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Author Topic: NEC 3090 .... resolution settings  (Read 2629 times)
bellimages
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« on: December 28, 2008, 12:42:00 PM »
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I have a question regarding the resolution setting of my new NEC3090

The maximum resolution available on my Mac is 1680 x 1050. The specs for the 3090 say that it can display a resolution of 2560x1600. Do I need to purchase a different video card if I want to see that quality of resolution? Am I even correct in thinking that I'd see a higher resolution photo at that setting?
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Jan Bell, Owner/Photographer, Bell Images
www.bellimages.com

"Making the simple complicated is commonplace, Making the complicated simple, awesomely simple, that's creativity."    Charles Mingus
walter.sk
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« Reply #1 on: December 28, 2008, 12:55:08 PM »
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Quote from: bellimages
I have a question regarding the resolution setting of my new NEC3090

The maximum resolution available on my Mac is 1680 x 1050. The specs for the 3090 say that it can display a resolution of 2560x1600. Do I need to purchase a different video card if I want to see that quality of resolution? Am I even correct in thinking that I'd see a higher resolution photo at that setting?


I have the NEC 3090.  It is my understanding that the monitor looks and functions best when running at its native resolution, which is 2560x1600 pixels, at 101 pixels per inch.  You have a monitor that displays almost the entire AdobeRGB gamut with excellent color rendition.  It would be a shame to run it at a resolution less than its native resolution.  You can buy a card such as the nVidia Geforce 9800GT  with 500mb of video ram for under $100 that can easily run the NEC 3090 at full resolution and have enough video ram to take advantage of the new Photoshop's ability to use the video GPU.

In addition, the NEC does much better on a DVI-D cable, and I suspect you have to run it on DVI-I right now, which gives you an analog rather than digital signal.
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bellimages
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« Reply #2 on: December 28, 2008, 02:15:53 PM »
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Quote from: walter.sk
I have the NEC 3090.  It is my understanding that the monitor looks and functions best when running at its native resolution, which is 2560x1600 pixels, at 101 pixels per inch.  You have a monitor that displays almost the entire AdobeRGB gamut with excellent color rendition.  It would be a shame to run it at a resolution less than its native resolution.  You can buy a card such as the nVidia Geforce 9800GT  with 500mb of video ram for under $100 that can easily run the NEC 3090 at full resolution and have enough video ram to take advantage of the new Photoshop's ability to use the video GPU.

In addition, the NEC does much better on a DVI-D cable, and I suspect you have to run it on DVI-I right now, which gives you an analog rather than digital signal.


I'm feeling a little "stupid" here. Maybe you can help me out ....

I am going to be purchasing a new MacPro computer in a couple of weeks to run this beast of a monitor. I had intended on buying the NVIDIA GeForce 8800 graphics card. Do you know if this will run the monitor at 2560x1600? Apple does not offer the NVIDIA 9800GT as an option. Would I be better off not upgrading to the 8800 when I order the computer, and buying the 9800 card?

What are you referring to when you talk about Photoshops ability to use the video GPU (what is GPU)?

I am running the monitor with one of the two cables that came with the unit -- the DVI-D (Duallink cable). So I am not using the analog cable.


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Jan Bell, Owner/Photographer, Bell Images
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"Making the simple complicated is commonplace, Making the complicated simple, awesomely simple, that's creativity."    Charles Mingus
walter.sk
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« Reply #3 on: December 28, 2008, 03:02:58 PM »
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Quote from: bellimages
I'm feeling a little "stupid" here. Maybe you can help me out ....

I am going to be purchasing a new MacPro computer in a couple of weeks to run this beast of a monitor. I had intended on buying the NVIDIA GeForce 8800 graphics card. Do you know if this will run the monitor at 2560x1600? Apple does not offer the NVIDIA 9800GT as an option. Would I be better off not upgrading to the 8800 when I order the computer, and buying the 9800 card?

What are you referring to when you talk about Photoshops ability to use the video GPU (what is GPU)?

I am running the monitor with one of the two cables that came with the unit -- the DVI-D (Duallink cable). So I am not using the analog cable.

I am sure fairly sure that any card coming with a MacPro would be able to pass a signal to the monitor at 2560x1600, but the way to make sure is to go to the website at www.nvidia.com, look up the geforce family of cards, find the 8800 and check the specs for it.

GPU is the graphics processing unit, and CS4 is able to utilize the power of the video card to help with processing the image.
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Edhopkins
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« Reply #4 on: December 29, 2008, 06:35:48 AM »
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Quote from: bellimages
I am going to be purchasing a new MacPro computer in a couple of weeks to run this beast of a monitor. I had intended on buying the NVIDIA GeForce 8800 graphics card. Do you know if this will run the monitor at 2560x1600? Apple does not offer the NVIDIA 9800GT as an option. Would I be better off not upgrading to the 8800 when I order the computer, and buying the 9800 card?

I want to buy a new desk top mac to replace my dual processor G4--which will not run Photoshop CS4--but I am waiting for the next generation of mac desktops to come out. They are expected to come out soon.  See the Mac Rumor Website:  http://buyersguide.macrumors.com/#Mac_Pro  The advice of this web site is not to buy the Mac Pro.  (it is not like they are on sale or anything.)

I have waited about four months now; I am going to wait until it shows up.

ed
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bellimages
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« Reply #5 on: December 29, 2008, 08:16:08 AM »
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Quote from: Edhopkins
I want to buy a new desk top mac to replace my dual processor G4--which will not run Photoshop CS4--but I am waiting for the next generation of mac desktops to come out. They are expected to come out soon.  See the Mac Rumor Website:  http://buyersguide.macrumors.com/#Mac_Pro  The advice of this web site is not to buy the Mac Pro.  (it is not like they are on sale or anything.)

I have waited about four months now; I am going to wait until it shows up.

ed
Baltimore


Interesting that you bring this up. Ironically, I've been waiting for a year and a half to buy a MacPro. The BIG aluminum box hasn't been updated in years -- way past the norm for Apple. I realize that what's inside the box is way more important than the housing itself. But I for one, have never liked the massive size of the case. So I'm hoping to see a redesign of it, as well as updates to the processors. If Apple doesn't update the MacPro with Intel i7 chips at MacWorld, I'll be really disappointed. Regardless, my wait will be over. I can't wait any longer.

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Jan Bell, Owner/Photographer, Bell Images
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"Making the simple complicated is commonplace, Making the complicated simple, awesomely simple, that's creativity."    Charles Mingus
bellimages
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« Reply #6 on: December 29, 2008, 08:26:22 AM »
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Quote from: walter.sk
I am sure fairly sure that any card coming with a MacPro would be able to pass a signal to the monitor at 2560x1600, but the way to make sure is to go to the website at www.nvidia.com, look up the geforce family of cards, find the 8800 and check the specs for it.

GPU is the graphics processing unit, and CS4 is able to utilize the power of the video card to help with processing the image.

Thanks Walter. I went to the NVIDIA website and compared the two cards -- 8800GT and 9800GTX. They both will drive a monitor at 2560x1600 resolution. Both have 512MB of memory.
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Jan Bell, Owner/Photographer, Bell Images
www.bellimages.com

"Making the simple complicated is commonplace, Making the complicated simple, awesomely simple, that's creativity."    Charles Mingus
bellimages
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« Reply #7 on: December 29, 2008, 08:36:23 AM »
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Another question ..... related to the NEC 3090 .....

When I set my 3090 to display my MacPro laptop on the screen, I can set it to either "stretch" to fit the widescreen format (in which case everything is distorted), or set at "normal" (in which case I have a black vertical band on the left and right side of my screen. Is there anyway around this?
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Jan Bell, Owner/Photographer, Bell Images
www.bellimages.com

"Making the simple complicated is commonplace, Making the complicated simple, awesomely simple, that's creativity."    Charles Mingus
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