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Author Topic: Ruins panorama  (Read 1642 times)
lbalbinot
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« on: March 27, 2009, 03:31:37 PM »
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These are the remainings of an old spanish jesuit reduction in southern Brazil. Spanish jesuits used to christianize the indigenous populations until hell broke loose and a big war put an end to it all. The brave indian leader Sepé Tiaraju fought to his death and, before losing the battle, they set fire to it all and were never to be seen again. Thousands were cowardly murdered by firearms. If you go there there's a special light and sound show right after sunset where the whole story is told, don't miss it! If you are curious about it, check Wikipedia, they have a very accurate article.

This photograph is a panorama created by 5 shots stitched together using Photoshop's photomerge function. I used the panorama to achieve a never before seen composition, putting these rocks in front and creating a link to the ruins on the back. The sunset light gave a special color to the sandstone rocks.

I hope you enjoy it! Comments are very welcome.

Regards,
Luis
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Luis F Balbinot
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Bill Caulfeild-Browne
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« Reply #1 on: March 27, 2009, 06:35:02 PM »
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Beautiful, lovely light, very satisfying composition.
Bill
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BernardLanguillier
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« Reply #2 on: March 27, 2009, 08:57:39 PM »
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Quote from: lbalbinot
These are the remainings of an old spanish jesuit reduction in southern Brazil. Spanish jesuits used to christianize the indigenous populations until hell broke loose and a big war put an end to it all.

This photograph is a panorama created by 5 shots stitched together using Photoshop's photomerge function. I used the panorama to achieve a never before seen composition, putting these rocks in front and creating a link to the ruins on the back. The sunset light gave a special color to the sandstone rocks.

Nice image and ligh, thanks for sharing.

I seems to me that the very same compositon could be achieved with just about any camera though. In terms of crop, a 6x12 film back on a 4x5 camera would be the easiest way to have the same crop without loosing too much image information, but you could just crop a 35 mm Velvia to achieve the exact same result if the print size if limited...

Cheers,
Bernard
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A few images online here!
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« Reply #3 on: March 28, 2009, 12:12:29 AM »
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I like it.  You might want to crop a bit on the right, as the tree there pulls attention away from the ruin.

John
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mike.online
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« Reply #4 on: April 01, 2009, 12:58:15 AM »
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Quote from: BernardLanguillier
Nice image and ligh, thanks for sharing.

I seems to me that the very same compositon could be achieved with just about any camera though. In terms of crop, a 6x12 film back on a 4x5 camera would be the easiest way to have the same crop without loosing too much image information, but you could just crop a 35 mm Velvia to achieve the exact same result if the print size if limited...

Cheers,
Bernard


I'm with Bernard one this one.... I don't understand why this is a never before composition because you used photomerge. Couldn't you just get this from standing further back or with a wider lens?

the image itself looks good, however. looks like something off of a calendar, or in a local guidebook to ruins
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lbalbinot
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« Reply #5 on: April 02, 2009, 02:17:51 PM »
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Quote from: mike.online
I'm with Bernard one this one.... I don't understand why this is a never before composition because you used photomerge. Couldn't you just get this from standing further back or with a wider lens?

the image itself looks good, however. looks like something off of a calendar, or in a local guidebook to ruins

Hi! Thank you everyone for the comments!

To get this angle you can't go further back because there are some trees on the way and a wide angle lens would distort the rocks and the building in a much more agressive way. Something like this:

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2330/190748...12bd0510e_o.jpg

But yes, I guess you'd be able to get a similar result with a single shot and a wide angle lens.

The way this panorama was built allowed me to stretch up the elements in front and create a more interesting composition, without distorting the lines at the building. These rocks in front are not interesting at all in their natural disposition and they follow a very straight line. The panorama created a distortion that gave these rocks a curved path, which I liked very much.

Thanks!

Regards,
Luis
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Luis F Balbinot
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« Reply #6 on: April 03, 2009, 07:53:09 AM »
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Luis, It's a fine piece of work. I don't agree with button about the tree on the right. I think it's an important part of the composition. The structure itself is strong enough to prevent distraction by the tree and with a crop just to the right of the structure you'd end up with a composition out of balance.
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lbalbinot
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« Reply #7 on: April 03, 2009, 08:42:20 AM »
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Thank you Russ.

That corner where the tree is located is indeed very bright, but it looks a lot stronger on the computer screen than on paper. I made a large print on Epson's Velvet fine art paper and that bright spot behind the tree was reduced significantly to the point where it's not bothering me anymore. The Epson printer did a great job on the orange walls and they became so vivid that there's no doubt that the ruins are the main subject of the composition. I loved this new printer with the orange ink cartridge

BTW, I visited your website and loved your pictures, specially the ones from Japan.

Regards,
Luis
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Luis F Balbinot
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« Reply #8 on: April 03, 2009, 02:14:33 PM »
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Quote from: lbalbinot
Thank you Russ.

That corner where the tree is located is indeed very bright, but it looks a lot stronger on the computer screen than on paper. I made a large print on Epson's Velvet fine art paper and that bright spot behind the tree was reduced significantly to the point where it's not bothering me anymore. The Epson printer did a great job on the orange walls and they became so vivid that there's no doubt that the ruins are the main subject of the composition. I loved this new printer with the orange ink cartridge

BTW, I visited your website and loved your pictures, specially the ones from Japan.

Regards,
Luis

Thanks. A few of the pictures in that section are Japan but most of them are Korea -- during the war.
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