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Author Topic: NEC & SpectraviewII - Feedback greatly appreciated (Longish)  (Read 3309 times)
VanIsle
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« on: March 30, 2009, 11:19:55 AM »
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Hi all,

First a quick hello as this is my first post on the forum here. While I have used LL as a great resource for years, I have never participated in the forums. I have been a member at fredmiranda.com for 4.5 years. I have some questions about my new LCD display, and noticed in doing google searches that there seemed to be more discussion of the panel in question here (and its big brother the 3090), as compared to fredmiranda.com.

And thanks in advance for anyone having the patience to help me out.
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So I recently purchased the NEC MultiSync 2690WUXi2 and Spectraview II software with the kit calibrator.

I am setting a target intensity of 120cd/m2
Contrast Ratio: Monitor Default (It says with this setting it will maximize the contrast).
Gamma 2.2
White Point D65
Color Comp is at the default setting.

The results I am getting are showing very accurate colors (low Delta E values), and it hits the target brightness and White Point almost exactly.

But the contrast ratio winds up being only 267:1
Now I realize that the lower intensity (cd/m2) will reduce the theoretical maximum contrast ratio, but I wasn't expecting values this low. For those with experience with the NEC displays, does this seem correct to you?

As it is calibrated now, I really do notice that the contrast seems lacking. Checking out fredmiranda landscape forum (using Mozzila with color profiles enabled) many images look like they do not have enough contrast.

Is this something that you think the measured contrast ratio (267:1) for this intensity (120 cd/m2) is correct, or is something else hampering performance? I have read (and as per Spectraview) that even 80-90 cd/m2 is better for soft proofing... I am terrified at how poor the contrast may be then (turns out it was around 180:1 when I tried it).

Am I now only seeing images as they were intended (with low uninspiring contrast) or is something else possible going wrong here?

In doing some more reading around the internets...

Firstly, there seems to be the issue of what contrast ratio a print can achieve. It seems that the theoretical best for a print might be in the range of 200:1 or 300:1. With this being the case, the 267:1 I am achieving should be ok for soft proofing.

But it begs the question of how we view and evaluate the images that we share online. If everyone is using monitors with higher contrast ratios (500:1 to 1000:1), then doesnt it become difficult to compare images? If I tighten up the contrast of an image (while viewing on my 267:1), will that not mean that it will appear overly contrasty to a user using a panel with a higher contrast ratio? How is consistency and comparability maintained? By the same token, will I not be prone to thinking the images of others are lacking in contrast. If a print can only achieve 200 or 300:1 , then what basis of comparison becomes most meaningful?

But I digress. At the very least I would love to hear if my result of 267:1 at 120cd/m2 is similar to other users of the 2690wuxi2 panel.

I also wanted to add that I appreciate that my viewing environment will have an impact on my perceived contrast. I found that when shutting off my room lighting, the images I viewed looked better. Many appeared to have contrast that looked good... although comparing to my Dell 19" (which I reduced the brightness to match the NEC) they still appeared to be a bit lacking punch.

Finally, an issue about this new panel in general. My understanding was that the NEC panel uses IPS technology, which should allow for a better viewing angle with less shift in color. My second monitor is a Dell 19" TN panel, which should be comparatively worse in this regard. However, I am finding the NEC to be comparatively *worse* in this regard. When viewing a black or dark image on the NEC, any movement (note: not extreme movement) of my head to the right of the left reveals a kind of whitish glow to the dark areas on the panel. It does not stay black, but appears to have a bit of glowing whiteness to it. Much moreso than my Dell TN panel. Even when viewing a dark scene on the 2690xi2 head on, some parts of the image appear to suffer from this effect. Any viewing angle other than head on results in a quick decrease of (the already low) contrast, and the appearance of this "glow". Is this normal? (Maybe this is a result of the lack of A-TW polarizer. I guess I just expected it to be at least better than my poor old dell in this reagrd http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G2pIysomGPI...player_embedded )

Thanks infinitely in advance

Jeremy
« Last Edit: March 30, 2009, 11:43:57 AM by VanIsle » Logged
walter.sk
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« Reply #1 on: March 30, 2009, 02:33:21 PM »
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I am using the SpectraViewII software and the NOC LCD3090, and very happy with the results.

Do not worry about the contrast level.  Mine as of the last calibration/profiling is 250:1 and is quite adequate for softproofing.  If anything, the contrast permits detail to show on the monitor in shadow areas that simply do not show up in prints, but that is to be expected.

I use the monitor for editing/softproofing images, but also for non-editing functions, web browsing, etc, and the contrast ratio is never too low.

I currently have my monitor at d65, gamma of 2.2, luminosity of 135cd/m2, and the contrast ratio is 250:1.
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VanIsle
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« Reply #2 on: March 31, 2009, 01:19:51 PM »
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Thanks very much for the feedback Walter

After talking to NEC support, I think I am content that the contrast ratio is in line with what it should be. I am still interested in hearing the comments of others with respect to what basis of comparison is meaningful. What is the point of viewing eachothers images at high contrast ratios that a print could never achieve?

I still have some concern about the off angle whitish glow in dark areas. I am going to take a video and send to NEC support to see what they say.
« Last Edit: March 31, 2009, 01:20:05 PM by VanIsle » Logged
vjbelle
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« Reply #3 on: March 31, 2009, 02:13:31 PM »
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I don't have the software yet - it should be here any day now.  So far I have calibrated all of my monitors with PM 5 with very satisfactory results.  I will use SpectraviewII with my i1pro and am eager to see if using the built in 12 bit lut is better than software calibration through my display card.  You didn't mention which picture mode you are using.  Are you using Adobe?  My monitor is very even from edge to edge - no color variation or brightness variation.  I only get these results when I use the Adobe picture mode.
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LA30
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« Reply #4 on: March 31, 2009, 04:30:00 PM »
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My luminosity is 140.  I love the 1st gen monitor with the spectraview software.

Ken
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sakharov
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« Reply #5 on: April 06, 2009, 03:36:07 PM »
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Quote from: VanIsle
After talking to NEC support, I think I am content that the contrast ratio is in line with what it should be. I am still interested in hearing the comments of others with respect to what basis of comparison is meaningful. What is the point of viewing eachothers images at high contrast ratios that a print could never achieve?

SpectraView II - Preferences - Calibration Options - Calibration Priority - Maximize Contrast Ratio.

Contrast Ratio at my NEC2690 is 428:1 for 100cd/m

This option could be used if shadows color calibration is less important than contrast ratio.
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walter.sk
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« Reply #6 on: April 06, 2009, 08:47:20 PM »
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Quote from: sakharov
SpectraView II - Preferences - Calibration Options - Calibration Priority - Maximize Contrast Ratio.

Contrast Ratio at my NEC2690 is 428:1 for 100cd/m

This option could be used if shadows color calibration is less important than contrast ratio.
My use of the NEC 3090 is for editing photographs, and a more accurate curve in the darker tones is more important than a higher contrast ratio for that use.  In addition, if the contrast ratio of the display is much higher than that of the prints, the detail apparent in the display will not be what is seen in the prints, exaggerating the difference between display and print.
« Last Edit: April 06, 2009, 08:47:59 PM by walter.sk » Logged
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