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Author Topic: Blue Iceberg  (Read 10271 times)
DarkPenguin
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« Reply #20 on: January 30, 2009, 07:44:52 AM »
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Quote from: mahleu
What colour would a cold Smurf go?

"The reason Smurfs are blue is that they are choking to death." - Johny Carson.
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francois
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« Reply #21 on: January 30, 2009, 08:00:22 AM »
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Quote from: mahleu
What colour would a cold Smurf go?
Purple!
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Francois
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« Reply #22 on: January 30, 2009, 12:21:25 PM »
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I think the scientific explanation is rather dull, and only useful, creatively speaking, to nerdlinger trainspotters and such that really get excited by such information.
They are blue because they are lonely,sad and dying.

Oh...and the universe is composed of emotions and ideas btw NOT lifeless matter as some scientists might have you believe. They really need to get laid some time...sheesh.
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DarkPenguin
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« Reply #23 on: January 30, 2009, 01:49:55 PM »
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Well, there you go.
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Rob C
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« Reply #24 on: January 30, 2009, 01:57:49 PM »
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Quote from: francois
Purple!


No way, no room: Flying Purple People Eater already has copyright.

Rob C
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Rob C
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« Reply #25 on: January 30, 2009, 02:04:52 PM »
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[ They really need to get laid some time...sheesh.
[/quote]


The First Theorem:

If all the scientists in the world were laid, head to tail, they would make a line that stretched from here to there.

The Second Theorem:

If all the scientists in the world were laid in a circle, they would form the biggest daisy chain ever.

Rob C
« Last Edit: January 30, 2009, 02:05:39 PM by Rob C » Logged

DaveCurtis
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« Reply #26 on: January 30, 2009, 02:51:52 PM »
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Quote from: seany
The self satisfaction Mark Dubovoy conveys in his article on the colour of icebergs is hard to knock, the problem is it lets people of a non scientific bent [myself] even more confused than they may have been before reading his article.This I believe is the common failing of most scientists when trying to explain their theories to the general public, they have not learned that less is more or that if they can't condense their explanations to one short sentence it will only serve to confuse.

This is not meant in a nasty sense just an opinion of one of a non scientific persuasion, my loss.

I still think life is more interesting when you can understand some of the basics of nature - why the sky is blue and why sunsets are red and of course icebergs !  

Here is a simple dumbed down explaination ( the way I tend to remember it):

"White light is made up of all the colors of the rainbow (red, blue, violet, etc.) and each color has a different wavelength.

Icebergs are white because the ice is full of tiny air bubbles. The bubble surfaces scatter all color wavelengths by the same amount, giving the iceberg an overall white appearance. (Water and ice in clouds scatter color wavelengths the same way, and they also appear white.)

Ice that is bubble free has a blue tint which is due to the same light phenomenon that tints the sky - the wavelength of blue light causes it to be scattered or spread around much more than the other colors, and this scattered blue light is what makes the sky (and bubble free ice) blue"

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JDClements
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« Reply #27 on: January 30, 2009, 04:39:07 PM »
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Quote from: DarkPenguin
"The reason Smurfs are blue is that they are choking to death." - Johny Carson.

Ever notice that there is only one girl Smurf? That's the real reason they're all blue.
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MatthewCromer
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« Reply #28 on: January 30, 2009, 06:43:59 PM »
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Yes I'm definitely enjoying the blue iceberg image too.  One of these days, I'm definitely going to Antarctica to do some photography!
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DaveCurtis
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« Reply #29 on: January 30, 2009, 07:32:47 PM »
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Quote from: MatthewCromer
Yes I'm definitely enjoying the blue iceberg image too.  One of these days, I'm definitely going to Antarctica to do some photography!


Yes, I've have been thinking along the same lines for several years now as there are trips that leave from here in NZ however when I get sea sick here in the local habour I dread to think what I would be like down in the Southern Ocean in 30ft swells.

Dave
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Ray
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« Reply #30 on: January 30, 2009, 07:40:51 PM »
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Quote from: DaveDn
Ice that is bubble free has a blue tint which is due to the same light phenomenon that tints the sky - the wavelength of blue light causes it to be scattered or spread around much more than the other colors, and this scattered blue light is what makes the sky (and bubble free ice) blue"

Isn't this one of the myths that mark Dobovoy dismissed in his article? I quote, myth #4.

Quote
4.Glaciers are blue because of light scattering, the same phenomena that make the sky blue. Wrong again. Without going into a full explanation, the sky looks blue because of an effect called Rayleigh Scattering. Raleigh scattering is produced by Electron-Photon interactions in the gases in the upper atmosphere where there is little or no Oxygen left. This is completely different from anything that happens with liquid water at sea level.

I understand from Mark's explanation that the principal cause of water or ice appearing blue is due to water molecules being able to 'absorb' more readily the longer frequencies of light towards the red end of the spectrum, and less able to absorb the shorter frequency, higher energy, blue wavelengths.

To quote again from his article:

Quote
It is a well known fact that lower frequency Photons have precisely the right amount of energy to excite the vibrational modes of the water molecule. Thus, as white light travels through water, the red/orange/yellow components of light get absorbed by the water and cause the water molecules to vibrate, while high frequency (blue) photons continue to travel through the water. The net result is a slight increase in the water temperature (molecular vibrations translate directly into temperature), and the white light turning blue as it travels deep into the water.
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Brammers
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« Reply #31 on: January 30, 2009, 11:44:50 PM »
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It's a lovely shot, but I can't draw my eye away from the huge dust bunny to the mid-left!

If it's not a dust-bunny then I'm of the opinion it should go anyway - it looks enough like a dust-bunny to annoy the hell out of me.

Antarctica looks a spellbinding place - I have to get myself down there while it's still like that.
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David Anderson
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« Reply #32 on: January 31, 2009, 01:16:30 AM »
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Quote from: Brammers
the huge dust bunny to the mid-left!

Move away from the screen !  
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Brammers
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« Reply #33 on: January 31, 2009, 03:21:31 AM »
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Quote from: David Anderson
Move away from the screen !  

You're right, I should - it might bite!!!  
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michael
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« Reply #34 on: January 31, 2009, 07:02:13 AM »
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The bunny (or maybe it's a smurf) was not noticed when the file was prepared for the screen, days before I actually made a print. It has now been relegated to the trash heap of history, but I'm too lazy to update the online file right now.

Michael
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pegelli
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« Reply #35 on: January 31, 2009, 07:59:03 AM »
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Quote from: michael
It has now been relegated to the trash heap of history
I hope you mean the print and not the file. I's a stunning image and good PP should be able to chase the bunny back in it's hole  

Btw, I like all 3 pictures you have posted sofar. Can't wait to see more (and dream that one day I might...........)
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pieter, aka pegelli
Willard
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« Reply #36 on: January 31, 2009, 01:25:59 PM »
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The first thing that popped into my head when I saw Michael's photo was this photo
[a href=\'index.php?act=findpost&pid=0\']http://www.shackleton-endurance.com/cgi-bin/store/commerce.cgi?cart_id=1233427120.417&product=Other_Antarctic_Photographs&pid=38[/a]

That took some Googling since I didn't know the photographer, expedition, or title.
Now that I look at them the similarities are only faint, strange how the brain works.

The second thing that popped in my head was "That's one of his better shots!"
Hmmm...I better back pedal a little, that wasn't meant to denigrate your other shots.

Thanks for sharing.
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Willard
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« Reply #37 on: January 31, 2009, 01:27:31 PM »
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Dang it.  I don't post enough to know how to make a link work.
Just copy this.
http://www.shackleton-endurance.com/cgi-bi...aphs&pid=38
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seany
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« Reply #38 on: February 01, 2009, 05:23:05 AM »
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Quote from: DaveDn
I still think life is more interesting when you can understand some of the basics of nature - why the sky is blue and why sunsets are red and of course icebergs !  

Here is a simple dumbed down explaination ( the way I tend to remember it):

"White light is made up of all the colors of the rainbow (red, blue, violet, etc.) and each color has a different wavelength.

Icebergs are white because the ice is full of tiny air bubbles. The bubble surfaces scatter all color wavelengths by the same amount, giving the iceberg an overall white appearance. (Water and ice in clouds scatter color wavelengths the same way, and they also appear white.)

Ice that is bubble free has a blue tint which is due to the same light phenomenon that tints the sky - the wavelength of blue light causes it to be scattered or spread around much more than the other colors, and this scattered blue light is what makes the sky (and bubble free ice) blue"
I thank you sir on my own behalf and on behalf of those too timid to voice their lack of insight in these things or fearful of incurring the displeasure of He who must be obeyed!!!
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sojournerphoto
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« Reply #39 on: February 01, 2009, 11:20:53 AM »
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Quote from: Ray
Having just read the article, I got the impression that the fundamental reason for icebergs being blue was the tendency for lightwaves of a lower frequency than blue (green to red) to excite the vibrational modes of water molecules, thus transforming their energy into a small amount of heat, which results in a shift in the balance of white light towards the blue end of the spectrum.


Yep, that's what makes water blue. When white light is transmitted through it the red and green parts of the spectrum are selectively filtered out leaving blue.

This isn't the same as the scattering that makes the sky blue where the blue is scattered and the red transmitted to greater degrees. Looking at the sky the deepest blue is furthest from the sun.

Mike
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