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Author Topic: LCD2690WUXi ~ versus ~ LCD2690WUXi2  (Read 15945 times)
JohnKoerner
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« on: January 24, 2009, 09:34:59 PM »
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Also, where can you get the LCD2690WUXi2?

Most places are sold out, but I am looking at a place that has one for $1,174. That is less than B&H has the previous version for, so I am a bit leery of such a low price.

Has anyone recently purchased the LCD2690WUXi2, and (if so) where did you get it from?

Have you noticed any significant improvement over the previous version?

Thanks for any feedback,

Jack
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JohnKoerner
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« Reply #1 on: January 25, 2009, 04:07:56 PM »
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Quote from: John Schweikert
Your price is probably from Provantage and yes they are reliable.
Personally I would wait until the SV kit version is in stock for the wuxi2.


Yes, as a matter of fact, it was Provantage ... glad to hear they're reliable

I found the wuxi2 at B&H, with the SV kit, for $1495. They claim it's not in stock, but they'll take your money now and ship it in 2 weeks. I was also mistaken on Provantage: Yes they has the wuxi2 for $1,174 but at that price it was not with the SpectraVision.

B&H's price was with ...
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JohnKoerner
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« Reply #2 on: January 30, 2009, 04:45:58 PM »
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Just an update: B&H is now accepting orders on the NEC LCD2690WUXi2-BK-SV.

They do not have it in stock, but they say it will be there within a week.

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/5999...w_SOFTWARE.html

B&H is offering the new monitor, plus the new Spectra VII software, for only $ 1,389.95

I just ordered mine

Jack
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JohnKoerner
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« Reply #3 on: February 13, 2009, 10:02:20 PM »
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I received my LCD2690WUXi2 today  


But for some reason, I can't get my computer to recognize it  

It works and looks wonderful, but when I try to install the Spectra VII software it says "unable to locate compatible monitor" ...

When I look in the Device Manager it just says "Standard Monitor"  

I have tried to load the drivers and install new hardwars, but can't seem to get it done  

Jack


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walter.sk
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« Reply #4 on: February 13, 2009, 10:33:13 PM »
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Quote from: JohnKoerner
I received my LCD2690WUXi2 today  


But for some reason, I can't get my computer to recognize it  

It works and looks wonderful, but when I try to install the Spectra VII software it says "unable to locate compatible monitor" ...

When I look in the Device Manager it just says "Standard Monitor"  

I have tried to load the drivers and install new hardwars, but can't seem to get it done
I had strange problems when I first got the NEC 3090 and the SpectraViewII software.  I solved it by doing two things:  I uninstalled my other monitor profiling sofrtware, and I installed the latest video driver (nVidia, in my case.)
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prairiemaiden
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« Reply #5 on: February 13, 2009, 10:40:56 PM »
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Hi Jack!
Had the same troubles with my monitor.  1st thing are you on a mac?  There is a warning on the Nec site.  I am windows xp sp3.  First thing I did was download new Microsoft WHQL digitally signed drivers from the Nec site. My computer then recognized my monitor in display properties.
http://www.necdisplay.com/SupportCenter/DriverFinder/
Then I downloaded the spectraview II software.  Please note the warnings on this page re: mac and some video cards.  I also checked to make sure I was using current driver for Video card.
http://www.necdisplay.com/SupportCenter/Mo...s/spectraview2/
After upgrading Spectraview changed preference to autodetect......closed it and restarted and it recognized my monitor.
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JohnKoerner
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« Reply #6 on: February 13, 2009, 11:17:45 PM »
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Quote from: prairiemaiden
Hi Jack!
Had the same troubles with my monitor.  1st thing are you on a mac?  There is a warning on the Nec site.  I am windows xp sp3.  First thing I did was download new Microsoft WHQL digitally signed drivers from the Nec site. My computer then recognized my monitor in display properties.
http://www.necdisplay.com/SupportCenter/DriverFinder/
Then I downloaded the spectraview II software.  Please note the warnings on this page re: mac and some video cards.  I also checked to make sure I was using current driver for Video card.
http://www.necdisplay.com/SupportCenter/Mo...s/spectraview2/
After upgrading Spectraview changed preference to autodetect......closed it and restarted and it recognized my monitor.


No I am on a PC using Vista Home Premium, SP1.

Thank you so much for the links and the advice. I will try all of that and report back
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JohnKoerner
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« Reply #7 on: February 13, 2009, 11:27:51 PM »
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Quote from: walter.sk
I had strange problems when I first got the NEC 3090 and the SpectraViewII software.  I solved it by doing two things:  I uninstalled my other monitor profiling sofrtware, and I installed the latest video driver (nVidia, in my case.)

Thank you too Walter. It sounds like I am going to have to follow a similar path as both of you, and I appreciate your help.
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JohnKoerner
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« Reply #8 on: February 14, 2009, 01:06:58 PM »
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Well, I was up till 3am, but I got her done  

What I thought was kinda funny (and pretty timely) was my Windows "update" sequence came up, and lo-and-behold! ... one the new "optional" drivers was for none other than the LCD2690WUXi2  ... now that's what I call service

Funny thing was, the SpectraView disc still didn't recognize the monitor, even though my computer now recognized it.

So I downloaded the newest version of the software, thanks to the link you provided PrairieMaiden, and it installed perfectly, and my new monitor is now officially calibrated  

So thanks again to you both for the tips!

Jack



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Evanford
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« Reply #9 on: September 21, 2009, 10:12:08 AM »
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Thank you all for this thread.  I was struggling with getting my spectraview software on windows XP to recognize my LCD2490WUXi2.  I also updated my video graphics card driver but I do not think that fixed anything.   It was only after I downloaded Spectraview 1.1.0.3 that it would recognize the monitor during installation.  What a hassle.  Just thought I would pass that on in case anyone else was having this issue.
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LA30
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« Reply #10 on: September 21, 2009, 01:16:17 PM »
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Quote from: Evanford
Thank you all for this thread.  I was struggling with getting my spectraview software on windows XP to recognize my LCD2490WUXi2.  I also updated my video graphics card driver but I do not think that fixed anything.   It was only after I downloaded Spectraview 1.1.0.3 that it would recognize the monitor during installation.  What a hassle.  Just thought I would pass that on in case anyone else was having this issue.


Who knows how long the enclosed CD with software has been sitting on the shelves.  It is always a good rule to take a look at the manufactures website for latest software.  Glad it is working for you.

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shewhorn
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« Reply #11 on: December 21, 2009, 12:50:51 PM »
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Quote from: kenscott30
Who knows how long the enclosed CD with software has been sitting on the shelves.  It is always a good rule to take a look at the manufactures website for latest software.  Glad it is working for you.

I just spoke with NEC. The differences between the 2690 and the 2690i2 are minimal, it doesn't really matter which version you have with regards to performance (at least according to NEC). They had to source certain parts from a different manufacturer and as a result they are required to change the product name. The TFT panel is exactly the same. The analog board (power supply) and video board are different. I would speculate that they are merely having the boards manufactured by a different supplier now and that the parts are probably identical although they didn't go into that much detail.

Cheers, Joe
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Plekto
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« Reply #12 on: December 22, 2009, 02:27:40 AM »
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NEC LCD2690WUXi2 (widescreen) - (LG.Philips LM260WU2) panel.

This might save you some money if you can find this or a similar LG panel in a Viewsonic or similar smaller brand.
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shewhorn
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« Reply #13 on: December 25, 2009, 08:16:49 PM »
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Quote from: Plekto
NEC LCD2690WUXi2 (widescreen) - (LG.Philips LM260WU2) panel.

This might save you some money if you can find this or a similar LG panel in a Viewsonic or similar smaller brand.

It might save you money but you will most likely not get the same quality. Just because a given model uses the same panel does not mean it will perform to the same specifications. Aside from NEC, LaCie, Eizo, and certain Samsung models I'm not aware of any other manufacturers that are using 12 bit LUTs in their processing electronics. Also the backlight will make a difference as well and other features such as NEC's luminance uniformity.

Some more info on the 2690WUXi vs. 2690WUXi2... the version 2 does NOT have the A-TW polarizer (source... the horse's mouth... http://www.necdisplay.com/supportcenter/mo...ectraview2/faq/  (search on polarizer) ).

Cheers, Joe
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jerryrock
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« Reply #14 on: December 25, 2009, 09:30:56 PM »
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Quote from: shewhorn
I'm not aware of any other manufacturers that are using 12 bit LUTs in their processing electronics.
Cheers, Joe

My HP DreamColor monitor (LP2480ZX) uses a true 10 bit IPS Panel (LG) and an updatable 12-bit pre-LUT, 3x3 matrix, and post-LUT for maximum flexibility.
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Gerald J Skrocki
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« Reply #15 on: December 25, 2009, 10:49:24 PM »
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Quote from: jerryrock
My HP DreamColor monitor (LP2480ZX) uses a true 10 bit IPS Panel (LG) and an updatable 12-bit pre-LUT, 3x3 matrix, and post-LUT for maximum flexibility.

Good to know. I'm not too familiar with the Dream Color but just had a look. I wish HP would develop a pro grade 30" like your monitor although (although perhaps with not as wide of a gamut... I work in Adobe RGB and it appears that the Dream Color is capable of going far beyond that), I do have an LP3065 and for a consumer panel it's really quite good. I just took deliver of an NEC 2690 on Thursday and after putting it up side by side with the NEC it really holds its own (especially with regards to black levels, the NEC by comparison has a slight bluish cast to the blacks where as the HP is black black (lower luminance as well at the minimum black level although I suppose that's less important than being able to distinguish between levels)).

Cheers, Joe
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Plekto
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« Reply #16 on: December 26, 2009, 02:35:41 AM »
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Eizo and a couple of other brands *may* have better options and setup, but I can guarantee that everyone else is just a matter of a few basic differences.  Samsung, NEC, Sony, Viewsonic, HP - they're all the same, pretty much, or close enough that you'd need a pro to tell the difference.  So shop for the panel and features instead of having any attachment to a specific brand.
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shewhorn
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« Reply #17 on: December 26, 2009, 04:24:18 AM »
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Quote from: Plekto
Eizo and a couple of other brands *may* have better options and setup, but I can guarantee that everyone else is just a matter of a few basic differences.  Samsung, NEC, Sony, Viewsonic, HP - they're all the same, pretty much, or close enough that you'd need a pro to tell the difference.

I beg to differ and it all has to do with context. This forum has an interesting mix of professionals and extremely talented enthusiasts (who can often easily outshoot a lot of pros) and that requires two very different approaches with regards to advice and what is or is not worth buying. I own a Dell 20" (about 4 or 5 years old now... haven't used it in several years aside from the odd non-photo edited application here and there... I never used it for critical editing but I have compared it to my better monitors), and HP LP3065, a Samsung 213T, and an NEC2690. The Dell is the worst of the bunch. The Samsung was nice for its time but much better options have come along since then, specifically it misrepresents reds (they're a bit orange) and it can't be profiled out. The HP is impressive for a consumer model. When I bought it the options were the Apple 30" ACD, the 30" Dell and of course the HP. The HP at the time was the best performing display (if I were to buy right now it would be an NEC 3090).

For professional applications "a few basic differences" can mean the difference between smooth sailing and hours of lost time. For example, if you're producing a print and it contains a smooth gradient like what you would see in a scene with the sky slightly after sunset, a less expensive monitor (of which many tend to have luminance issues... they are too bright and require hacks to work around) in order to bring it down to acceptable luminance levels will require a destructive change to the profile loaded to the video LUT which is only 8 bits. Most of the time 8 bits works for us but with critical applications (especially if you're working in a wider gamut color space) there is very little margin for error. A display that has to be coaxed down to the proper luminance level via the video LUT may display posterization. When you're charging hundreds of dollars for a print you don't want to deliver something with posterization in it so you might start chasing a ghost in Photoshop that may not be there to begin with in the first place. You might find this out when you run a print which is not such a big deal if you own a large format printer but if you don't it's a slow process if you can't rely on your monitor for accurate soft proofing.

For a pro I always say that your monitor is your most used piece of gear in your studio. You're ammortizing its cost over a period of 3 to 4 years and you're doing to stare at the thing for anywhere from 40 to 70 hours per week all year. It makes sense to get the highest quality monitor you can afford. Yes you might save $500 by going with a less expensive model but it only takes one picky or unhappy customer or problem with the lab output and that imagined savings instantly goes away in the form of wasted time trying to trouble shoot problems.

Now for an enthusiast I would say it's more a matter of budget and priority. You could go with something like an NEC P221W or an HP LP2475 and get yourself a very nice display and that will probably serve you quite well. Spending more is met with the rule of diminishing returns and if you don't place a really heavy demand on your monitor (it's not a tool you use every day to make a living with, at least not for making color and density judgments... spreadsheets don't require anything fancy) and the occasional inaccuracy and the time required to fix the problem isn't a big deal then I'd have a hard time recommending that such a user spend twice the amount of money on a more accurate model.

Now to be fair, I know a ton of pros who don't have high end screens and for the most part they do fine but what I often see is that at some point in say, a 3 year period they will run into an issue where the output they get from the lab doesn't match what they see on their screen and when that happens the amount of time you have to put into trouble shooting pretty much negates any money you may have saved. In a professional environment everyone has to consider the ROI of everything they purchase and weigh the risks if they decide to make a compromise and go for something a little less expensive. We all have different needs, I just think it's silly though to skimp on a monitor and maybe try to save $500 when you spend tens of thousands of dollars on top quality glass and camera bodies... what's the point of buying expensive glass and camera bodies if you don't have a tool capable of displaying the nuances that these other tools are capable of capturing? Well... that's my opinion on the subject at least.

Quote
So shop for the panel and features instead of having any attachment to a specific brand.

This I agree with 100% Eizo can produce some real clunkers as does NEC. A brand name doesn't necessarily mean guaranteed quality or accuracy. Case in point... lots of people think Bose speakers produce high quality sound but if people were in a blind listening test comparing Bose products to other products of similar cost without knowing what they were listening to NOBODY would ever come to the conclusion that Bose speakers sounded good at all. Bose - Better sound through marketing! :-) And what about Dell? Dell has a terrible reputation when it comes to monitors but what if one day they produce a real winner? It would be silly to dismiss a good product if it can deliver the goods just because historically the results have been poor.

Cheers, Joe
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jerryrock
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« Reply #18 on: December 26, 2009, 09:46:42 AM »
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It should be important for anyone who subscribes to this forum to maintain a calibrated workflow. We invest thousands of dollars on cameras, lenses, lighting and software and most want to find a bargain monitor. There are a lot of brand specific fanboys out there, but a monitor is a personal choice and should have a feature set that best suits the individual. For me it was important to find a monitor that could easily switch between calibrated color gamuts and the HP DreamColor is the only monitor that I am aware of that can accomplish this task with the push of a button. The internal LUT can maintain seven separate color space calibrations, allowing you to switch from Full Gamut or Adobe RGB to sRGB for web viewing so you don't get the super saturated effect prevalent in most wide gamut monitors. While others monitors may allow you switch color spaces, they won't be calibrated spaces until you do another full calibration.

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Gerald J Skrocki
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« Reply #19 on: December 26, 2009, 10:29:06 AM »
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Quote from: jerryrock
While others monitors may allow you switch color spaces, they won't be calibrated spaces until you do another full calibration.

Can you elaborate on this more? While the NECs can only store one Monitor LUT at a time you can, via Spectraview simply select a different target and it will automatically upload a new monitor LUT to the screen. I'm not sure how the end result is any different than what the HP is doing (aside from the fact that the NEC is storing different calibrations on your computer and not in the monitor).

Now, one thing I'm not sure of is if the NEC clamps down on the gamut for those lower gamut color spaces. The SpectraView software does ship with an sRGB target but I'm not sure if that merely means it's setup for D65, Gamma 2.2 or if it prevents the display from rendering colors out of the sRGB gamut to render... I'm curious now though and it's easy enough to test.

How do the HP do at rendering lower gamut color spaces? I bought the 2690 with the intent of using it in Adobe RGB. I've heard a few comments that the sRGB emulation isn't all that great.

Cheers, Joe
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