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Author Topic: Golden era for photography  (Read 26269 times)
RSL
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« Reply #80 on: June 30, 2009, 01:04:20 PM »
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Quote from: Rob C
Itīs what has always made the world go round.

Have you ever wondered about the odd train of thought that finds horniness in the young admirable, but not so magnificent with the old? Given the downright cruel nature of life, I would have thought that a priapic old guy was worth more than a now-and-again young one.

Just a mild thought, which reminds me of those boats on trailers you see in seaside towns like this one: "Tender to..." imagine owning a boat called Tumescent.

Itīs quite hot here in Spain just now; one loses a lot of moisture so I suppose Iīd better go and have some water.

Rob C

I wasn't knocking it. I like girls too. But when Stieglitz began his "relationship" with Dorothy she was 22 and he was 64. In addition, he was still married to O'Keeffe, Dorothy was married and had one kid, and their relationship went way beyond "friendship."

I can imagine a boat with that name. I think I've seen farther-out names than that on boats in Florida, but I can't recall exactly what they were.
« Last Edit: June 30, 2009, 01:21:40 PM by RSL » Logged

dalethorn
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« Reply #81 on: June 30, 2009, 02:08:12 PM »
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Quote from: RSL
I wasn't knocking it. I like girls too. But when Stieglitz began his "relationship" with Dorothy she was 22 and he was 64. In addition, he was still married to O'Keeffe, Dorothy was married and had one kid, and their relationship went way beyond "friendship."
I can imagine a boat with that name. I think I've seen farther-out names than that on boats in Florida, but I can't recall exactly what they were.

You didn't clarify what you meant with the age differences.  Does it imply that a man is hornier when he selects a young friend, or less so, just wanting female companionship from someone who is more outdoors-adventurous, intellectually curious, not stuck in the past, etc.?  And what exactly is wrong or questionable with having friends of the opposite gender, or different ages?

Do you remember the time when Roseann and Tom wanted to marry a third person, for a genuine state-sanctioned three-way?  Now that's what I call imagination, which is sadly lacking in so may places (hint).
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Rob C
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« Reply #82 on: June 30, 2009, 04:07:28 PM »
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[quote name='dalethorn' date='Jun 30 2009, 08:08 PM' post='294739']

"Do you remember the time when Roseann and Tom wanted to marry a third person, for a genuine state-sanctioned three-way?"



Dale, who are Ros and Tommy? I guess they are somewhat confused... much as I seem to find myself.

Rob C
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RSL
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« Reply #83 on: June 30, 2009, 04:26:48 PM »
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Quote from: Rob C
"Do you remember the time when Roseann and Tom wanted to marry a third person, for a genuine state-sanctioned three-way?"

Dale, who are Ros and Tommy? I guess they are somewhat confused... much as I seem to find myself.

Rob C

Rob, You're not the one who's confused.

By the way, I forgot to mention that Stieglitz started making it with O'Keeffe while his wife, Emmy was away, and when she returned she threw him out of the house. In the winter, in Florida I have a lecture I give to central Florida photography groups titled, "Photographers we can learn from." The title's grammar leaves something to be desired but I have fun with the lectures. Stieglitz always gets more laughs than any of the others.
« Last Edit: June 30, 2009, 04:27:26 PM by RSL » Logged

Rob C
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« Reply #84 on: July 03, 2009, 04:03:13 PM »
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Quote from: RSL
Rob, You're not the one who's confused.

By the way, I forgot to mention that Stieglitz started making it with O'Keeffe while his wife, Emmy was away, and when she returned she threw him out of the house. In the winter, in Florida I have a lecture I give to central Florida photography groups titled, "Photographers we can learn from." The title's grammar leaves something to be desired but I have fun with the lectures. Stieglitz always gets more laughs than any of the others.



Russ, you could fix that by refusing to end it with a preposition and demanding a round of applause instead.

;-)

Rob C

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RSL
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« Reply #85 on: July 03, 2009, 04:42:50 PM »
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Quote from: Rob C
Russ, you could fix that by refusing to end it with a preposition and demanding a round of applause instead.

;-)

Rob C

Rob, To quote a source with whom I'm sure you're familiar: "This is the kind of impertinence up with which I will not put."

 
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Rob C
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« Reply #86 on: July 04, 2009, 03:20:16 AM »
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Quote from: RSL
Rob, To quote a source with whom I'm sure you're familiar: "This is the kind of impertinence up with which I will not put."

 


At nine forty-five in the morning, the dishes still in the sink, Iīm glad I visited Lula just now; I think I will make it through the rest of the day. Amazing the power of a little giggle - much like that naplam in the morning buzz.

Funny thing Iīve noticed: the days seem to be getting longer and more tedious yet my weeks fly past ever more quickly. Doesnīt seem to be much point in thinking about upgrading cameras, cars or anything at all - the awkward  'what for?ī always crosses my mind at some stage of the process. Ironically, I have managed to get a local gallery to grant me a show next April, but the initial enthusiasm has vanished, leaving in its wake the realisation that perhaps I donīt really want a show at all, that what I wanted was to be granted one, not the bother of all that must surely follow that little victory.

Finally finished Atlas Shrugged, which Iīd been reading in the two-hour bursts of battery life over bar lunches. Such a strange book; oddly, the main failure I felt it to show was in the descriptions of Agnyīs romantic passion. It felt totally false; I couldnīt imagine a woman ever feeling that way, yet, it was written by one. Somewhere, either in her idea of how romantic sections should read or in mine, conditioned to expecting something else, it jarred. To be honest, I eventually found myself skipping over them in embarrassment at how awkward they felt. Perhaps it explains why beauty commercials are as they are. Also, she does seem to be making the same point over and over again, much like a dog with a soft doll between its teeth. (Much like some of the arguments here, in fact. Are there that many Ayn Rand fans on board?) However, with her being of Russian origin, I guess it isnīt difficult to understand what was driving her.

Rob C
« Last Edit: July 04, 2009, 05:22:53 AM by Rob C » Logged

dalethorn
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« Reply #87 on: July 04, 2009, 08:43:03 AM »
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Quote from: Rob C
Dale, who are Ros and Tommy? I guess they are somewhat confused... much as I seem to find myself.
Rob C

Roseann Barr and Tom Arnold.  TV show actors and comedians.  These two have a very complex and funny approach to humor, which goes over the heads of many people, particularly those people who understand only the stereotypical roles of men and women described in the common literature of 75 years ago.

Roseann's singing of the national anthem at a public event some years ago was one of those that made history.
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Rob C
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« Reply #88 on: July 04, 2009, 11:22:41 AM »
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Quote from: dalethorn
Roseann Barr and Tom Arnold.  TV show actors and comedians.  These two have a very complex and funny approach to humor, which goes over the heads of many people, particularly those people who understand only the stereotypical roles of men and women described in the common literature of 75 years ago.

Roseann's singing of the national anthem at a public event some years ago was one of those that made history.


Dale

TV is a desert for me. I can get a selection of news channels on satellite as well as some BBC ones early in the day - at night the latter tend to break up - and the only series that reached intact recently has been Friends, over and over and exactly as often over again as was M.A.S.H., where the game with both was to try and come up with the lines before the actors did. I made a mean Miss Aniston, except for the voice, well, perhaps I also lacked the hair and certainly I lacked the young bumps. Perhaps not as good an impersonation as I had imagined.

We got House for a couple of seasons, until it became really popular, when the pay-channels cornered it and made it impossible for us expats. to watch anymore. Such is life.

Spanish terrestrial TV is unobtainable because we are screened by a hill; Spanish satellite TV is pointless because of the programmes. So I watch or, rather, donīt, wall-to-wall Michael Jackson over breakfast. Starts the day off well. Well enough to tune me into LuLa in hasty retreat. Me, not LuLa.

Cheers - Rob C
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RSL
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« Reply #89 on: July 04, 2009, 12:05:20 PM »
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Quote from: dalethorn
Roseann's singing of the national anthem at a public event some years ago was one of those that made history.

Rob, I don't know whether or not you heard about Roseann's rendition of the national anthem, but I can tell you that since her performance she's been regarded by most sane Americans with about as much love and enthusiasm as is Benedict Arnold.
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« Reply #90 on: July 04, 2009, 01:30:02 PM »
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Quote from: Rob C
At nine forty-five in the morning, the dishes still in the sink, Iīm glad I visited Lula just now; I think I will make it through the rest of the day. Amazing the power of a little giggle - much like that naplam in the morning buzz.

Funny thing Iīve noticed: the days seem to be getting longer and more tedious yet my weeks fly past ever more quickly. Doesnīt seem to be much point in thinking about upgrading cameras, cars or anything at all - the awkward  'what for?ī always crosses my mind at some stage of the process. Ironically, I have managed to get a local gallery to grant me a show next April, but the initial enthusiasm has vanished, leaving in its wake the realisation that perhaps I donīt really want a show at all, that what I wanted was to be granted one, not the bother of all that must surely follow that little victory.

Finally finished Atlas Shrugged, which Iīd been reading in the two-hour bursts of battery life over bar lunches. Such a strange book; oddly, the main failure I felt it to show was in the descriptions of Agnyīs romantic passion. It felt totally false; I couldnīt imagine a woman ever feeling that way, yet, it was written by one. Somewhere, either in her idea of how romantic sections should read or in mine, conditioned to expecting something else, it jarred. To be honest, I eventually found myself skipping over them in embarrassment at how awkward they felt. Perhaps it explains why beauty commercials are as they are. Also, she does seem to be making the same point over and over again, much like a dog with a soft doll between its teeth. (Much like some of the arguments here, in fact. Are there that many Ayn Rand fans on board?) However, with her being of Russian origin, I guess it isnīt difficult to understand what was driving her.

Rob C

Yes, I know about the long days the short weeks and even shorter months and shorter yet years. It's called growing old(er).

Congrats on the show and best of luck with it. I was supposed to have one here in Colorado Springs last year but shortly before it was to happen the gal who owned the gallery folded up and moved back east. Ah well, now I can think of all the work I didn't have to do to get ready for it. What comes to mind, though, from what you said, is something I read in a book about poetry back when I was sending in manuscripts and getting them published fairly regularly: "Having a poem published is like dropping a feather into a well and listening for the splash."

Yes, Ayn Rand was a weird woman. She knew what she was talking about because she'd lived it in Russia, but I never saw her as a very competent novelist. On the other hand, Atlas Shrugged is the kind of book that sticks with you, especially here in the U.S. as we go farther and farther into socialism. If you've read the book, reading the morning newspaper can be terrifying because what you read is echoed in your memory of the book. What's most terrifying, though, is that people not only have stopped reading Atlas Shrugged, they've stopped reading. They watch the tube instead. Sometimes I'm happy that I'm almost eighty and won't have to live the rest of the story. But then I think about my kids and grandkids and have to stop and pray.
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Rob C
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« Reply #91 on: July 05, 2009, 04:21:57 PM »
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Quote from: RSL
Yes, I know about the long days the short weeks and even shorter months and shorter yet years. It's called growing old(er).

Congrats on the show and best of luck with it. I was supposed to have one here in Colorado Springs last year but shortly before it was to happen the gal who owned the gallery folded up and moved back east. Ah well, now I can think of all the work I didn't have to do to get ready for it. What comes to mind, though, from what you said, is something I read in a book about poetry back when I was sending in manuscripts and getting them published fairly regularly: "Having a poem published is like dropping a feather into a well and listening for the splash."

Yes, Ayn Rand was a weird woman. She knew what she was talking about because she'd lived it in Russia, but I never saw her as a very competent novelist. On the other hand, Atlas Shrugged is the kind of book that sticks with you, especially here in the U.S. as we go farther and farther into socialism. If you've read the book, reading the morning newspaper can be terrifying because what you read is echoed in your memory of the book. What's most terrifying, though, is that people not only have stopped reading Atlas Shrugged, they've stopped reading. They watch the tube instead. Sometimes I'm happy that I'm almost eighty and won't have to live the rest of the story. But then I think about my kids and grandkids and have to stop and pray.


Bang on the money, with Atlas Shrugged. Thatīs the worrying part about it, the experience of creeping socialism, part of the reason I had for quitting Britain all those years ago, and why so many more are doing the same. Many a day the UK TV services show groups of people standing in France, trying to catch the underside of a truck in an effort to smuggle themselves across the English Channel. Now ask yourself this: they have escaped from Africa or eastern Europe or wherever, are already in the mighty European Community, but that wonīt do, for some reason. What reason might that be? Simple: the UK is being ruined by idiots with their hearts on their sleeves and turnips in their heads; the socialist/fellow traveller parties are wise to the fact that the greater the volume of the underclass, the larger the vote from that body to follow, so they have a vested interest in growing it, whilst paying lip service and lying to the rest of the populace. And who better to do their work for them than the dreamers? Not a month ago, the ruling party admitted that it really had no idea how many illegal immigrants it had let slip through its fingers... The various diasporas provide the perfect hiding place and, in time, social services jump in and deliver and then along comes the vote! And then the relatives, and on it rumbles.

In Spain, on the other hand, they are much more careful. If you havenīt worked you donīt collect. Unemployment benefit lasts for up to six months (we have folks in the UK who have NEVER worked). But, not surprisingly, race relations are a damn sight more friendly in Spain. I experienced an example of that recently. A chap who plays sax in jazz groups, whom I know slightly via a friendly Frenchman, was sitting busking at the top of the Calvario here. We exchanged smiles and I sat down on the steps beside him and chatted a little about music. Turns out he comes from Cuba and that there is/was a huge gap in Cuban musiciansī opportunities to hear jazz after the events of the late fifties. No music in and none out. So they missed a lot of the US music. But there you are, Scots, French, Cubans and Spanish getting along fairly comfortably together because nobody is holding a gun at any head dictating thou shalt love! Itīs only ever going to be the way to make it fly.

But hey, folks prefer to think its all propaganda from the right. Miss Rand could have told them otherwise.

Rob C
« Last Edit: July 05, 2009, 04:23:56 PM by Rob C » Logged

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