Ad
Ad
Ad
Pages: [1]   Bottom of Page
Print
Author Topic: NEC LCD3090WQXi vs. NEC LCD3090W-BK-SV  (Read 8955 times)
pixie
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 9


« on: January 13, 2009, 01:24:35 AM »
ReplyReply

I just purchased the CD3090WQXi on the 29th of December - and now see that NEC has announced a new 30" monitor for release this month - LCD3090W-BK-SV. Does anyone know what the difference is between the two monitors? Do I have reason to be royally choked about this? (nothing is more irritating that to buy something only to discover it's been deemed obsolete within 10 days of purchase).

I love the size of this monitor but the backlight bleed on the LCD3090WQXi is quite significant. For the price this puppy set me back I have to say I wasn't particular impressed to see this. I haven't yet contact NEC support about but have been hunting around for information to determine if this amount of bleed is 'within spec' or not.... and now the new monitor announcement on top...

Shoot.
Logged
PeterAit
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1885



WWW
« Reply #1 on: January 13, 2009, 08:32:05 AM »
ReplyReply

Quote from: pixie
I just purchased the CD3090WQXi on the 29th of December - and now see that NEC has announced a new 30" monitor for release this month - LCD3090W-BK-SV. Does anyone know what the difference is between the two monitors? Do I have reason to be royally choked about this? (nothing is more irritating that to buy something only to discover it's been deemed obsolete within 10 days of purchase).

I love the size of this monitor but the backlight bleed on the LCD3090WQXi is quite significant. For the price this puppy set me back I have to say I wasn't particular impressed to see this. I haven't yet contact NEC support about but have been hunting around for information to determine if this amount of bleed is 'within spec' or not.... and now the new monitor announcement on top...

Shoot.

I believe that the BK means black bezel and the SV means it is bundled with the NEC SpectraView calibration software and puck.

Peter
Logged

Peter
"Photographic technique is a means to an end, never the end itself."
View my photos at http://www.peteraitken.com
pixie
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 9


« Reply #2 on: January 13, 2009, 09:14:09 AM »
ReplyReply

Quote from: PeterAit
I believe that the BK means black bezel and the SV means it is bundled with the NEC SpectraView calibration software and puck.

Peter

But I think there are hardware improvements as well (i.e. WQXi is 98% Adobe RGB, the SV 107%) and also am wondering if there are changes to the LUTs and puck/calibration integration. I think this is more than just a bundled package - as they had that before. The SV was newly announced at MacWorld - January 9th, 2009.
Logged
JonRoemer
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 131


WWW
« Reply #3 on: January 13, 2009, 09:23:34 AM »
ReplyReply

Quote from: pixie
But I think there are hardware improvements as well (i.e. WQXi is 98% Adobe RGB, the SV 107%) and also am wondering if there are changes to the LUTs and puck/calibration integration. I think this is more than just a bundled package - as they had that before. The SV was newly announced at MacWorld - January 9th, 2009.

Those spec's may be wrong.  NEC's web site lists the new model on their web site as 97% Adobe RGB.

This looks to be the 3090, as before, but packaged with the new puck/spectraview which is optimized for wider gamut monitors.

I just received a 3090 yesterday but haven't gotten to setting it up yet.
Logged

WillH
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 138


WWW
« Reply #4 on: January 13, 2009, 04:48:32 PM »
ReplyReply

That's correct- the only difference is that the LCD3090 is now available as a bundle with the new SpectraView II Pro Kit (custom calibrated sensor for the LCD3090WQXi and LCD2690WUXi2). There is no change to the hardware in the LCD3090. If you want to you can purchase the SVII-PRO-KIT separately from NEC.

The different gamut numbers are due to different calculation methods being quoted.

Quote from: JonRoemer
Those spec's may be wrong.  NEC's web site lists the new model on their web site as 97% Adobe RGB.

This looks to be the 3090, as before, but packaged with the new puck/spectraview which is optimized for wider gamut monitors.

I just received a 3090 yesterday but haven't gotten to setting it up yet.
Logged

Will Hollingworth
Senior Manager, Product Development
NEC Display Solutions of America, Inc.
pixie
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 9


« Reply #5 on: January 14, 2009, 12:11:12 AM »
ReplyReply

Quote from: WillH
That's correct- the only difference is that the LCD3090 is now available as a bundle with the new SpectraView II Pro Kit (custom calibrated sensor for the LCD3090WQXi and LCD2690WUXi2). There is no change to the hardware in the LCD3090. If you want to you can purchase the SVII-PRO-KIT separately from NEC.

The different gamut numbers are due to different calculation methods being quoted.

EXCELLENT - great news WillH! I will sleep better at night knowing the monitor is one in the same.

I trust the new calibration device can be purchased separately since I had just purchased the SpectaView II software last week.
Also then wondering - is this a new improved calibration device - one optimized for wide gamut monitors? Since I already own a Monaco DTP94 - a legacy device - I've no need to purchase another that is basically the same thing.
Logged
digitaldog
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 9004



WWW
« Reply #6 on: January 14, 2009, 08:45:08 AM »
ReplyReply

Quote from: pixie
Also then wondering - is this a new improved calibration device - one optimized for wide gamut monitors? Since I already own a Monaco DTP94 - a legacy device - I've no need to purchase another that is basically the same thing.

As good as the DTP94 is/was, its filter matrixes are not optimized for a wide gamut unit. If you're happy with the results, great. But I suspect a tuned colorimeter will produce superior results, especially in terms of white point calibration.
Logged

Andrew Rodney
Author “Color Management for Photographers”
http://digitaldog.net/
mbalensiefer
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 297


« Reply #7 on: January 15, 2009, 07:08:54 AM »
ReplyReply

How do we know if our pucks are optimized for Wide Gamut?

 I am running a Monaco Optix XR.

Michael
Logged
digitaldog
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 9004



WWW
« Reply #8 on: January 15, 2009, 08:49:30 AM »
ReplyReply

Quote from: mbalensiefer
I am running a Monaco Optix XR.

Its expecting an sRGB like gamut display.
Logged

Andrew Rodney
Author “Color Management for Photographers”
http://digitaldog.net/
Hermie
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 207


« Reply #9 on: January 15, 2009, 01:48:22 PM »
ReplyReply

Quote from: digitaldog
Its expecting an sRGB like gamut display.

The DTP94 is still supplied with Quato's high-end wide gamut displays, but their software includes correction matrices to tune the device to their wide gamut displays. EIZO uses the same approach in their Color Navigator software.

So although the device stems from the CRT era and is optimized for sRGB like displays, its color filters are seemingly potentially 'wider' than just sRGB.
« Last Edit: January 15, 2009, 01:54:13 PM by Hermie » Logged
mbalensiefer
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 297


« Reply #10 on: January 16, 2009, 06:33:34 AM »
ReplyReply

Quote
Quote
QUOTE (mbalensiefer @ Jan 15 2009, 06:08 AM)
I am running a Monaco Optix XR.


Its expecting an sRGB like gamut display.

So I should get NEC's whole Pro Kit, then.
Logged
digitaldog
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 9004



WWW
« Reply #11 on: January 16, 2009, 08:32:26 AM »
ReplyReply

Quote from: mbalensiefer
Its expecting an sRGB like gamut display.

So I should get NEC's whole Pro Kit, then.

I've had very good results using existing Colorimeters including the EyeOne Display-2 and OPTIX. I'd stick with it unless, depending on your target white point calibration, you don't get acceptable results. Yes, a mated colorimeter is preferred and ideal, but NEC and other wide gamut displays have been using the older colorimeter products for some time and with user satisfaction.

IF you find the kits price point within your budget, go for it. You only get the kit deal once if I'm not mistaken. Otherwise, the software alone is something like $99.
Logged

Andrew Rodney
Author “Color Management for Photographers”
http://digitaldog.net/
Anthony R
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 252


« Reply #12 on: January 16, 2009, 09:09:50 AM »
ReplyReply

I'd like to hear more about the backlight bleed issue if someone cares to comment. Is it only showing in the 30", or the 26 as well? TIA
Logged
walter.sk
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1328


« Reply #13 on: January 16, 2009, 09:49:02 AM »
ReplyReply

Quote from: Anthony R
I'd like to hear more about the backlight bleed issue if someone cares to comment. Is it only showing in the 30", or the 26 as well? TIA

While my computer is booting up, the lower left corner of my NEC3090 shows an area that is somewhat brighter than the rest of the screen.  However, by the time the SpectraViewII software has checked for changes in calibration or settings, the screen is uniform, top to bottom and left to right.  I use the setting that controls uniformity of color at the midpoint, as moving it higher is not needed.
Logged
pixie
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 9


« Reply #14 on: January 16, 2009, 11:09:08 AM »
ReplyReply

Quote from: Anthony R
I'd like to hear more about the backlight bleed issue if someone cares to comment. Is it only showing in the 30", or the 26 as well? TIA

On black screen I have a considerable amount of bleed present. In both lower corners and more significantly at the top center of the screen where it looks like two spotlights shining down. Once the desktop loads it's not particularly apparent. However, I can see how if working with black/white photography - particularly if those areas are supposed to be dark this could quickly become an issue - a distraction at the very least. I've been debating if this is an issue I'm just supposed to live with given the nature of flat panel monitors of this size or if it in fact merits repair/replacement under warranty. Have been trying to gauge on the net if this is considered 'within spec' but so far I'm still sitting on the fence. Regardless I was less than impressed when I got the monitor when I saw the bleed - given it's price point isn't exactly bargain basement pricing.
Logged
Anthony R
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 252


« Reply #15 on: January 16, 2009, 11:37:24 AM »
ReplyReply

Quote from: pixie
On black screen I have a considerable amount of bleed present. In both lower corners and more significantly at the top center of the screen where it looks like two spotlights shining down. Once the desktop loads it's not particularly apparent. However, I can see how if working with black/white photography - particularly if those areas are supposed to be dark this could quickly become an issue - a distraction at the very least. I've been debating if this is an issue I'm just supposed to live with given the nature of flat panel monitors of this size or if it in fact merits repair/replacement under warranty. Have been trying to gauge on the net if this is considered 'within spec' but so far I'm still sitting on the fence. Regardless I was less than impressed when I got the monitor when I saw the bleed - given it's price point isn't exactly bargain basement pricing.

If I were you, I would send it back. A monitor of that purported quality should not have backlight bleed, it's why you buy a monitor such as this. Otherwise, you might have just gotten an Apple Cinema display (shudder).

I've been using an Eizo CG210 for years. I wish their 30 was closer to more affordable.
Logged
Czornyj
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1399



WWW
« Reply #16 on: January 16, 2009, 12:23:45 PM »
ReplyReply

Quote from: Anthony R
I've been using an Eizo CG210 for years. I wish their 30 was closer to more affordable.

You could be disappointed. Contrarty to CG210 (Hitachi S-IPS panel) CG301 is equipped with S-PVA panel (not so perfect when viewed at an angle).
Logged

walter.sk
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1328


« Reply #17 on: January 16, 2009, 03:02:27 PM »
ReplyReply

Quote from: pixie
On black screen I have a considerable amount of bleed present. In both lower corners and more significantly at the top center of the screen where it looks like two spotlights shining down. Once the desktop loads it's not particularly apparent. However, I can see how if working with black/white photography - particularly if those areas are supposed to be dark this could quickly become an issue - a distraction at the very least. I've been debating if this is an issue I'm just supposed to live with given the nature of flat panel monitors of this size or if it in fact merits repair/replacement under warranty. Have been trying to gauge on the net if this is considered 'within spec' but so far I'm still sitting on the fence. Regardless I was less than impressed when I got the monitor when I saw the bleed - given it's price point isn't exactly bargain basement pricing.
I worried about it, too.  However, with black, gray or white full screen images I have not been able to detect any bleed through.  As I said, though, I use the option of making the illumination even (I don't remember just what name it goes by.)  

Try your monitor with a full screen black file, and then with gray, then white.  You will quickly see if you have a problem.
Logged
Pages: [1]   Top of Page
Print
Jump to:  

Ad
Ad
Ad