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Author Topic: Obtaining shooting permits  (Read 16328 times)
Justan
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« Reply #20 on: December 10, 2009, 11:39:23 AM »
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I agree that it’s always better to ask forgiveness than to let little things like rules get in the way. If you are convincing, people will generally help you.

I wanted to share a story about my getting around the rules long ago while attending an NBA game. In my home town I was able to get, uh, really good seating due to family connections, but I wasn’t in my home town. Before the game started I went to the floor area and sat in one of the photographer’s designated areas on the court, just outside the boundary, at end court, in the corner. About 5 minutes after I got there, someone from security tapped me on the shoulder and asked for my press credentials. I said I was a photographer for my school paper, and that I did not have any press credentials with me. The person told me to wait right were I was. I was left alone until about 1 minute before the end of the game. At that point in time 2 police officers approached me, said that since I didn’t have press credentials that I’d have to go back to my assigned seat. I was naturally okay with that and thanked them. In the end, i got 4 rolls of fotos. I also got an interview with the editor of the town news paper as a result of my actions. (He was in the spot next to me).
« Last Edit: December 10, 2009, 11:43:58 AM by Justan » Logged

bill t.
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« Reply #21 on: December 10, 2009, 02:21:28 PM »
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Quote from: RSL
Bill, Well, I didn't say that just because a museum excludes cameras I don't shoot pictures in museums. The funniest encounter I remember was about a year ago when a friend and I went to a museum in Orlando (won't say which one). Both of us were carrying cameras. His was an SLR hung around his neck. Mine was an Epson R-D1 with the strap around my wrist and the camera in my hand. As soon as we got through the door he was told that no photographs were allowed in the museum. He took his camera back out to the car. I began walking around shooting. Eventually I ran into a guard. Stood there chatting with him for about five minutes with the camera still in my hand and, as near as I could tell he never saw the camera. I think the key to rule breaking is the fact that most administrators and factotums tend to think in cliches. A camera around your neck is a camera. A camera in your hand is more or less invisible -- not because it's not visible, but because it's in the wrong place.
Sometimes the rules will simply evaporate in the sunlight of a good conversation.  Have also seen instances where phallicly adorned SLR's were turned away at the door whereas clueless looking P&S's were admitted.  Cliches can be exploited.

Does anybody have a URL to the picture of Cartier-Bresson approaching a subject with his Leica concealed in his backward-turned, cupped hand?  That picture really got my attention in my hot blooded youth.

And good work Justan, you have a natural feel for the ground rules of rule breaking.
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patrickt
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« Reply #22 on: December 22, 2009, 09:13:12 AM »
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Quote from: bill t.
Rules schmules!  Forgive my seeming arrogance, but those with a reasonable respect for rules had better stick to taking pictures at the zoo, and only from designated areas.

Seeming arrogance? Oh, no. Real, live, adolescent arrogance. Actual, "I'm the center of the universe," arrogance. I was at a wedding in an historic, and beautiful, old church. There was a sign at the door that said, "This is a private ceremony, please be respectful." Two tourists walked down the center aisle and got within six feet of the bride, groom, and priest and proceeded to take flash pictures. At the time, I thought, "What jackasses." But now I realize that just have cojones. Cajones would be drawers.

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patrickt
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« Reply #23 on: December 22, 2009, 09:23:24 AM »
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BillT: "Rules schmules! Forgive my seeming arrogance, but those with a reasonable respect for rules had better stick to taking pictures at the zoo, and only from designated areas. Just when did photographers stop packing Cajones? Back in the good old days it was clearly apparent to my impressionable young self that the guys who were getting the great shots were not the guys who were respectful of rules, passes, or permissions or who were particularly fearful of litigation. Forgive us our timidity, Cartier-Bresson, Capra, Weegee, et al, we are unworthy of your example."
,
Seeming arrogance? Oh, no. It's actually arrogance. It's real, live, adolescent "I can do what I want" arrogance. The kind of arrogance that confuses cajones with cojones and Capra with Capa.

I went to a friends wedding in an historic, and beautiful, old church. As I went in the sign at the door said, "This is a private ceremony, please be respectful." Two tourists strolled won the aisle and stood about eight feet from the bride, groom, and priest and proceeded to take photos with flash. At the time, I thought, "What jackasses." Now I realize that were just incredibly brave.

For some, respect is obviously something they demand but don't give.

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bill t.
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« Reply #24 on: December 23, 2009, 10:33:10 PM »
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Quote from: patrickt
BillT: "Rules schmules! Forgive my seeming arrogance, but those with a reasonable respect for rules had better stick to taking pictures at the zoo, and only from designated areas. Just when did photographers stop packing Cajones? Back in the good old days it was clearly apparent to my impressionable young self that the guys who were getting the great shots were not the guys who were respectful of rules, passes, or permissions or who were particularly fearful of litigation. Forgive us our timidity, Cartier-Bresson, Capra, Weegee, et al, we are unworthy of your example."
,
Seeming arrogance? Oh, no. It's actually arrogance. It's real, live, adolescent "I can do what I want" arrogance. The kind of arrogance that confuses cajones with cojones and Capra with Capa.

I went to a friends wedding in an historic, and beautiful, old church. As I went in the sign at the door said, "This is a private ceremony, please be respectful." Two tourists strolled won the aisle and stood about eight feet from the bride, groom, and priest and proceeded to take photos with flash. At the time, I thought, "What jackasses." Now I realize that were just incredibly brave.

For some, respect is obviously something they demand but don't give.

That unfortunate wedding event is an example not of good rule breaking but rather of simple cluelessness run amok.  Also sorry I got some names and spellings wrong, how dreadful!  FYI "Cajones" is now in common use among all ethnic groups in the American Southwest and has only one widely agreed upon meaning.  Also I never demand rules-based respect, although I am happy to receive it and return it when it comes from the heart.

As I previously mentioned, rule breaking in its most beneficial form must be used with big-hearted consideration and insight.  Do not confuse the actions of wedding-busting schmucks with the actions of the great rule breakers.  

I do not advocate callous rule breaking.  But I encourage a recognition that rules are for the most part over-generalized job justifications from ever increasing armies of small minded bureaucrats with no vision whatsoever which when appropriately swept aside bring sunlight and reason and joy to all.
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JamiePeters
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« Reply #25 on: December 23, 2009, 11:01:35 PM »
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Rules are meant to be broken, but when in Paris if the police confront you pack it up.  Or else they will pack it up for you.  I was there and I saw a photographer with a tripod and they told him to pack it up and he was just to slow for their comfort so they decided to help him.

They did not bother me,  I guess they are allergic to tripods.  By the great site first time poster.  JP
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patrickt
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« Reply #26 on: December 25, 2009, 09:09:19 AM »
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BillT: So those with a "reasonable respect for rules" should stick to the zoo but those who ignore rules and sweep them aside bring sunlight and joy. Well, they do. To themselves. I'll try to remember that next Easter at the Procession of Silence when a tourist with a large butt and a wide-angle lens wriggles past the barricades, sweeping aside the pesky rules, to get in the faces of the penitents and in the photos of everyone else. Sunlight and joy. That's what he's bringing. I'll have to remember that.

Rules aren't, in fact, made to be broken. They're frequently made to deal with the self-centered who preceded you. Where I live there are few rules. The ones we have, such as no tripods in museums, archeological sites, and churches, were created because on those who blocked access with their tripods.





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bill t.
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« Reply #27 on: December 25, 2009, 01:27:31 PM »
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Have a nice day, Patrick.  
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Rob C
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« Reply #28 on: December 31, 2009, 11:00:12 AM »
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Cojónes, cajónes and cojínes, what a busy month we are having! At least no roundabouts.

Rob C
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bill t.
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« Reply #29 on: December 31, 2009, 04:19:52 PM »
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Quote from: Rob C
Cojónes, cajónes and cojínes, what a busy month we are having! At least no roundabouts.

Rob C

My usage is of course the correct usage.  Here in New Mexico and I think most of the American Southwest we have over the last decade come to use "cajones" as a sort of polite, family-friendly version of "cojones" which refers in street Spanish to appendages only guys have.  Even local native Spanish speakers recognize this convention.

As an exmple one can speak of a politician as having the cajones to stand up to this or that.  And I have even seen the quality of having cajones applied to ladies as a synonym of "courage" although rarely.

It should be carefully noted that cajones qualifying acts must involve at least a bit of rudeness, ie. one can not be overly polite about something and still manifest cajones.
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