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Author Topic: room lighting for your work space?  (Read 6973 times)
abiggs
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« Reply #20 on: June 09, 2009, 09:11:48 AM »
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When I sell a print locally, I typically ask a question about their lighting setup. I always assume horrendous lighting, but whatever answer I get back I take this into account when I proof my print in that lighting environment.
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Andy Biggs
http://www.andybiggs.com
Africa Photo Safaris | Workshops | Fine Art Prints
neil snape
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« Reply #21 on: June 13, 2009, 01:11:21 AM »
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Quote from: abiggs
Call me a color weirdo, but I actually have about 6 different light sources in my studio in an attempt to replicate many different viewing environments that my customers may have. In my printing room, I have a strip of track lights with 3500K, 4100K and 4700K Solux bulbs. No windows in this room. In another room I have incandescent floods, outside windows, overhead fluorescents and a few table lamps. It is interesting to move around a print between different light sources, for sure, but my favorite lights to use for my own eyes are the 3500K Solux bulbs.
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Not at all a color weirdo,  if anything a critical power user. It wasn't until I started to walk around and try different lighting sources and multiple reflection sources that I realised just how much metamerism affects display and control printing. I started to see that even the items to be proofed such as the cosmetics I was shooting for advertising had color changes compared to the proof in interesting and sometimes opposite directions than the inkjet pigmented proofs.
This type of control is not only for comparing perceived  color but also for bronzing and gloss differential. They are not the same in various lighting which I'm sure you'll see.
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