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Author Topic: Misty Morning  (Read 2027 times)
shothunter
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« on: April 12, 2009, 06:09:44 AM »
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So today for various reasons I got up fairly early - I took my camera along and was blessed with a very pretty sight as the sun rose...
So I got out of the car and since I was on a rigid schedule I tried to get the most out of what I saw in a short time, tell me if it works - would you like to see a yet different crop, remove or add something, convert it to b&w? I'd appreciate any input.

happy easter
ed
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"I never bracket (...), bracketing is a sign of insecurity, (...) it means you don't really know what you're doing..."
Ansel Adams, 1983 BBC Series
Randy Carone
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« Reply #1 on: April 12, 2009, 08:26:26 AM »
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Beautiful location and shot. My disclaimer is that I'm quite nervous about messing with someone else's capture, but...

I cropped the dark area on the left and brought the sky down to bring the buildings out a bit more. I removed the fence post(?) on the right. I hit it with 30% PK Capure Sharpen, Medium Edge. I didn't want to lose the softness but wanted to define the tree lines. I tried B & W but the natural pastel glow of the morning sun is lost. I really like the natural sepia.

Edit - now that I see it uploaded, I'd delete the sharpening.
« Last Edit: April 12, 2009, 08:31:55 AM by Randy Carone » Logged

Randy Carone
shothunter
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« Reply #2 on: April 14, 2009, 03:29:57 AM »
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Quote from: Randy Carone
Beautiful location and shot. My disclaimer is that I'm quite nervous about messing with someone else's capture, but...

I cropped the dark area on the left and brought the sky down to bring the buildings out a bit more. I removed the fence post(?) on the right. I hit it with 30% PK Capure Sharpen, Medium Edge. I didn't want to lose the softness but wanted to define the tree lines. I tried B & W but the natural pastel glow of the morning sun is lost. I really like the natural sepia.

Edit - now that I see it uploaded, I'd delete the sharpening.


Thanks for taking the time to work with my image, appreciate the effort. I agree with cropping the dark area on the left and removing the fence post on the right. I'm not sure though about the buildings, I was in a hury when taking this image so I didn't really pay attention to everything in the frame and I when reviewing it on screen I wished I had either included more of the buildings or left them out completey - hence the crop to a square.
I thought about adding even more softness but haven't tried it yet...

thanks again for taking the time!
ed
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"I never bracket (...), bracketing is a sign of insecurity, (...) it means you don't really know what you're doing..."
Ansel Adams, 1983 BBC Series
John R
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« Reply #3 on: April 14, 2009, 04:38:19 AM »
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Quote from: shothunter
...I was in a hury when taking this image so I didn't really pay attention to everything in the frame and I when reviewing it on screen I wished I had either included more of the buildings or left them out completey - hence the crop to a square.
...ed
Actually I agree with your assessment. And the way you have critiqued your image is the way we all learn. I think most of the time we just react and hope that what we learned is automatically incorporated in our picture taking. The image has a very nice quality to it. The dark tree on left may be problem, but not having space on the left of the other tree also strikes me as problematic. It needs the room that you referred to on right of the buildings. I do like your square crop, but elected a slightly more rectangular and lighter treatment. But really it is fine image and almost any reasonable crop will look good.

JMR
« Last Edit: April 14, 2009, 04:52:00 AM by John R » Logged
jasonrandolph
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« Reply #4 on: April 14, 2009, 10:50:10 AM »
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Overall, I like the image.  I agree that cropping out the dark rock on the left is important.  And since hindsight is 20/20, I think including more of the house on the right (vice cutting it off) would balance the tree on the left in the composition.  With it cut down the center, I would crop it out so that no one is distracted by the house.  Otherwise, I like the early morning mood that you captured.  I find myself missing the morning mist, and this brings back memories of waking up to a scene like this.  Thanks for bringing me back to times long gone!
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kaelaria
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« Reply #5 on: April 14, 2009, 12:32:44 PM »
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My eye goes right to the contrails.
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dalethorn
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« Reply #6 on: April 14, 2009, 09:59:25 PM »
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I think almost anything will work with this photo, as long as the change is very minor. The original has that near-perfect and serene look that can be lost by too big a change.
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shothunter
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« Reply #7 on: April 17, 2009, 12:24:28 PM »
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Quote from: John R
But really it is fine image and almost any reasonable crop will look good.

JMR

Thanks a lot, John, I actually think the way you cropped it is a really good solution, like it very much, thanks for your thoughts!
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"I never bracket (...), bracketing is a sign of insecurity, (...) it means you don't really know what you're doing..."
Ansel Adams, 1983 BBC Series
shothunter
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« Reply #8 on: April 17, 2009, 12:34:52 PM »
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Quote from: jasonrandolph
I find myself missing the morning mist, and this brings back memories of waking up to a scene like this.  Thanks for bringing me back to times long gone!

You're very welcome - it's always good to hear that one's (at times quite puny) attempts at creating art generate emotional response like this...
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"I never bracket (...), bracketing is a sign of insecurity, (...) it means you don't really know what you're doing..."
Ansel Adams, 1983 BBC Series
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