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Author Topic: Charleston wetland  (Read 1191 times)
dalethorn
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« on: April 17, 2009, 01:42:02 PM »
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Not terribly exciting, but it's about as good as I could do with a flat, green landscape like this.
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Geoff Wittig
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« Reply #1 on: April 17, 2009, 07:11:31 PM »
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Quote from: dalethorn
Not terribly exciting, but it's about as good as I could do with a flat, green landscape like this.

Urgh.
My son just moved to Charleston last month; when I visit I guess I won't expect much worth photographing!
More seriously, I can see how this might be interesting if it it was shot at first/last light; but I have a real aversion to photos with "McMansions" in them. Too much of a reminder of how affluent folks are destroying landscape photo opportunities by parking their second homes smack in the middle of the best vistas.
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dalethorn
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« Reply #2 on: April 17, 2009, 07:56:06 PM »
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Quote from: Geoff Wittig
Urgh.
My son just moved to Charleston last month; when I visit I guess I won't expect much worth photographing!
More seriously, I can see how this might be interesting if it it was shot at first/last light; but I have a real aversion to photos with "McMansions" in them. Too much of a reminder of how affluent folks are destroying landscape photo opportunities by parking their second homes smack in the middle of the best vistas.

Actually I'm close to the developer, and here's what I surmise from them: They're protecting the wetlands by zoning these areas under agreements to do and not do certain things, so the land remains in the state you see.  I can't be absolutely sure since I'm not an insider to the business, but for example, the owner of that property is restoring the land to what they call a "native state".  That means new trees and foliage planted there will be those native to the area historically, not something brought from elsewhere.  BTW, there are a couple of alligators who make homes now and then on the front yard pond of that property, and they're not pets.

The photo wasn't intended to be the more popular example of fine art, but I think it does show the house to be a very tiny part of the property - it's 2/3 of a mile from there to the road.  I should also mention that a large amount of restoration has taken place in that area since Hugo wiped out most of the trees in 1989, and that effort wasn't funded by the government for the most part.
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