
When I first heard about digital cameras, I assumed the standard ISO ratings would go out the window - or be available as an option to those who wish to stick to them before making the full transition.  People have suggested ISO bracketing, but still in the standard terms of 100, 200, 400 etc.  If I'm out wildlife or people shooting with a 100-400 f4.45-6.3, and always want it as wide as possible for the given length (and so set that as default), I should be able to program the camera to not fire below 1/125 (my tolerance - about 80% of shots are acceptable), and to choose the ISO itself according to the exposure required.  Current camera 'thinking' means it would choose eg ISO 400, assuming such programming options existed.  But why not ISO 324 if that is the lowest it can manage?  Or on another shot, why ISO 200 when ISO 136 works as well?  I'm assuming there is a (changeable) default to make the ISO as low as possible.  ISO bracketing could then be done (if desired) in chosen increments from the ISO chosen by the camera - eg 50 above and below. It might also be that I could choose a threshold for ISO - not below 800, for example.  Sounds slightly complex to have to tell your camera these things, but for most people's style of shooting, it's probably only done for each type of shootin g- if you're off shooting landscapes, you set it for the day or trip once.  Then you go back to your Shooting Style 2 (codenamed 'Candids') when in people mode etc.  Once programmed, a simple change is all that should be required.
Richard.
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