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Author Topic: 500 c/m My first hasselblad  (Read 3552 times)
Leonardo Barreto
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« on: March 24, 2009, 12:19:26 PM »
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I just got this for $600 Free Shipping. I want to use it for leisure film (cNeg) travel and documentary street photography.

It is a camera that I admire and wanted. I wonder if it is a good price. My wish list is a 50mm f4 and the Mackro 120mm...






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mahleu
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« Reply #1 on: March 24, 2009, 01:27:19 PM »
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My first medium format was a 500cm. I wish I hadn't sold it but I couldn't afford the lenses I wanted
so I ended up selling it and buying a Mamiya RB67 kit for half the price, now i've sold that and all I have
left are a couple of TLR's. If something lighter than an RB comes along i'll be very tempted, my fridge
is still stocked with expired 120.
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marcwilson
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« Reply #2 on: March 24, 2009, 02:37:20 PM »
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yes pretty good price (based on uk prices!).
Looks like a nice one with speed wind crank also.

make sure the 50mm is at least black t* version if possible but if you go longer, such as the 150mm even the chrome lenses are fine where the coating seems to make less difference. the 150mm lenses can be found very cheaply.

May I suggest this:

Run a roll of film through it asap and get processed to check the spacing. If you find the frames are not evenly spaced then the film back is at fault...pretty much the only issue with these cameras.

Also worth checking each aperture / shutter speeds on the lens to check for any sticking etc.

They are really lovely cameras to work with and remember you can fit a prism finder vey easily if you need for hand held work.

Marc


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Leonardo Barreto
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« Reply #3 on: March 24, 2009, 03:38:27 PM »
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It is typical of me of first getting something and then ask for advice --or assembling and THEN reading instructions-- but in this case I was lucky. I got a C/M instead of a 500 C. I just read that M is for Modified and that it is a good modification since you can change focusing screen. Then I got a black lens T*. I wanted the classic look of the silver ones, but probably they put the T* for a reason. I just love the way this all metal lenses look like.

By the way, I got in some trouble with my shopping at eBay, I got, for $395 another 500 C/M, (but without lens) because I was sure I was going to be outbid and I wasn't ! so, I will get the two cameras and compare them, as you say, run a roll, and then keep the best pieces.





Quote from: marcwilson
yes pretty good price (based on uk prices!).
Looks like a nice one with speed wind crank also.

make sure the 50mm is at least black t* version if possible but if you go longer, such as the 150mm even the chrome lenses are fine where the coating seems to make less difference. the 150mm lenses can be found very cheaply.

May I suggest this:

Run a roll of film through it asap and get processed to check the spacing. If you find the frames are not evenly spaced then the film back is at fault...pretty much the only issue with these cameras.

Also worth checking each aperture / shutter speeds on the lens to check for any sticking etc.

They are really lovely cameras to work with and remember you can fit a prism finder vey easily if you need for hand held work.

Marc
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carstenw
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« Reply #4 on: March 24, 2009, 03:51:47 PM »
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I love these old cameras! I have a 500C and a 2000FC/M, and I love shooting with them.

Keep in mind that the 120 Macro doesn't go to 1:1, and you will need tubes to do macro work. Also, it is sharper up close than infinity, so depending on what you want to do, perhaps the 100 or 150 is a better choice?
« Last Edit: March 24, 2009, 03:52:17 PM by carstenw » Logged

marcwilson
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« Reply #5 on: March 24, 2009, 04:06:12 PM »
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Yes the CM is better.
As you have two bodies also check the waist level finder to see which is smoother in operation...not forgetting to check magnifier in it also.

And enjoy shooting through that huge viewfinder!

Marc
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Leonardo Barreto
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« Reply #6 on: March 24, 2009, 04:18:04 PM »
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I recently made a Google Image search with Hasselblad (also with the 50mm etc) and I discovered two things. One is that people who own this cameras shoot in a different way, a, say, Hasselblad way -similar probably to Rolleiflex- and, the stile is one I would like for myself. The other one is that the image themselves have a look that I don't see in MF digital, but then again, I may be under the influence of subjective force of being in love with the camera. Or, probably more the reason, I have not done the research in a serious manner. But this could be an actual effect. The way images look, even small, and not related to resolution. Probably the depth of field? don't know.  


Quote from: marcwilson
Yes the CM is better.
As you have two bodies also check the waist level finder to see which is smoother in operation...not forgetting to check magnifier in it also.

And enjoy shooting through that huge viewfinder!

Marc
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jsch
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« Reply #7 on: March 25, 2009, 06:10:14 AM »
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Hi,

I would check the film magazine. The inner part (which you can take out to put the film on) is usually custom fitted to the outer part. If you mix, that can lead to transport problems and problems with the plane position of the film.

You can check this easily. The magazine has a serial number. On the inner part you should find the last 3 digits of the serial number.

The cameras remind me of my youth. I used a 500C, 500EL and a 503CW (the best of them). Good luck.

Best,
Johannes
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marcwilson
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« Reply #8 on: March 25, 2009, 06:16:01 AM »
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yes a matching insert often means less chance of spacing problems but in the past I have used backs with matching inserts that have problems and those without that do not!...although resale value of thos with matching inserts is higher...
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« Reply #9 on: March 25, 2009, 07:02:31 AM »
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My first MF is H3DII-39, but i saw and held this camera 50x CM in the store where i bought my H3D, it looks sexy and great, i feel i want to buy one, even i asked about film MF and my eyes on this one, but really not sure what will this film add to me more than what i have, it is a desire more than the need.
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Leonardo Barreto
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« Reply #10 on: March 25, 2009, 07:43:14 AM »
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You are describing me exactly, except that I have had a Bronica, Mamiya twin lens reflex, the RB67, the RZ67 Graflex, Sinar 4x5 and now the 645 AFD and PhaseOne. I also have the Nikon D300 that is, in my opinion, a very matured generation of Nikons and has the benefits of DX (smaller lenses) and a very nice 12MP file.

So, why going back to film? I want to take this 500c/m to Nicaragua and do some landscape, documentary and portrait in MF while not worrying about the cost of my work sytem, or if the batteries are charged. Also the Hasselblad has a waist level finder, film advance is human powered, so the camera ends up being very small and compact.

I could aim for two application: fine art work and images for my stock library at Alamy. In other words, there is more than sufficient justification for the $601.50 invested (I will probably end up spending more when I fall in love with things like Carl Z. glass...  


Quote from: Professional
My first MF is H3DII-39, but i saw and held this camera 50x CM in the store where i bought my H3D, it looks sexy and great, i feel i want to buy one, even i asked about film MF and my eyes on this one, but really not sure what will this film add to me more than what i have, it is a desire more than the need.
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marcwilson
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« Reply #11 on: March 25, 2009, 07:52:42 AM »
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Quote from: Leonardo Barreto
So, why going back to film? I want to take this 500c/m to Nicaragua and do some landscape, documentary and portrait in MF while not worrying about the cost of my work sytem, or if the batteries are charged. Also the Hasselblad has a waist level finder, film advance is human powered, so the camera ends up being very small and compact.

I could aim for two application: fine art work and images for my stock library at Alamy. In other words, there is more than sufficient justification for the $601.50 invested (I will probably end up spending more when I fall in love with things like Carl Z. glass...


Just had a look at your older nicaragua shots from the eighties...great work.
But of course if you really want something square, small and compact for film then you can also look at the mamiya 6...I've used them in the past and am going to look at getting another soon. They don't replace the blad but can compliment it when weight and size is at a premium...
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Leonardo Barreto
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« Reply #12 on: March 25, 2009, 09:33:03 PM »
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Thank you marc, it seams so far away. I used the Canon 1F then, fantastic camera, heavy, they began using electronic shutters then and we felt a bit uncomfortable to depend on that battery ... look what happened now. I got the Hasselblad because I can. I always wanted one, so it is like a problem looking for solution here, but the Mamiya 6 would be a good film camera. I wonder how they compare in size and weight... what about price, wait, let me check... yep, not cheaper than Hasselblad, isn't it?


Quote from: marcwilson
Just had a look at your older nicaragua shots from the eighties...great work.
But of course if you really want something square, small and compact for film then you can also look at the mamiya 6...I've used them in the past and am going to look at getting another soon. They don't replace the blad but can compliment it when weight and size is at a premium...
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marcwilson
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« Reply #13 on: March 26, 2009, 02:15:13 AM »
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No not cheaper then the blad, much harder to find and less reliable and dependant on a battery..so yes lighter and smaller with a built in meter but very different..very different. Personally whatever camea I use, I always end up going back to my Hasselblad...even though it may be a touch more bulky, etc...it just works for me, even half way up. or down, a mountain!

Marc
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