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Author Topic: Close-Up retouching  (Read 1144 times)
mike.online
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« on: March 26, 2009, 01:03:25 AM »
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Hello,

I've posted this shot in the recent works, but I would like to see if I can get some specific feedback on the image and the post processing that I've done to it.

Here is the original:
[attachment=12491:mme_5156.jpg]

And here is the retouched version:
[attachment=12492:5156_edit.jpg]


Feel free to comment on the shot itself (composition and whatnot), it was shot using availiable indoor light, using the EF 50mm f/1.8 @ f/1.8, ISO 640 (i'm pretty sure...).

I would really like comments on the retouching effort, I've played around with healing a bit before but this is my first 'real' attempt with skin tones/texture, eyes, teeth, and hair.

I think that I will edit the shadow on the right side of the mouth and possibly liquify and pucker the nose a bit, to reduce the rounding that it has currently.

Also, if anytone has experience with retouching, I know that good lighting can really limit the amount of work required in post. waht lights and techniques do you use to smooth out the skin tones and blemishes? I understand that using shoot through unbrellas and shoft boxes will soften the light (thanks strobist) and that will help, but what other techniques are common to use when you are photographing non-professional models?

I'm really interested in taking studio and enivronmental portraits (hopefully on the cheap....) and and I also like being able to take candid shots at events with limited speelight modification (gary fong lightsphere II is the weapon du jour). However, working with those that are not beautiful models makes for long post processing. What I would love to hear about as well is how to light people to maximize thier beauty without a complex studio setup. how do you change your event photos from snapshots to beautiful captures of the moment?

not an easy answer i would imagine but feeback is always welcome, and even just passing me along to some well written tutorials/lessons/blogs are fantastic too.

Cheers,
- Michael
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dalethorn
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« Reply #1 on: March 26, 2009, 07:00:05 AM »
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Quote from: mike.online
Hello,
I've posted this shot in the recent works, but I would like to see if I can get some specific feedback on the image and the post processing that I've done to it.
Feel free to comment on the shot itself (composition and whatnot), it was shot using availiable indoor light, using the EF 50mm f/1.8 @ f/1.8, ISO 640 (i'm pretty sure...).
I would really like comments on the retouching effort, I've played around with healing a bit before but this is my first 'real' attempt with skin tones/texture, eyes, teeth, and hair.
I think that I will edit the shadow on the right side of the mouth and possibly liquify and pucker the nose a bit, to reduce the rounding that it has currently.
Also, if anytone has experience with retouching, I know that good lighting can really limit the amount of work required in post. waht lights and techniques do you use to smooth out the skin tones and blemishes? I understand that using shoot through unbrellas and shoft boxes will soften the light (thanks strobist) and that will help, but what other techniques are common to use when you are photographing non-professional models?
I'm really interested in taking studio and enivronmental portraits (hopefully on the cheap....) and and I also like being able to take candid shots at events with limited speelight modification (gary fong lightsphere II is the weapon du jour). However, working with those that are not beautiful models makes for long post processing. What I would love to hear about as well is how to light people to maximize thier beauty without a complex studio setup. how do you change your event photos from snapshots to beautiful captures of the moment?
not an easy answer i would imagine but feeback is always welcome, and even just passing me along to some well written tutorials/lessons/blogs are fantastic too.
Cheers,
- Michael

The skin tone has picked up a green tinge from the hair, on the chin area and forehead. That should be hard to fix. Lighting would solve that, like a very soft fill flash.
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mike.online
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« Reply #2 on: March 26, 2009, 07:34:45 AM »
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yeah, the green problem is something that i meant to mention as well, i'm planning on masking it out when i get some time
« Last Edit: March 26, 2009, 07:35:29 AM by mike.online » Logged

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