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Author Topic: Ektar 100 120  (Read 25367 times)
BernardLanguillier
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« on: May 31, 2009, 02:28:51 AM »
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Dear all,

Has someone already started to use the new Kokak Ektar 100 in 120 rolls?

How does it scan on an Imacon and how is the detail/colors/DR relative to Provia 100F?

Thanks.

Cheers,
Bernard
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mikeseb
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« Reply #1 on: May 31, 2009, 09:16:42 AM »
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Bernard, I have shot perhaps 7-8 rolls of 120 Ektar. It is a fantastic film. Very sharp, very fine grain. I have shot little transparency film so not much basis for comparison; but its DR easily equals that of any other color negative film I've shot.

I've scanned it on both a Nikon 9000 and a Hasselblad 646 and it scans extremely well with either. It looks great with the Nikon's built-in "color negative" profile via Nikon Scan. There is no Imacon profile fir it that I know of; I think I used one for Portra VC or Fuji 160S which got me in the ballpark.

If you've not tried it you should. Kodak really hit a homer with Ektar.    

I'm scannng some images now--I'll try to get back here with one or two as examples.
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« Reply #2 on: May 31, 2009, 09:17:17 AM »
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I have just shot a couple of rolls of it. But I only got it back in the last two days and had only had it roll scanned so it is not comparable to drum scans. My use is different from many so perhaps it will not be as applicable to landscape shooters and others.

I can say that I am very pleased so far. I used it where I would have otherwise used Portra 160VC. I was concerned that skin tones would be excessive but not the case. The Ektar had just the added punch in color and contrast that I would bring up in PhotoShop. My first reaction was "this is so real".

I also have shot a couple of rolls of 35mm Ektar 100 around a swimming pool. Again I was pleasantly surprised with skin tones. The water in the pool was just beautiful.

Anyway I will post some as I go. But right at the moment I am sold. I do wish they would bring it out in 220.

I can't compare it to Provia because I was never much of a Provia user.
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Ian L. Sitren
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BernardLanguillier
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« Reply #3 on: May 31, 2009, 05:29:10 PM »
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Thank you gentlemen, much appreciated. It looks like my 6x12 film back will get used agian. :-)

Cheers,
Bernard
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Eric Myrvaagnes
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« Reply #4 on: May 31, 2009, 07:39:35 PM »
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Quote from: BernardLanguillier
Thank you gentlemen, much appreciated. It looks like my 6x12 film back will get used agian. :-)

Cheers,
Bernard
Bernard,

I am astonished to hear that you still use that stuff -- what's it called again? --- Ah: "Film!"


I'm curious: when you do your stitched images from film, do you use a Singer sewing machine to stitch the negs or trannies together?  

Cheers,

Eric  

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sergio
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« Reply #5 on: May 31, 2009, 08:37:14 PM »
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Shooting film puts me in a special mood for taking pictures. Sometimes it is very inspiring and routine liberating to drastically change your usual tools. Like forcing yourself to shoot with a lens you seldom use, or use another format. It sparks creativity. One of the reasons I used 4x5 so much was not only because of IQ, but because of the way it made me relate with what I was photographing. It puts me in a different perspective, in a different way of seeing, and that's what photography is all about for me.
« Last Edit: May 31, 2009, 08:38:04 PM by sergio » Logged

BernardLanguillier
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« Reply #6 on: June 01, 2009, 04:55:59 PM »
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Quote from: EricM
I'm curious: when you do your stitched images from film, do you use a Singer sewing machine to stitch the negs or trannies together?

I have been using a soon to be patented Belgian chocolate based welding technique... good stuff!

Cheers,
Bernard
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BernardLanguillier
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« Reply #7 on: June 01, 2009, 05:02:59 PM »
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Quote from: sergio
One of the reasons I used 4x5 so much was not only because of IQ, but because of the way it made me relate with what I was photographing. It puts me in a different perspective, in a different way of seeing, and that's what photography is all about for me.

I can very much relate to that.

Cheers,
Bernard
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Eric Myrvaagnes
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« Reply #8 on: June 01, 2009, 10:57:11 PM »
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Quote from: BernardLanguillier
I have been using a soon to be patented Belgian chocolate based welding technique... good stuff!  

Cheers,
Bernard
I have always preferred the French chocolate. Michel Cluizel 99% is perfect for the job.  

Eric


P.S. It was only during the last few years of my film photo career that I began to appreciate even the value of developing film. Gently slipping the bottom sheet up onto the top of the stack and jiggling the tray gently, and then repeating for sometimes up to 15 minutes in total darkness: one can learn patience, and do some good meditating. Digital has no procedure that is the psychological equivalent of developing film.

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« Reply #9 on: June 01, 2009, 11:39:15 PM »
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Quote from: EricM
P.S. It was only during the last few years of my film photo career that I began to appreciate even the value of developing film. Gently slipping the bottom sheet up onto the top of the stack and jiggling the tray gently, and then repeating for sometimes up to 15 minutes in total darkness: one can learn patience, and do some good meditating. Digital has no procedure that is the psychological equivalent of developing film.


Too true...

Mike.
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BernardLanguillier
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« Reply #10 on: June 02, 2009, 06:44:09 AM »
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Quote from: EricM
I have always preferred the French chocolate. Michel Cluizel 99% is perfect for the job.

We'll probably have to agree to disagree on that one...

Cheers,
Bernard

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Eric Myrvaagnes
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« Reply #11 on: June 02, 2009, 09:44:38 PM »
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I should mention also that I was a bit confused when I first saw the title of this thread. "Ektar 100 120?" What's that? I once had an Ektar, but it was a 175. That is, a 7" Aero Ektar f/2.5 lens. It was a monster, which I managed to fit to my 4x5 view camera for a few shots. No built-in shutter, however, which made it a bit awkward to use.

Then I dimly recalled that Kodak has recycled the grand old "Ektar" lens name for afilmof all things!  

Cheers,
Eric

P.S. I'll concede that Belgian chacolate can be quite acceptable. In fact I'd say Belgian is to French sort of as Nikon is to Canon.  
And even Belgian can surpass French on isolated occasions, when in the hands of a master, like Bernard!
« Last Edit: June 02, 2009, 09:47:53 PM by EricM » Logged

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BernardLanguillier
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« Reply #12 on: June 03, 2009, 03:32:38 AM »
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Quote from: EricM
P.S. I'll concede that Belgian chacolate can be quite acceptable. In fact I'd say Belgian is to French sort of as Nikon is to Canon.  
And even Belgian can surpass French on isolated occasions, when in the hands of a master, like Bernard!

Are you trying to conduct two brand wars at the same time???  

Cheers,
Bernard
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situgrrl
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« Reply #13 on: June 03, 2009, 09:31:37 AM »
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I prefer Swiss chocolate myself.....

<ducks>
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DarkPenguin
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« Reply #14 on: June 03, 2009, 11:44:15 AM »
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Quote from: EricM
I have always preferred the French chocolate. Michel Cluizel 99% is perfect for the job.  

Eric


P.S. It was only during the last few years of my film photo career that I began to appreciate even the value of developing film. Gently slipping the bottom sheet up onto the top of the stack and jiggling the tray gently, and then repeating for sometimes up to 15 minutes in total darkness: one can learn patience, and do some good meditating. Digital has no procedure that is the psychological equivalent of developing film.

I dunno.  I find the 12 minutes between the time I press print and the time my HP B9180 figures out that I was talking to it to be peaceful.


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Rob C
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« Reply #15 on: June 03, 2009, 03:37:10 PM »
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Quote from: DarkPenguin
I dunno.  I find the 12 minutes between the time I press print and the time my HP B9180 figures out that I was talking to it to be peaceful.


Good God, Mr P, a fellow user!

Do you have problems getting strong reds? I seem to produce lots of terracotta instead. Have tried isolating these colours and winding up the strength as far as it will go, but to little avail. I now try to avoid red in the picture. Or stay with black and white which it does very well indeed.

Rob C
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DarkPenguin
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« Reply #16 on: June 03, 2009, 03:47:32 PM »
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Quote from: Rob C
Good God, Mr P, a fellow user!

Do you have problems getting strong reds? I seem to produce lots of terracotta instead. Have tried isolating these colours and winding up the strength as far as it will go, but to little avail. I now try to avoid red in the picture. Or stay with black and white which it does very well indeed.

Rob C

It is a tremendous black and white printer.  I have some trouble with muddy greens and yellows.  (If they're mixed.)  Not sure about red.
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Eric Myrvaagnes
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« Reply #17 on: June 03, 2009, 06:52:22 PM »
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Quote from: DarkPenguin
I dunno.  I find the 12 minutes between the time I press print and the time my HP B9180 figures out that I was talking to it to be peaceful.
Hi Dark,

You should, of course, be agitating your B9180 gently during those 12 minutes.
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Eric Myrvaagnes
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« Reply #18 on: June 03, 2009, 06:53:25 PM »
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Quote from: BernardLanguillier
Are you trying to conduct two brand wars at the same time???  

Cheers,
Bernard

Of course I am. I've just gotten tired of all the usual Deardorff vs. Minox battles around here.

Cheers,

Eric
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DarkPenguin
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« Reply #19 on: June 03, 2009, 07:15:02 PM »
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Quote from: EricM
Hi Dark,

You should, of course, be agitating your B9180 gently during those 12 minutes.

I seem to have that reversed as the B9180 does a nice job of agitating me during those 12 minutes.
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