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Author Topic: LaCie 724 LED Monitor  (Read 7446 times)
Porter Productions
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« on: March 05, 2009, 07:56:16 PM »
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We recently purchased the LaCie 724 LED monitor and are experiencing surreal colors.  We realize that it has a larger gamut than most monitors on the market, but even after calibrating, we aren't seeing "true" colors.  We photographed a Macbeth ColorChecker and the colors are more vibrant, especially the reds and magentas (they glow).  We've spoke to LaCie and, as of now, it sounds like there is a problem communicating between the monitor, calibration software, and calibrator.  Has anyone experienced similar problems with this monitor or other LED?
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Damo77
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« Reply #1 on: March 05, 2009, 11:45:53 PM »
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What calibrator did you use? Some of them don't handle wide-gamut monitors too well, from what I've read.

Also, you haven't mentioned what software you're using to view your images and judge the colour.  Can we assume that it's Photoshop or some other colour-managed software?
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Damien
Porter Productions
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« Reply #2 on: March 19, 2009, 02:39:34 PM »
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Quote from: Damo77
What calibrator did you use? Some of them don't handle wide-gamut monitors too well, from what I've read.

Also, you haven't mentioned what software you're using to view your images and judge the colour.  Can we assume that it's Photoshop or some other colour-managed software?


We are using the Blue Eye Pro calibrator that came packaged with the monitors. The problem is across the board in whatever viewing program you are in, Photoshop, Safari, Preview...... The monitor is calibrated and within specs., but with this Lacie 724 LED the colors are so pushed and vibrant that they are out of the standard industry mode for other monitors that our clients will be viewing our work on. We really can't count on making any color or exposure adjustments to our work using this monitor other than just by the numbers. We are stumped on whether we can use this monitor for critical evaluation.
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jerryrock
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« Reply #3 on: March 20, 2009, 05:00:34 PM »
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Quote from: Porter Productions
We recently purchased the LaCie 724 LED monitor and are experiencing surreal colors.  We realize that it has a larger gamut than most monitors on the market, but even after calibrating, we aren't seeing "true" colors.  We photographed a Macbeth ColorChecker and the colors are more vibrant, especially the reds and magentas (they glow).  We've spoke to LaCie and, as of now, it sounds like there is a problem communicating between the monitor, calibration software, and calibrator.  Has anyone experienced similar problems with this monitor or other LED?

I have the HP Dreamcolor that displays the largest color gamut available in an LCD monitor and in FULL GAMUT mode, web colors (especially reds) do appear over saturated. You must select the correct display mode for the type of job at hand. Exceeding the intended gamut of the media can bring on some unrealistic color.  Setting the monitor to sRGB or Adobe RGB will bring the gamut closer to the intended output.

The DreamColor monitor allows for individual calibration of each color gamut mode with the HP Advanced Profiling Solution. It consists of a custom filtered i1 Display2 with proprietary software that records the calibration data to the monitor's LUT.

Jerry
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Gerald J Skrocki
skrockidesign.com
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« Reply #4 on: March 21, 2009, 06:08:05 AM »
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Quote from: Porter Productions
We are using the Blue Eye Pro calibrator that came packaged with the monitors.

You sure that's not an EyeOne Dispaly? The Pro is actually a Spectrophotometer and would have no issues, assuming its running correctly with a wide gamut unit. The smaller, less expensive colorimeter which I think you may have, might have some difficulty with the primary colors.

What target calibration aim points are you asking for? Specifically white point and luminance?

Jerry, we're all thrilled you love your Dreamcolor. How's your post the least bit useful for the OP and his LaCie?
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Andrew Rodney
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« Reply #5 on: March 21, 2009, 03:25:55 PM »
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Quote from: digitaldog
Jerry, we're all thrilled you love your Dreamcolor. How's your post the least bit useful for the OP and his LaCie?

Andrew if you read the posts carefully you would see that that the OP's problem is not with calibration, but with the display setting. Using the full gamut setting while viewing images tagged with sRGB or Adobe RGB will produce the over-saturation that OP described.

The OP asked:
Quote
Has anyone experienced similar problems with this monitor or other LED?
I used my monitor as an example because it is also an RGB LED backlit monitor and I have experienced a similar phenomenon. The solution I proposed (to switch to sRGB or Adobe RGB) is valid.

More experience on your part with RGB backlit monitors would help you understand the situation fully and diminish your incipient need to negate the valid responses of others trying to help.
« Last Edit: March 21, 2009, 03:39:31 PM by jerryrock » Logged

Gerald J Skrocki
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« Reply #6 on: March 21, 2009, 03:29:29 PM »
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Quote from: jerryrock
Andrew if you read the posts carefully you would see that that the OP's problem is not with calibration, but with the display setting.

What makes you so sure? What's that got to do with a DreamColor (nada).

Quote
I used my monitor as an example because it is also an RGB LED backlit monitor and I have experienced a similar phenomenon. The solution I proposed (to switch to sRGB or Adobe RGB) is valid.

On your display yes, on his no. As per my experience with RGB backlit displays, I worked with the first one every produced!

http://www.ppmag.com/reviews/200602_neclcddisplay.pdf
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Andrew Rodney
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« Reply #7 on: March 21, 2009, 03:31:45 PM »
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Quote from: Porter Productions
The problem is across the board in whatever viewing program you are in, Photoshop, Safari, Preview...... T

Jerry, note that all the above are color managed applications. The problem is either calibration, a profile issue or a screwed up display. Again, got absolutely nothing to do with your experience with that DreamColor.
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Andrew Rodney
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jerryrock
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« Reply #8 on: March 21, 2009, 03:52:57 PM »
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Quote from: digitaldog
Jerry, note that all the above are color managed applications. The problem is either calibration, a profile issue or a screwed up display. Again, got absolutely nothing to do with your experience with that DreamColor.

Whether the application is color managed or not makes no difference to this monitor if it is set to display a gamut wider than the application can handle.

Maybe you should re-read your review of the outdated NEC monitor.

The Lacie 724 is a rebranded Samsung XL24.

Jerry

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Gerald J Skrocki
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« Reply #9 on: March 21, 2009, 04:52:08 PM »
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Quote from: jerryrock
Whether the application is color managed or not makes no difference to this monitor if it is set to display a gamut wider than the application can handle.

Maybe you should re-read your review of the outdated NEC monitor.

The Lacie 724 is a rebranded Samsung XL24.

Jerry, the only display that can alter the chromaticity is your beloved DreamColor. My NEC as well as the older NEC in my review have an sRGB setting. You're not getting a color managed behavior using that setting.
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Andrew Rodney
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jerryrock
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« Reply #10 on: March 21, 2009, 07:06:02 PM »
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Quote from: digitaldog
Jerry, the only display that can alter the chromaticity is your beloved DreamColor. My NEC as well as the older NEC in my review have an sRGB setting. You're not getting a color managed behavior using that setting.

I just downloaded the manual for the Lacie 724 and you are correct, the sRGB and Adobe RGB modes cannot be independently calibrated.  You faulted the NEC display in your review for that very same reason.

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Gerald J Skrocki
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« Reply #11 on: March 21, 2009, 10:26:27 PM »
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This is one of the major cool things about DreamColor. It really does allow one to work in both primaries (sRGB and whatever you want to call its native wide gamut behavior). I know of no other display that can do this.
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Andrew Rodney
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Ryan Grayley
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« Reply #12 on: March 22, 2009, 06:42:22 AM »
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Quote from: digitaldog
This is one of the major cool things about DreamColor. It really does allow one to work in both primaries (sRGB and whatever you want to call its native wide gamut behavior). I know of no other display that can do this.

But perhaps still more expensive than buying something like a Spectraview 2690 as well as an sRGB monitor?
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Ryan Grayley BA IEng MIET ARPS
RGB Arts Ltd, London, UK
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« Reply #13 on: March 22, 2009, 08:27:07 AM »
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Quote from: Ionaca
But perhaps still more expensive than buying something like a Spectraview 2690 as well as an sRGB monitor?

More screen real estate too.
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Andrew Rodney
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