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Author Topic: Public Exhibition Protocol?  (Read 1820 times)
spotmeter
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« on: July 02, 2009, 09:36:12 PM »
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A local bank has agreed to host an exhibition of my work. The bank is quite large, so there is enough room for about 40 of my prints, which range in size from 40 x 60 to 40 x 120.

This is my first public exhibit and I am wondering if there are any protocols to follow?

I plan to draw up a list of the prints and have the bank manager sign a receipt. I was also planning to distribute flyers to the local merchants. Apart from that, I don't know what is customarily done in these situations and would appreciate some advice.
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dalethorn
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« Reply #1 on: July 02, 2009, 10:04:46 PM »
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Quote from: spotmeter
A local bank has agreed to host an exhibition of my work. The bank is quite large, so there is enough room for about 40 of my prints, which range in size from 40 x 60 to 40 x 120.
This is my first public exhibit and I am wondering if there are any protocols to follow?
I plan to draw up a list of the prints and have the bank manager sign a receipt. I was also planning to distribute flyers to the local merchants. Apart from that, I don't know what is customarily done in these situations and would appreciate some advice.

Don't expect the bank to do much beyond preventing outright theft.  i.e., expect a few smudges here and there, since not every customer is an art aficionado.  I don't know if you intend to have a small business card placed between the occasional photo, or near each photo?  Might be good to plan that in advance.  Also be prepared to allow the bank some discretion in where the photos are placed, since they have as much interest in a "good look" to their viewing area as you do, and they wouldn't likely have the same view as to placement as you.  But you might get lucky, who knows.  Presumably there's an agreed upon timeframe for the exhibit, and when they come down.  It may be important to be there at a specific time to take the photos down, and/or it may be important to be there at a specific time to discuss your work with some of the bank's important customers.  I know some people who have done this, and they announced their exhibit in the local newspapers and Web-based event calendars for their geographic areas.
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ckimmerle
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« Reply #2 on: July 10, 2009, 10:50:56 AM »
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As this is more akin to a gallery show than a museum exhibit, you should include a small placard (4x6 mounted on foamcore) with each print indicating prices, along with the other usual data: title, your name, date, medium, size, etc. Also, be sure to leave either business cards or small take-aways for bank customers so that they can contact you and become YOUR customers, as well. If the bank does not want prices listed on the walls, and some business do not (museums almost never allow that), you can ask to leave a price sheet at the reception/managers desk. In addition to the placards accompanying each print, you should think about a larger placard in the 18x24 inch range that has your name, bio, and a short artist statement. That will give viewers a base for understanding your work as well as your motivations.

If you can get the bank management to agree, have an official exhibit opening after the bank officially closes. Wine and cheese are sure to bring in people. If that is not an option, an informal lunch reception may work. Either way, try to have a specific and official opening day designated so that the local media, whether TV, radio, newspaper, etc, have "hook", which is slang used in the media for a justification for covering an event. Mondays are great days to get local media folks to cover a story, as it's usually a fairly slow day and they are often in need of short story ideas.

As for image placement, depending on space available, you might be somewhat hindered, but be as deliberate as possible. Try and group prints using whatever criteria you deem works best. People don't respond as well to simple randomness as they do to a sense of order, whatever that might be: subject matter, feeling, location, mood, etc.  It will all depend on the specific photos and, of course, you.

Shows can be a bit stressful, but try and have as much fun with it as possible.

Chuck

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"The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeing new landscapes, but in having new eyes." Marcel Proust

Chuck Kimmerle
WWW.CHUCKKIMMERLE.COM
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