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Author Topic: Definition of landscape  (Read 6289 times)
Jack Flesher
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« on: December 22, 2004, 08:27:55 AM »
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Well I think it depends on how anal you are about definitions...  Actually, this is probably a good subject for Michael -- similar to snapshot/postcard/fine-art...  And to be sure, there is a lot of room for cross-overs  

IMO only and would like to hear other opinions:

Landscape implies features of nature in a broad spectrum, but can include cityscapes, seascapes, sunsets, single trees, boats in a harbor, folks enjoying the outdoors or groups of anmals in their outdoor habitat.  

OTOH, nature implies closer-up shots of trees, plants and animals, including macros of our natural environment.  Of course there is pure macro too, which I guess would be anything shot close up...

My .02 only, and ultimately I'm not sure it matters  

Jack
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howard smith
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« Reply #1 on: December 22, 2004, 12:38:23 PM »
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"What do you shoot?"

"A Canon 1ds."

"No, not your camera.  What kind of photography do you do?"

"I'm a fine art landscape photographer."

"What is art?"

"I don't know."

"What makes art fine art?"

"I don't know."

"Well, what is a lanscape?"

"I don't know that either."

"Then how do you know you are a fine art landscape photographer?"

"I said so."

"Oh!  Then I guess I am a master fine art photographer."
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Jack Flesher
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« Reply #2 on: December 22, 2004, 02:06:02 PM »
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Howard:

Perfect!  



Jack
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russell a
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« Reply #3 on: January 09, 2005, 01:15:34 PM »
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Is there a context in which a definition of "landscape" is important to you?  For example, if you were entering a photo for acceptance in an exhibition and the category under which you were entering is "landscape", then you might either:  a) make sure that the work you entered easily falls under that defintion, according to what you have observed concerning labeling vs. content, or  determine to enter a work that you think might stretch the common definition.  If the latter, your attitude could be: a) I'm going to stretch the defintion in hopes that it will attract the attention of a juror who shares the expansiveness of my vision, or   I'm a rebel, #### the torpedos.  Or there are other possibilities.  It's part of the situational stuff that we encounter everyday and has (IMO) little long term utility otherwise.

I recently observed a juror, who is on record as being opposed to categories in contests, who awarded first prize in a "Fall" category to the only black and white entry.  It was a good photo, but the juror was also making a statement to the consternation of all those who submitted the traditional orange and yellow leaves.  One can either think in or out of the box.  And, it's your choice.
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bobrobert
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« Reply #4 on: December 22, 2004, 05:50:33 AM »
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What is the definition of landscape in photography terms?
My dictionary states "the features of a land area as seen in broad view" The countryside is obvious but does a city come under the definition? Where are the boundrys? Does a sunset scene count?TIA
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DiaAzul
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« Reply #5 on: December 22, 2004, 11:13:43 AM »
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IMHO I prefer to describe photography by the action or process rather than the end result. So, in the case of landscape photography I would tend to a definition along the lines of 'a study/appreciation of the (natural) planet through the medium of photographic images'. This keeps the definition fairly broad and loose but indicates the central tenet for me which is to provide images which give a unique and interesting perspective on subjects which people may just walk past. I put 'natural' in brackets as some may wish to exclude human generated landscapes from their definitions if that is what cooks their bacon. In terms of actual sub categories I would talk of 'the rugged wilderness', 'Urban lightscapes', 'colourful caves', 'industrial decay', 'human impact'. In that way it helps to define not only what I would like to shoot, but gives some indication of how I might approach the subject through subject selection and photographic style.

Another reason for choosing a professional photographer is that they can take the mundane and turn it into something interesting through their skill and experience. Ultimately, this separates the snapshooter, who may get a good picture, from the professional, who must get a good picture.
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David Plummer    http://photo.tanzo.org/
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« Reply #6 on: December 22, 2004, 12:56:28 PM »
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thanks Howard,
that sums up this entire forum quite nicely...!
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Regards,
Oscar Rysdyk
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darkcastor
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« Reply #7 on: January 09, 2005, 01:06:52 AM »
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Well said, Howard.

But, honestly, let's stick with that landscape issue a bit longer - there's a few fairly broad interpretations of what a landscape supposedly is.

"Landscape implies features of nature in a broad spectrum, but can include .....cityscapes ....folks enjoying the outdoors or groups of anmals in their outdoor habitat".  Huh

Good grief !
Does a close-up of an animal's face mean that it's a "Portrait" ??
I think not.

The solution is in the dictionary: "A picture representing NATURAL inland scenery."  A SEASCAPE is something else again.

Darkcastor
Master Photographer
Landscape & Nature Photographer
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