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Author Topic: Ixpress without Data Bank  (Read 5819 times)
abcdefghi_rstuvwxyz
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« on: December 31, 2008, 09:57:20 PM »
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What's the reliability of Ixpress's data bank.
What if the data bank is broken?
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ixpressraf
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« Reply #1 on: January 01, 2009, 02:04:08 AM »
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The data bank is extremely reliable. i have several ixpresses and never had problems. The only thing that happened once was the flatcable coming loose from the disk. This was after extreme vibrations.
The HD can always be replaced by Hasselblad as it has special software on it.
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abcdefghi_rstuvwxyz
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« Reply #2 on: January 01, 2009, 11:42:10 AM »
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Quote from: ixpressraf
The data bank is extremely reliable. i have several ixpresses and never had problems. The only thing that happened once was the flatcable coming loose from the disk. This was after extreme vibrations.
The HD can always be replaced by Hasselblad as it has special software on it.

How extremely reliable? such as hours of operation, like the number of expsure specified for the high-end DSLR.
I doubt any extremely reliable hard disk in this world. The hard disk in the notebook computer is often the 1st thing to go, and it's not uncommon just within 3 years of operation.
But that's OK as long as the hard disk is easily replacible.

Now, other than replaced by Hasselblad, is there  a way to down load that special software (paid of unpaid), then replace it DIY?
If not, what's the cost for Hasselblad to replace it? Would that be cheaper than buying a used complete Ixpress?

Any alternative other than replace the databank? I'm thinking to tether to a 8.9"/2lbs notebook computer (the $349 Atom CPU based notebook from  Acer or Lenovo), if the battery can last long enough. Any known problem with this?
« Last Edit: January 01, 2009, 11:43:17 AM by abcdefghi_rstuvwxyz » Logged
ixpressraf
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« Reply #3 on: January 01, 2009, 11:53:44 AM »
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What is reliable?Huh?  i have seen banks with 798000 shots on it. i have seen CF cards crashin after 25 shots..... i shoot ixpress since 2004 and never ever had a problem. on location i shoot thetered to a powerbook 12inch 1,5Ghz.
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abcdefghi_rstuvwxyz
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« Reply #4 on: January 01, 2009, 12:05:54 PM »
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Quote from: ixpressraf
What is reliable?Huh?  I have seen banks with 798000 shots on it. i have seen CF cards crashin after 25 shots..... i shoot ixpress since 2004 and never ever had a problem. on location i shoot thetered to a powerbook 12inch 1,5Ghz.

Special case is always there. In general, the 1st class flash memory is more reliable than the 1st class hard disk. I don't think it's wise to argue about that.
But that difference is irrelevant to me. Today a 16GB Lexar CF only costs ~$60, and I can carry 5 of that without breath.
No, the Ixpress databank doesn't have to be better than CF in any sense. I just want to make sure it makes sense to get an Ixpress than to pay the extra for a P20. The saving is around $0.5k to $1k.
 
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Dustbak
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« Reply #5 on: January 01, 2009, 01:09:31 PM »
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I have used an imagebank and took it everywhere without ever running into any problem. I do hate to carry one those things around and prefer CF cards anyday, there was one thing I really liked about the Ixpress and the image bank. The cable and its attachments! Thin round smooth cable with a balljoint connected to bank & back, this is something I really wish Hasselblad would somehow bring back to their current backs.

I have heard more firewire cables or ports being wrecked than imagebanks over the years. So, yes. You are right harddrives do tend to be more vulnerable than CF cards but in practice the imagebank has proven itself as a very reliable piece of equipment.

Personally I would no longer go for any back that has no option to use CF cards but I like my comfort too much. If you can I would advice saving a bit longer and get a 22MP back (unless you really need/want square).
« Last Edit: January 01, 2009, 01:23:50 PM by Dustbak » Logged
Kumar
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« Reply #6 on: January 01, 2009, 07:06:10 PM »
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Quote from: abcdefghi_rstuvwxyz
Any alternative other than replace the databank? I'm thinking to tether to a 8.9"/2lbs notebook computer (the $349 Atom CPU based notebook from  Acer or Lenovo), if the battery can last long enough. Any known problem with this?


I'm not sure any of these Netbooks have a Firewire port or a PCMCIA/Express Card slot. So how would you tether? If you have a solution, I'd be interested to know.

Cheers,
Kumar
« Last Edit: January 01, 2009, 07:07:35 PM by Kumar » Logged

abcdefghi_rstuvwxyz
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« Reply #7 on: January 01, 2009, 08:30:34 PM »
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Quote from: Kumar
I'm not sure any of these Netbooks have a Firewire port or a PCMCIA/Express Card slot. So how would you tether? If you have a solution, I'd be interested to know.

Cheers,
Kumar

Thanks, I didn't think about that.  Is it possible to use USB2Firewire or PCMCIA2Firewire converter?

 
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Kumar
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« Reply #8 on: January 01, 2009, 08:46:25 PM »
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Quote from: abcdefghi_rstuvwxyz
Thanks, I didn't think about that.  Is it possible to use USB2Firewire or PCMCIA2Firewire converter?

The USB to Firewire converter won't work. What's a PCMCIA to Firewire converter? You can use PCMCIA or ExpressCard Firewire cards which will work if they're powered by an external 12V battery. But these Netbooks do not have the slot. The Sony UX series and OQO model 1 have a 4-pin Firewire socket that can be used with a 6-pin to 4-pin Firewire cable. If anyone knows of another similar sized notebook or netbook I would appreciate the information.

Kumar
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ixpressraf
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« Reply #9 on: January 02, 2009, 01:58:28 AM »
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Why not use or the image bank and lcd on the back or a decent powerbook 12 inch?
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Kumar
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« Reply #10 on: January 02, 2009, 02:02:49 AM »
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Quote from: ixpressraf
Why not use or the image bank and lcd on the back or a decent powerbook 12 inch?

Or even an iBook, but I think a to z was asking about Windows.

Cheers,
Kumar
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ixpressraf
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« Reply #11 on: January 02, 2009, 02:11:48 AM »
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what would be the problem using a mac for shooting only?  Windows laptops seldom have enough powersupply to power up a digital back. With a powerbook it is no problem shooting thetered for a coupple of hours.
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Kumar
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« Reply #12 on: January 02, 2009, 02:24:50 AM »
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In fact, Windows laptops usually have a 4-pin Firewire port that does not supply any power to the device, so you'd need an external power source in any case. I believe some Mac laptops also have a problem supplying enough power through the firewire port when the battery goes below 50 or 60% of its capacity. I have an iBook for shooting only, and it performs well for this. But a Sony UX or OQO is much smaller, and can be carried easily in a coat pocket, or a waist pack, or simply velcroed to the tripod.

Kumar
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abcdefghi_rstuvwxyz
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« Reply #13 on: January 02, 2009, 02:31:15 AM »
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Quote from: Kumar
Or even an iBook, but I think a to z was asking about Windows.

Cheers,
Kumar


No preference Windows or Mac, but I prefer something small and light. It's for off-site.
From what I learned from here, the data bank is likely to be a dead-end.  
OK, I'll only consider the Hasselblad CF or similar grade stuffs.  

Thanks for all the information.  

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ixpressraf
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« Reply #14 on: January 02, 2009, 03:03:58 AM »
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why do you keep on telling the data bank is a dead end. The first thing i ordered when i bought my h3d was a data bank.It is to me the most reliable and superfast storage medium i have ever used. There are thousends of people daily shooting to image banks.
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abcdefghi_rstuvwxyz
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« Reply #15 on: January 02, 2009, 04:20:18 PM »
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Quote from: ixpressraf
why do you keep on telling the data bank is a dead end. The first thing i ordered when i bought my h3d was a data bank.It is to me the most reliable and superfast storage medium i have ever used. There are thousends of people daily shooting to image banks.

This is just for me, but not necessary applies to anyone else.  After all these messages, I'm more uncomfortable to trust it.
It's obvious if it goes dead, there is no easy way out. I don't think Hasselblad is commited to support that, and it surely won't be inexpensive.
It's safer for me just look for the CF version.

Again, this doesn't apply to everyone.
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Doug Peterson
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« Reply #16 on: January 02, 2009, 04:34:10 PM »
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Quote from: Kumar
In fact, Windows laptops usually have a 4-pin Firewire port that does not supply any power to the device, so you'd need an external power source in any case. I believe some Mac laptops also have a problem supplying enough power through the firewire port when the battery goes below 50 or 60% of its capacity. I have an iBook for shooting only, and it performs well for this. But a Sony UX or OQO is much smaller, and can be carried easily in a coat pocket, or a waist pack, or simply velcroed to the tripod.

Kumar

The Mac Firewire Port Power Problem is worthy of it's own acroynm. So let's coin it the MF3P problem (like PIN Number)...

The Power PC mac laptops had a certain FW voltage that was consistently provided to items running off of the bus power. Technically speaking this was above the "firewire spec" which was required and cited.

When apple went to Intel they dropped that voltage, presumably (?) because increasing battery life was a high priority. Technically they dropped it back "to within spec". The problem of course is many manufacturers (including digital back makers) had come to count on the higher-than-spec'd voltage, so the new "correct" voltage was suddenly too low. It varies from model to model, it varies on whether the laptop is plugged in or running off battery; it varies on how full the battery is; seemingly it even varies from day to day! The point is that Intel laptops cannot be relied on for powering digital backs. Phase One effectively solved that problem by offering a menu option to ignore the firewire power and run off the on-digital-back battery. Backs with no integrated batteries (e.g. H3D on a tech camera) will presumably have to have some less convenient solution (can a hassy expert pitch in some info here? Paul?).

So in short, I would suggest buying a used G4 laptop. The small file size shouldn't overly strain the older processor, and any heavy lifting (processing/stitching etc) would be done on a desktop after the shooting. Make sure to pick up an extra G4 laptop battery while you can since they wear out after X cycles and will be hard to find in another couple months. Though, do check with one of the Hasselblad gurus here to make sure their tethering software is compatible with G4s and whatever OS you feel comfortable running a G4 with.

Doug

Doug Peterson,  Head of Technical Services
Capture Integration, Phase One & Canon Dealer  |  Personal Portfolio
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DOUG PETERSON (dep@digitaltransitions.com), Digital Transitions
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Dustbak
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« Reply #17 on: January 03, 2009, 02:44:35 AM »
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I have used several different backs (Leaf & Hasselblad) with several different (15") MBP's. None of these had problems powering the backs, not even when the battery was below 50% which is generally stated to be the area where probems can start. Also booting up below 50% was no problem.

I would not advice to shoot tethered only on battery power with a laptop anyway because the backs do draw a lot of power! The battery lasts about halve of what it normally does. If you have to, you have to.
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David Grover / Phase One
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« Reply #18 on: January 03, 2009, 03:39:01 AM »
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Quote from: abcdefghi_rstuvwxyz
This is just for me, but not necessary applies to anyone else.  After all these messages, I'm more uncomfortable to trust it.
It's obvious if it goes dead, there is no easy way out. I don't think Hasselblad is commited to support that, and it surely won't be inexpensive.
It's safer for me just look for the CF version.

Again, this doesn't apply to everyone.

We are committed to support the older Image Banks and still repair / replace hard drives.  There is a set service charge of 550.

They are proven to be extremely reliable as users here have mentioned.

Best,


David


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David Grover
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« Reply #19 on: January 03, 2009, 03:40:48 AM »
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Quote from: dougpetersonci
When apple went to Intel they dropped that voltage, presumably (?) because increasing battery life was a high priority. Technically they dropped it back "to within spec". The problem of course is many manufacturers (including digital back makers) had come to count on the higher-than-spec'd voltage, so the new "correct" voltage was suddenly too low. It varies from model to model, it varies on whether the laptop is plugged in or running off battery; it varies on how full the battery is; seemingly it even varies from day to day! The point is that Intel laptops cannot be relied on for powering digital backs. Phase One effectively solved that problem by offering a menu option to ignore the firewire power and run off the on-digital-back battery. Backs with no integrated batteries (e.g. H3D on a tech camera) will presumably have to have some less convenient solution (can a hassy expert pitch in some info here? Paul?).


Capture Integration, Phase One & Canon Dealer  |  Personal Portfolio

This is not an issue with Hasselblad products.  If the MBP in question does not supply the correct power needed by the camera, then the onboard battery will 'top-up' to what is necessary.

Therefore you are free to use any laptop you choose.

Best,



David


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David Grover
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