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Author Topic: stilll about the D3X  (Read 9512 times)
eronald
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« Reply #40 on: March 08, 2009, 02:32:01 PM »
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Quote from: petermarrek
It is with great amusement reading all these comments about and why the D3x exists, mostly written by folks who are guessing at best. As far as obsolescence is concerned, My D2x still serves admirably making money for me. The D3x is great when I need the extra resolution. An added bonus is that I can now take more chances physically with the D2x as it has become more expendable. Can't understand why more people don't snap these "outdated" cameras up, judging from the abuse I have put mine through these cameras will function well for many years to come.

I have never had a pro series camera damaged by abuse. I don't think it's physically possible for a human being to damage one without a lever effect eg. falls with an attached long lens, or foreign matter in the mirror box. I drop my N and C   cameras into an unpadded bag, they're all pro models, they go where I go and after a few years they're still working perfectly; I do need to change shutters occasionally, but that is considered normal wear and tear. Of course if I did strange things like use sealed plastic bags or rain protectors, I'm sure I would have failures ...

Edmund
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Edmund Ronald, Ph.D. 
BernardLanguillier
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« Reply #41 on: March 08, 2009, 06:01:16 PM »
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Quote from: eronald
I have never had a pro series camera damaged by abuse. I don't think it's physically possible for a human being to damage one without a lever effect eg. falls with an attached long lens, or foreign matter in the mirror box.

The weakest physical point of high resolutions DSLR, whatever the make, is the alignement of the mount and sensor axis.

Any wall involving a shock on the lens, even a short/light lens, will most probably take the mount out of perfect alignement which will result on images with an unsharp area.

Even if it appears to be still working fine, any camera having sustained a fall must be sent for repair if perfect results are still expected.

Cheers,
Bernard
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A few images online here!
Tony Beach
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« Reply #42 on: March 08, 2009, 08:56:19 PM »
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Quote from: BernardLanguillier
The weakest physical point of high resolutions DSLR, whatever the make, is the alignement of the mount and sensor axis.

Any wall involving a shock on the lens, even a short/light lens, will most probably take the mount out of perfect alignement which will result on images with an unsharp area.

Even if it appears to be still working fine, any camera having sustained a fall must be sent for repair if perfect results are still expected.

Cheers,
Bernard

Well I would agree that the camera should be checked, my D300 has been banged around pretty good and on its last inspection by Nikon had no issues with the lens mount.
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eronald
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« Reply #43 on: March 08, 2009, 08:57:54 PM »
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Quote from: BernardLanguillier
The weakest physical point of high resolutions DSLR, whatever the make, is the alignement of the mount and sensor axis.

Any wall involving a shock on the lens, even a short/light lens, will most probably take the mount out of perfect alignement which will result on images with an unsharp area.

Even if it appears to be still working fine, any camera having sustained a fall must be sent for repair if perfect results are still expected.

Cheers,
Bernard

Yes. which is why I tend to mount a 50/1.8 quasi pancake lenscap, or a 20 on mine while travelling


Edmund
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BernardLanguillier
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« Reply #44 on: March 08, 2009, 10:15:13 PM »
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Quote from: eronald
Yes. which is why I tend to mount a 50/1.8 quasi pancake lenscap, or a 20 on mine while travelling

Probably a smart approach indeed.

Cheers,
Bernard
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A few images online here!
eronald
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« Reply #45 on: March 09, 2009, 06:04:22 AM »
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Quote from: BernardLanguillier
Probably a smart approach indeed.

Cheers,
Bernard

Actually, I would be more worried about internal misaligments (sensor, mirror, focus sensor) from sustained transport vibration; of course in a few years time the sensor will use the VR technology to self-align, and the focus system may well do something similar.

Edmund
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Edmund Ronald, Ph.D. 
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