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Author Topic: WB adjustment  (Read 1020 times)
deeyas
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« on: June 12, 2009, 02:01:18 PM »
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Hey folks!

Been a while since I posted anything here, so thought I'd contribute. Here are two images taken around sunset, with the WB adjusted in-camera.
My objective was to see how a scene can be changed by using the Kelvin settings (as opposed to using auto or the other presets).

C&C  appreciated!

     Image #1 : 45455 K


     Image #2 : 5318 K

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dalethorn
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« Reply #1 on: June 12, 2009, 02:27:32 PM »
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Light often changes that way by itself, so if you were trying to simulate that, you did it well.
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RSL
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« Reply #2 on: June 12, 2009, 02:54:55 PM »
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Deeyas,

Sorry, but you asked for a critique, not an attaboy: I don't understand what you were trying to do. If your objective is to see what colors you get from changes in color temperature you can shoot a raw file of something like this and then play with Kelvin settings all day long in Photoshop, going from one extreme to another and back again without having to shoot more pictures.

There doesn't seem to be much in #2 other than a black blob with a light band above it and another below it. Number 1 is a little better, mainly because of the "Boathouse Closed" sign, but to make something useful out of it you'd need a little more light on the lettering of the sign.

Stephane Desnault made an important point in the "Hot Spring, Lake Bogoria" thread just below this one. She said: "...each time I compose, I ask myself the question 'Ok, now what is the subject of that picture?', with the understanding that "'landscape' is not an acceptable answer." That pretty much sums up my problem with your post. What is the subject of the picture?
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deeyas
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« Reply #3 on: June 12, 2009, 03:36:24 PM »
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Thank you for your comments! These photos were part of a workshop and the topic for that day was WB. The objective here was to play with the WB in-camera (and not in LR or CS3). I quite liked the results from this "as-is" shoot, and thought I'd share. I agree, the subject isn't strong, and in the case of the second photograph, not present!
I was running out of light, and I had to shoot (to complete the assignment!) and this is the result.

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