Ad
Ad
Ad
Pages: [1]   Bottom of Page
Print
Author Topic: Maximizing a Apple Keynote Presentation  (Read 9545 times)
J. Paul
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 58


« on: March 08, 2009, 07:29:14 AM »
ReplyReply

Hello all,
I am giving my first presentation to a large group in April using Apple Keynote.  I have given a few smaller presentations to get the feel of Keynote and it worked out well.  There is supposed to be a AV person at my upcoming presentation and I just want to make sure I am preparing my images properly.  My questions are about sizing, color space and sharpening.  I have heard conflicting reports about color space output for projection (sRGB versus RGB).  Does this depend on the projector?  I am working in Adobe Lightroom so I can export to any Color Space.  I can also add sharpening on export.  Is a small amount of sharpening recommended?  What size should I output the images to for best quality?  Finally, are there some specific questions I should ask of the AV person to help with my presentation?
Many Thanks,
J. Paul
Logged
alexramsay
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 46


WWW
« Reply #1 on: March 13, 2009, 05:43:19 AM »
ReplyReply

Quote from: J. Paul
Hello all,
I am giving my first presentation to a large group in April using Apple Keynote.  I have given a few smaller presentations to get the feel of Keynote and it worked out well.  There is supposed to be a AV person at my upcoming presentation and I just want to make sure I am preparing my images properly.  My questions are about sizing, color space and sharpening.  I have heard conflicting reports about color space output for projection (sRGB versus RGB).  Does this depend on the projector?  I am working in Adobe Lightroom so I can export to any Color Space.  I can also add sharpening on export.  Is a small amount of sharpening recommended?  What size should I output the images to for best quality?  Finally, are there some specific questions I should ask of the AV person to help with my presentation?
Many Thanks,
J. Paul

I have exactly the same question - looking forward to your advice

Thanks,
Alex
Logged

PierreVandevenne
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 510


WWW
« Reply #2 on: March 17, 2009, 08:48:13 PM »
ReplyReply

Since nobody responded, I thought I would add my 2 - well, make that 1 - cent. I have worked with quite a few projectors, but certainly not as an art photographer. On the whole, the issue is quite messy. I am using a Canon XEED SX7 projector in house (and a bad Philips as well). Different projectors can yield _very_ different results.

Size: I would go for native resolution for the image. Downsample them in Photoshop (or any other decent resizer) to the exact size you are going to use. There is the potential for a lot of conversions in the output chain - OS, presentation program, projector zoom, etc). If you go "pixel for pixel", you can't go wrong. Colour space: that particular projector supports sRGB space - I believe most decent projectors do nowadays - but it may have to be set explicitly in the menu. Note that in addition to colour space, most projectors offer "modes" - presentation/photo/movie that have different colour balances. Last but not least, they also have different power levels for their lamps (often "silent" and "normal") which behave quite differently. Obviously, the lighting (or lack of it) of the presentation room matters a lot. For me, in a very dark room where I have total control, I use sRGB, silent mode, movie colour balance to get a warm atmosphere.  Sharpening: unless the presentation is done on a perfectly straight screen, with a very careful focus, your image will be a bit less than perfect in terms of sharpness. I would not hesitate sharpening a bit more than what I would do for full resolution on a large LCD.  But there is no magical recipe imho. Come early, and experiment a bit with the projector's settings. The ones I've used offer much more control over the image parameters than a typical monitor.  Occasionally, you'll stumble upon low end (or old high-end) projectors that can't be coerced into anything decent regardless of what you do.

If you have plenty of time, and a good projector, you can of course calibrate it with a colorimeter.
Logged
J. Paul
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 58


« Reply #3 on: March 18, 2009, 02:14:51 PM »
ReplyReply

Pierre,
Thank you for your response.  I must admit that I am still a bit confused, but that is my problem not yours.  Ultimately the best solution for more control would be to purchase a projector and calibrate it as a starting point.  I have much to learn about this.
Kind Regards,
J. Paul
Logged
alexramsay
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 46


WWW
« Reply #4 on: March 18, 2009, 02:40:22 PM »
ReplyReply

Quote from: PierreVandevenne
Since nobody responded, I thought I would add my 2 - well, make that 1 - cent. I have worked with quite a few projectors, but certainly not as an art photographer. On the whole, the issue is quite messy. I am using a Canon XEED SX7 projector in house (and a bad Philips as well). Different projectors can yield _very_ different results.

Size: I would go for native resolution for the image. Downsample them in Photoshop (or any other decent resizer) to the exact size you are going to use. There is the potential for a lot of conversions in the output chain - OS, presentation program, projector zoom, etc). If you go "pixel for pixel", you can't go wrong. Colour space: that particular projector supports sRGB space - I believe most decent projectors do nowadays - but it may have to be set explicitly in the menu. Note that in addition to colour space, most projectors offer "modes" - presentation/photo/movie that have different colour balances. Last but not least, they also have different power levels for their lamps (often "silent" and "normal") which behave quite differently. Obviously, the lighting (or lack of it) of the presentation room matters a lot. For me, in a very dark room where I have total control, I use sRGB, silent mode, movie colour balance to get a warm atmosphere.  Sharpening: unless the presentation is done on a perfectly straight screen, with a very careful focus, your image will be a bit less than perfect in terms of sharpness. I would not hesitate sharpening a bit more than what I would do for full resolution on a large LCD.  But there is no magical recipe imho. Come early, and experiment a bit with the projector's settings. The ones I've used offer much more control over the image parameters than a typical monitor.  Occasionally, you'll stumble upon low end (or old high-end) projectors that can't be coerced into anything decent regardless of what you do.

If you have plenty of time, and a good projector, you can of course calibrate it with a colorimeter.

My thanks too, Pierre. I've borrowed a Sanyo PLC-WXU10B which gave terrible colour until I found how to set it to Adobe RGB, which is the colour space of the JPEGs I was projecting. It's certainly not perfect, but is acceptable for a non-specialist audience. Do you think sRGB JPEGs might work better?

Alex
Logged

PierreVandevenne
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 510


WWW
« Reply #5 on: March 18, 2009, 05:17:45 PM »
ReplyReply

Quote from: alexramsay
My thanks too, Pierre. I've borrowed a Sanyo PLC-WXU10B which gave terrible colour until I found how to set it to Adobe RGB, which is the colour space of the JPEGs I was projecting. It's certainly not perfect, but is acceptable for a non-specialist audience. Do you think sRGB JPEGs might work better?

I can't say, or if I did, I would be well outside my area of expertise. IMHO, the projector's quality and its underlying technology matters much more than small colour adjustments (of course, big adjustments can damage about everything ;-0). The Philips, a pure DLP design, is awful in almost all configurations. The Canon, a LCOS design, amazed me when I first saw it and still does today - but again, I am not a professional photographer and am probably not as picky as pros would be. I see from your web site that you are located in UK. If you are planning a purchase, try to have a demo.  Apparently this shop in UK offers demoes and trials http://www.projectorpoint.co.uk/
« Last Edit: March 18, 2009, 05:20:19 PM by PierreVandevenne » Logged
Pages: [1]   Top of Page
Print
Jump to:  

Ad
Ad
Ad