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Author Topic: summer leaves  (Read 2565 times)
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« on: June 29, 2009, 12:04:07 AM »
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Time to actually produce something...

[attachment=14910:summer_leaf.jpg]
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cmi
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« Reply #1 on: July 02, 2009, 09:38:58 AM »
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The translucence on the leaves is very nice, but there is too much going on for me. Maybe a even smaller detail with a different angle would be better.

Christian
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RSL
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« Reply #2 on: July 02, 2009, 09:48:53 AM »
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John, I hate to say it, but I will: It's a pretty leaf, but so what? Your "Red" is in a different class.
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« Reply #3 on: July 02, 2009, 11:32:53 AM »
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Quote from: RSL
John, I hate to say it, but I will: It's a pretty leaf, but so what? Your "Red" is in a different class.

I figured as much, since it sat without comment for a few days.  I was more interested in the light and geometry than the leaves themselves.  Thanks for the comments.

John
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« Reply #4 on: July 02, 2009, 12:08:31 PM »
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John, Yes, the light's good and so is the geometry, but the leaves need something to be set off against. It was worth a try, but it seems to me that leaves, like sitting birds, aren't inherently interesting. They need some sort of contrasting element to beat against.
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John R
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« Reply #5 on: July 02, 2009, 12:53:07 PM »
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I have attempted many such shots myself, but almost always, no matter how beautiful the light or interesting the geometric patterns of the leaves or trees, powerful white light draws attention to itself and ruins the image. In this case, it is not a small amount of white light, which could otherwise blend in and be part of the image, but it is overwhelming and powerful.

JMR
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« Reply #6 on: July 02, 2009, 01:12:04 PM »
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Quote from: RSL
John, Yes, the light's good and so is the geometry, but the leaves need something to be set off against. It was worth a try, but it seems to me that leaves, like sitting birds, aren't inherently interesting. They need some sort of contrasting element to beat against.

Quote from: John R
I have attempted many such shots myself, but almost always, no matter how beautiful the light or interesting the geometric patterns of the leaves or trees, powerful white light draws attention to itself and ruins the image. In this case, it is not a small amount of white light, which could otherwise blend in and be part of the image, but it is overwhelming and powerful.

JMR

Thanks for the observations.  I knew this wasn't a knockout image, but I thought it might generate some discussion.  Thinking more about it, I also agree with Christian, in that too many elements fight for attention.

John
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pegelli
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« Reply #7 on: July 03, 2009, 06:09:43 AM »
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Support most observations other have made. My way of saying it is that the white bokeh blobs demand too much attention and distract from the nice tranlucent light and pattern of the leaf.
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pieter, aka pegelli
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« Reply #8 on: July 03, 2009, 03:59:31 PM »
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Quote from: pegelli
Support most observations other have made. My way of saying it is that the white bokeh blobs demand too much attention and distract from the nice tranlucent light and pattern of the leaf.

I didn't say anything when I first looked at this, because I felt the same way.  This image would be excellent if the white spots could be suppressed some.
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walter.sk
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« Reply #9 on: July 04, 2009, 08:50:44 AM »
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I agree with the comments above.  An additional thought:  If you single out a small group of leaves, regardless of whether you consider them less important than the light and shapes, the viewer will still close in on the leaves.  In that case, the expectation is probably of seeing clean, if not perfect leaves.  If you choose to show damaged leaves, the damage should probably be striking in nature, in which case it becomes a statement.  The leaves you've depicted are damaged in a very average way, and I think it detracts from your image.
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cmi
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« Reply #10 on: July 04, 2009, 09:15:58 AM »
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Quote from: walter.sk
I agree with the comments above.  An additional thought:  If you single out a small group of leaves, regardless of whether you consider them less important than the light and shapes, the viewer will still close in on the leaves.  In that case, the expectation is probably of seeing clean, if not perfect leaves.  If you choose to show damaged leaves, the damage should probably be striking in nature, in which case it becomes a statement.  The leaves you've depicted are damaged in a very average way, and I think it detracts from your image.

I want to add to this too because I think these are good thoughts. When spring started I tried my best to make some images of flowers and leaves. I eventually found out that the hard part was actually finding some flowers wich appeared ideal for themselfes, in front of the right backgrounds, with the right light shinging on them, without wind, taken from about an exactly right angle - every millimeter counts - and of course from tripod. Quickly you end up crawling in the dirt and setting up your tripod with odd angles. Until this I imagined close ups of such subjects to be easy. Boy, was I wrong. I dont want to compare the difficulties, but Im definately more capable doing normal landscape and bigger scale details. Such small stuff takes *a lot* of time and patience. Not to discourage anyone, just telling my experience what it takes.

Christian

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John R
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« Reply #11 on: July 04, 2009, 12:10:45 PM »
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I don't want to appear to be rubbung it in, but I want to show my own example of a similar shot, though not quite translucent like yours. I think on the whole it is not bad, but some of the highlights are just too white, as shown in the circled areas.

JMR
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« Reply #12 on: July 04, 2009, 11:14:22 PM »
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Quote from: John R
I don't want to appear to be rubbung it in

Not at all.  Your mention of the white areas and the negative weight they carry will definitely give me pause the next time I shoot.  Thanks for all the comments, everyone- they have been helpful.  Posted below is the shot that I originally wanted to show but didn't, given the out of focus part of the bottom of the leaf.  I think this image displays stronger composition, but I'll let you be the judge of that.

[attachment=15118:leaf2.jpg]

John
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cmi
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« Reply #13 on: July 05, 2009, 12:47:22 PM »
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Quote from: button
Not at all.  Your mention of the white areas and the negative weight they carry will definitely give me pause the next time I shoot.  Thanks for all the comments, everyone- they have been helpful.  Posted below is the shot that I originally wanted to show but didn't, given the out of focus part of the bottom of the leaf.  I think this image displays stronger composition, but I'll let you be the judge of that.

[attachment=15118:leaf2.jpg]

John

Yes the composition is more clear, but for me it doesnt make sense. The leaf is not that attractive, and I want to know what light that is in the background but I cant see that. Not that its forbidden to show damaged leaves, but in this case it doesnt work for me.
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« Reply #14 on: July 05, 2009, 01:09:51 PM »
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Quote from: Christian Miersch
I want to know what light that is in the background but I cant see that.

Mission accomplished!  I like the ambiguity that bokeh creates.  Thanks for the comment.

John
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