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Author Topic: Wetland Stem and Leaves  (Read 4334 times)
dalethorn
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« on: June 09, 2009, 11:36:26 PM »
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Each time I take a walk I try to photograph some plant life along with the usual birds and animals, but I rarely get anything that has a look I immediately like. The sun was getting low and casting some light between the bushes and weeds in the wetland area, and when I saw the light on the yellow leaves, I knew I had a keeper.  Panasonic G1, 45-200, ISO 100.
« Last Edit: June 10, 2009, 03:05:27 PM by dalethorn » Logged
wolfnowl
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« Reply #1 on: June 10, 2009, 12:16:44 AM »
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Great work.  Love the lighting!  And sumacs are so soft...

Mike.
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RSL
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« Reply #2 on: June 10, 2009, 10:54:51 AM »
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Apparently the sumacs were so soft that they, and the rest of the picture disappeared.
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dalethorn
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« Reply #3 on: June 10, 2009, 11:41:52 AM »
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Quote from: RSL
Apparently the sumacs were so soft that they, and the rest of the picture disappeared.

Alas, a lot of things have disappeared. Maybe if we just say a little prayer, they'll come back.
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RSL
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« Reply #4 on: June 10, 2009, 01:41:32 PM »
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Quote from: dalethorn
Alas, a lot of things have disappeared. Maybe if we just say a little prayer, they'll come back.

So, what are you saying? That you changed your mind and you're embarrassed for people to see it?
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dalethorn
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« Reply #5 on: June 10, 2009, 02:10:25 PM »
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Quote from: RSL
So, what are you saying? That you changed your mind and you're embarrassed for people to see it?

Many things are deleted here that are beyond my control. One of the mysteries of life.

Just repeat to yourself, Russ - "God grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change."
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Jeremy Payne
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« Reply #6 on: June 10, 2009, 02:17:58 PM »
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Quote from: dalethorn
Many things are deleted here that are beyond my control.
Really?  I've never seen anything just vanish.
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dalethorn
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« Reply #7 on: June 10, 2009, 02:23:43 PM »
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Quote from: Jeremy Payne
Really?  I've never seen anything just vanish.

Doesn't happen very often.
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RSL
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« Reply #8 on: June 10, 2009, 02:33:06 PM »
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Quote from: dalethorn
Many things are deleted here that are beyond my control. One of the mysteries of life.

So while you're praying, why don't you just re-post it?
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dalethorn
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« Reply #9 on: June 10, 2009, 03:06:09 PM »
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Quote from: RSL
So while you're praying, why don't you just re-post it?

There - it should show now.
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RSL
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« Reply #10 on: June 10, 2009, 03:08:47 PM »
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It's the best thing I've seen you do, Dale. I agree with Mike.
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JeffKohn
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« Reply #11 on: June 10, 2009, 03:09:22 PM »
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I think it's actually one of your better images. I like the lines, and the color contrast. The space at the top of the frame doesn't add anything IMHO though; I think if you crop from the top, so that the yellow leaves are closer to the edge of the frame it will add a little visual tension and create a more interesting image.
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oldcsar
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« Reply #12 on: June 10, 2009, 06:45:31 PM »
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Hi Dale,

I agree that this is a keeper. What I like about this shot is the quality of the light, which was lacking in other shots of yours (for instance, the pastoral shot of the horses). While I am convinced the composition works, it could have been even better if the camera were shifted slightly to the left during capture. I like the details that the in-focus leaves provide, but directly to the right of it there is empty space that could be sacrificed to improve the overall composition. If you had shifted slightly to the left, the yellow/orange leaf would be in an ideal spot regarding rule-of-thirds. Nonetheless, as it stands, this shot is probably the most beautiful that you've posted here with respect to quality of light.
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shutterpup
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« Reply #13 on: June 10, 2009, 06:59:41 PM »
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Quote from: oldcsar
Hi Dale,

I agree that this is a keeper. What I like about this shot is the quality of the light, which was lacking in other shots of yours (for instance, the pastoral shot of the horses). While I am convinced the composition works, it could have been even better if the camera were shifted slightly to the left during capture. I like the details that the in-focus leaves provide, but directly to the right of it there is empty space that could be sacrificed to improve the overall composition. If you had shifted slightly to the left, the yellow/orange leaf would be in an ideal spot regarding rule-of-thirds. Nonetheless, as it stands, this shot is probably the most beautiful that you've posted here with respect to quality of light.

I too like the light in this shot. But I think that it looks "straight on." If you had changed the angle of the shot as Oldcsar suggests, I think it would be an even stronger shot.
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dalethorn
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« Reply #14 on: June 10, 2009, 08:14:28 PM »
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Quote from: oldcsar
Hi Dale,
I agree that this is a keeper. What I like about this shot is the quality of the light, which was lacking in other shots of yours (for instance, the pastoral shot of the horses). While I am convinced the composition works, it could have been even better if the camera were shifted slightly to the left during capture. I like the details that the in-focus leaves provide, but directly to the right of it there is empty space that could be sacrificed to improve the overall composition. If you had shifted slightly to the left, the yellow/orange leaf would be in an ideal spot regarding rule-of-thirds. Nonetheless, as it stands, this shot is probably the most beautiful that you've posted here with respect to quality of light.

I certainly agree with all of this - I took this through a fence, and on the other side of the fence, through a gap between two trees.  I took several shots with slightly different perspectives, but couldn't move much either way, left or right.  Within the past few months, my LLVJ education is enabling me to move my focus and ability to "see" in a better direction, which interestingly enough, isn't so much technical as it is just having things "sink in" to my brain.  So thanks for the tips.
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RSL
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« Reply #15 on: June 10, 2009, 09:05:52 PM »
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Dale, You're not going to be able to improve it by changing the shooting angle. If you'd moved to the right or the left, the way the light falls on the leaves would be very different and probably not as good. I see what Jeff's saying about cropping but I don't agree. I think the yellow leaves, which are the focus of the picture are right where they belong. The location even fits the rule of thirds. It's a very good composition just as it stands, and the slight softness of the green leaves in the background is exactly what you want. Good job.
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dalethorn
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« Reply #16 on: June 10, 2009, 10:55:34 PM »
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Quote from: RSL
Dale, You're not going to be able to improve it by changing the shooting angle. If you'd moved to the right or the left, the way the light falls on the leaves would be very different and probably not as good. I see what Jeff's saying about cropping but I don't agree. I think the yellow leaves, which are the focus of the picture are right where they belong. The location even fits the rule of thirds. It's a very good composition just as it stands, and the slight softness of the green leaves in the background is exactly what you want. Good job.

Thanks for the different perspective.  I learn best (when I learn) by comparing different viewpoints.  Now if I can only take this advice and actually apply it at capture time, then I'll have really learned something.
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oldcsar
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« Reply #17 on: June 10, 2009, 11:06:56 PM »
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Unsurprisingly, I can't agree with the perspective that adjusting the shooting angle by x degrees is going to change the light- this really depends on the direction of the light source, and shouldn't be too affected unless the photographer were directly between the light source and focal object. You are entitled to disagree with me, but I only ask that you consider the real-estate of the captured frame, and what you can do to maximize the drawing power of the focal object and minimize the amount of unused space.
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Jim Pascoe
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« Reply #18 on: June 11, 2009, 04:56:33 AM »
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I hope you do not mind me cropping one of your pictures again, but I think the light is lovely, and just needs the eye to be kept into subject.[attachment=14446:Leaves10.jpg]

Jim
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dalethorn
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« Reply #19 on: June 11, 2009, 05:41:51 AM »
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Quote from: Jim Pascoe
I hope you do not mind me cropping one of your pictures again, but I think the light is lovely, and just needs the eye to be kept into subject.
Jim

Looks good. This is one of those cases where I'd print both, with the portrait-oriented version one paper size smaller, and hang them on adjoining walls. I see references here often to cropping for a different perspective, but don't recall anyone suggesting they'd display alternate crops in the same gallery. Just one of those things I'd like to hear more about.
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