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Author Topic: Full size portret print  (Read 5003 times)
tterhart
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« on: February 20, 2009, 06:25:46 AM »
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I must make a picture of a model (had-feet)
It will be printed on a display full size/life size)
Do you have tips for camera (pixel), lens, light etc
It will be in a studio.

Thanks in advance
Regards

Thijs

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situgrrl
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« Reply #1 on: February 20, 2009, 08:56:16 AM »
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We need a bit of help; what knowledge do you have? what equipment do you have? what is the budget?  what is the quality required?  What is it for?

It's something that's pretty simple to do - "if you know how."  If you don't know how, you are likely not going to make a good job of it and would be better calling in someone who does know how - assuming that this is a commercial need.

If it is something for you - the best camera is the one you own, the best lens is the best lens you own and the best light is natural (which you don't own but is available for free any time between dawn and dusk).  Experiment lots when you are shooting but it is printing that will be the hard part - plenty of people here to help though.
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tterhart
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« Reply #2 on: February 23, 2009, 10:41:27 AM »
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Quote from: situgrrl
We need a bit of help; what knowledge do you have? what equipment do you have? what is the budget?  what is the quality required?  What is it for?

It's something that's pretty simple to do - "if you know how."  If you don't know how, you are likely not going to make a good job of it and would be better calling in someone who does know how - assuming that this is a commercial need.

If it is something for you - the best camera is the one you own, the best lens is the best lens you own and the best light is natural (which you don't own but is available for free any time between dawn and dusk).  Experiment lots when you are shooting but it is printing that will be the hard part - plenty of people here to help though.

Its for commercial need and i am not a biginner but want to know if i a nikon D3x will be fine or if i need a Hasseldlad H3D-39-II?

Thanks in davance

Regards Thijs
 

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tterhart
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« Reply #3 on: February 23, 2009, 10:45:09 AM »
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Quote from: situgrrl
We need a bit of help; what knowledge do you have? what equipment do you have? what is the budget?  what is the quality required?  What is it for?

It's something that's pretty simple to do - "if you know how."  If you don't know how, you are likely not going to make a good job of it and would be better calling in someone who does know how - assuming that this is a commercial need.

If it is something for you - the best camera is the one you own, the best lens is the best lens you own and the best light is natural (which you don't own but is available for free any time between dawn and dusk).  Experiment lots when you are shooting but it is printing that will be the hard part - plenty of people here to help though.

And enough quality for printing it on a life size display.
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dalethorn
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« Reply #4 on: February 23, 2009, 01:39:24 PM »
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Either camera is OK. For printing life-size, you'll need really strong light, and a lot of contrast. Just don't overdo it.
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tterhart
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« Reply #5 on: February 24, 2009, 08:38:37 AM »
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Quote from: dalethorn
Either camera is OK. For printing life-size, you'll need really strong light, and a lot of contrast. Just don't overdo it.

Thank you,

one question;
If i use a bowens 1000 w and a 180cm softbox will it be ok, or do i neet to flash direct without softbox.

Regards

Thijs

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dalethorn
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« Reply #6 on: February 24, 2009, 11:09:36 PM »
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Quote from: tterhart
Thank you,

one question;
If i use a bowens 1000 w and a 180cm softbox will it be ok, or do i neet to flash direct without softbox.

Regards

Thijs

If you have the accessories now, try them out on whoever you can get to stand still long enough for your experiment. Artificial lighting can be very tricky - I hardly ever get the same result twice unless I duplicate the setup exactly every time (very boring). When I say don't overdo it, I just mean don't crank up the contrast to the point you lose important detail. But *do* feel free to overdo the equipment - the more light sources you have scattered around, and ways to bounce that light, the more likely you are to find the perfect balance. If you're renting the equipment, get as much as you can afford.
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tterhart
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« Reply #7 on: February 25, 2009, 03:12:49 AM »
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Quote from: dalethorn
If you have the accessories now, try them out on whoever you can get to stand still long enough for your experiment. Artificial lighting can be very tricky - I hardly ever get the same result twice unless I duplicate the setup exactly every time (very boring). When I say don't overdo it, I just mean don't crank up the contrast to the point you lose important detail. But *do* feel free to overdo the equipment - the more light sources you have scattered around, and ways to bounce that light, the more likely you are to find the perfect balance. If you're renting the equipment, get as much as you can afford.

You have been very helpful.
Thank you so muth.

Regards,
Thijs
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terence_patrick
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« Reply #8 on: March 26, 2009, 05:43:36 PM »
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I'd say the more resolution you can get, the better. I shot a "life size" (about 64 inches tall) poster of a model for an energy drink campaign and used a Canon 1DS MKII (16mp) and felt the resolution wasn't enough, even printed at 180ppi. There was a little cropping that had to be done to the original file to fit the format of the poster and lots of compositing, thus compromised some of the file's integrity in the end.

The D3X might be enough, but if you can get the H3D, I'd go with that assuming you're comfortable shooting both cameras. If this is a commercial job, you'll probably have to leave room for type or to provide cropping options for the art director. Depending on the mock ups the AD has (if any), you should probably have enough lights to create a smooth/even tone background in case they want to crop the model out of the background all together. I'd also shoot with a longer lens like the 85mm for Nikon or the 120mm for Hasselblad with the camera on a secured tripod with a camera height near the model's belly button. That would help if you need to composite multiple parts of the frame together to make several so-so shots into one good shot.
« Last Edit: March 26, 2009, 05:44:07 PM by terence_patrick » Logged
Dick Roadnight
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« Reply #9 on: April 23, 2009, 08:40:12 AM »
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The ideal camera for this job it the Seitz 617 digital, 160 Megapixels in a panoramic format... you might be able to hire one.

I have a H3D11-50, which would be adequate.... if you are in the UK midlands, I will bring it round.

As said by others, high contrast light helps make the most of the res you have.

If you have any control over what the model will be wearing, the trick is to avoid fine textures that you cannot resolve - even APS looks sharp when resolving coarse textures.

Shift-and-stitch works well to increase res, if you have the kit, but it is difficult with a live model... but might be possible with a good pro model. (I am putting a Sinar P3 system together.)
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Hasselblad H4, Sinar P3 monorail view camera, Schneider Apo-digitar lenses
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