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Author Topic: 2 monitors, 2 different colours  (Read 2110 times)
petermarrek
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« on: April 29, 2009, 01:10:00 PM »
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Recently replaced one of two NEC 2090 with a NEC2690, profiled both with Spectraview II, they a different colour base whith a blank grey screen. Should they not be the same? Have run the profiling several times, no change.
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Paul Sumi
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« Reply #1 on: April 29, 2009, 03:29:42 PM »
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Quote from: petermarrek
Recently replaced one of two NEC 2090 with a NEC2690, profiled both with Spectraview II, they a different colour base whith a blank grey screen. Should they not be the same? Have run the profiling several times, no change.

Three obvious observations (all of which can affect display output):

1) You have an older monitor with XXX hours of operation and and a new monitor with far fewer hours

2) One is a sRGB monitor and the other a wide gamut LCD

3) The LCDs are undoubtedly of different types and specs

That said, did you calibrate both monitors to exactly the same parameters (luminance, color temp, etc)?  For example, if one is brighter than the other, this migfht account for the differences you see.

Paul
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petermarrek
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« Reply #2 on: April 29, 2009, 06:37:17 PM »
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Quote from: PaulS
Three obvious observations (all of which can affect display output):

1) You have an older monitor with XXX hours of operation and and a new monitor with far fewer hours

2) One is a sRGB monitor and the other a wide gamut LCD

3) The LCDs are undoubtedly of different types and specs

That said, did you calibrate both monitors to exactly the same parameters (luminance, color temp, etc)?  For example, if one is brighter than the other, this migfht account for the differences you see.

Paul
There's a few hundred hours difference (NOT MUCH ) between them, they are very similar specs ( same family of monitors ) really same thing/different sizes. Peter
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WillH
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« Reply #3 on: April 29, 2009, 07:06:16 PM »
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Quote from: petermarrek
Recently replaced one of two NEC 2090 with a NEC2690, profiled both with Spectraview II, they a different colour base whith a blank grey screen. Should they not be the same? Have run the profiling several times, no change.

You are mixing a wide gamut display with a standard gamut display. It is very difficult to get them to match perfectly by measurement instrument alone - especially if you aren't using either a spectro device, or a specifically calibrated colorimeter like the new MDSVSENSOR2 included in the SVII-PRO-KIT.

Your best bet is to use a mixed calibration method which involves visually matching the two displays and then calibrating.

From the SpectraView FAQs:
http://www.necdisplay.com/supportcenter/mo...ectraview2/faq/


QUESTION: Im using two different displays and calibrating both to the same target, however the white points do not match exactly. What can I do to improve this?

ANSWER: This issue can be caused by the different spectral outputs of the two displays causing the human eye to see color differences differently than the color sensor used to calibrate the displays. In this case the numerical measurements from the color sensor are identical on both displays, but they do not visually match. Manually visually matching one display to another can usually avoid this issue. The basic steps to take are as follows:

   1. Calibrate both displays.

   2. Pick one of the displays to be a reference. Call this display #1.

   3. Select display #2 in SpectraView and open the Custom White Point dialog. Use the Visual Match tool to adjust the white color so it visually matches white shown on display #1.

   4. When a visual match is achieved, put the sensor over the measurement area and click Measure. This will enter the value that the sensor perceives into the White Point. Save this as a new Target.

   5. Recalibrate display #2 with this new Target. From now on always use the respective Target to calibrate each display.
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Will Hollingworth
Senior Manager, Product Development
NEC Display Solutions of America, Inc.
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