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Author Topic: Snowdrop  (Read 1782 times)
Dave Hall
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« on: January 31, 2009, 03:51:49 PM »
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First of the season.
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pegelli
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« Reply #1 on: January 31, 2009, 04:04:09 PM »
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I've been trying to get out and make shots like that, but I chickened out and stayed in bed.

I like how you've put the snow drop off-center and slightly diagonal.
On the other hand I find the slightly oof background distracting. There's two options you might have tried: stop down further and have it all sharp or open up and blur it more.

Maybe I'll get up early tomorrow  
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pieter, aka pegelli
John R
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« Reply #2 on: January 31, 2009, 05:03:48 PM »
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Try to have better visual balance and design in your image. For example, if you are going to include large areas of black, they have to be balanced against the rest of the elements in the image. Although shallow depth of field will help somewhat, black, or for that matter any dark areas, will still draw attention and compete with the rest of the elements. If you can't use shallow DOF, try to avoid dark areas. Learning is a matter of time and practice and critical review on your part, and of course, critique from peers can be helpful. When you have learned something it will likely be unconcious, but it will be incoporated in your photography. So don't worry about trying to remember everything.

John R.
« Last Edit: February 01, 2009, 07:09:44 PM by John R » Logged
LoisWakeman
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« Reply #3 on: February 02, 2009, 09:38:59 AM »
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Dave: as flowers are generally pretty co-operative subjects, you have plenty of time to consider different framings and angles. I don't like to sound as if I am a know-it-all as I am still learning myself, every day, but this does look a bit as if you spotted the flower, got in close and snapped immediately.

As your focus is the bloom, then spending a moment to remove the dead leaves and twigs to simplify the background would be a good idea, and then looking for a framing to maximise its impact in the shot. For example, you could crop the bottom 2-3 cms here to advantage.

As it is, there is a bit too much 'clutter' here to allow the eye to rest on the snowdrop. The problem is that our eyes (or rather our brains) are good at ignoring things we aren't interested in, whereas the camera records it all impartially. Try to get into the habit of consciously looking all around the frame looking for distractions and possible problems before you click the shutter button. It will eventually become second nature - then if people say "why on earth did you include X or Y in that?", you can at least tell them you did it deliberately!  
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Dave Hall
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« Reply #4 on: February 02, 2009, 09:52:49 AM »
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Quote from: LoisWakeman
Dave: as flowers are generally pretty co-operative subjects, you have plenty of time to consider different framings and angles. I don't like to sound as if I am a know-it-all as I am still learning myself, every day, but this does look a bit as if you spotted the flower, got in close and snapped immediately.

As your focus is the bloom, then spending a moment to remove the dead leaves and twigs to simplify the background would be a good idea, and then looking for a framing to maximise its impact in the shot. For example, you could crop the bottom 2-3 cms here to advantage.

As it is, there is a bit too much 'clutter' here to allow the eye to rest on the snowdrop. The problem is that our eyes (or rather our brains) are good at ignoring things we aren't interested in, whereas the camera records it all impartially. Try to get into the habit of consciously looking all around the frame looking for distractions and possible problems before you click the shutter button. It will eventually become second nature - then if people say "why on earth did you include X or Y in that?", you can at least tell them you did it deliberately!  

Hi Lois.
I did do a little tidying before I took the shot, I left the dead leaves in because they are frosty. The flower is still around, probably under 150mm of snow but I may try again with it.

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Fank Cheh
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« Reply #5 on: February 02, 2009, 09:37:53 PM »
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Suggestion OBTW my first post but what would happen if you cropped just the snow drop and dead leaf/vertical frame, that removes all of the green distraction--- works for me.
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